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Business Speech: Types with Examples, Informative, Special, Persuasive

business speech

Good presentation and speaking habits may be considered soft skills in the workplace or in any type of organization. Today in this article, we have shared what is business speech and how many types of business speeches are there.

Anybody can relate to all these types of business speech because these all are equally important in social life as well. So let’s start our topic with the basics of business speech.

► What is Business Speech?

Speech refers to that action when a person stands among a great number of people and starts delivering any kind of information or statement. It may be or may not be useful for the whole audience but most of the time it is valuable for them.

A speech that is delivered in the workplace or in any business organization for some specific purpose is known as Business Speech.

This is one of the forms of Business Communication and the audience has to sit quietly while the speech is being delivered. Most of the time audience knows very well that the speech must contain anything that will be beneficial for them.

► Types of Business Speech:

types of business speech

There are mainly three types of speech that are as follow;

  • Informative Speech
  • Persuasive Speech
  • Special Occasion Speech

◉ Informative Speech

Informative business speech can be defined as speech that comprises the purpose to deliver useful information to the audience.

For Example  – In any organization, an Executive Coach or Trainer speaking about the new trends in the market to his trainees. It can be hard to understand for few trainees, but the fact is that he is delivering something informative that is beneficial for them.

Informative Speech is further divided into four types;

  • Speeches about Objects
  • Speeches about Events
  • Speeches about Processes
  • Speeches about Concepts

The following are known kinds of informative speech.

✔ Speeches about Objects :

It can be about any object related to that particular organization where the speech is being delivered.

For Example  – how various wildlife animals look, what is the smell of medicine, information about any product.

✔ Speeches about Events :

Those speeches that inform the audience about any events like historical incidents or about any situations are called speeches about the event.

For Example  – New President’s speech about future goals after the oath-taking ceremony.

✔ Speeches about Processes :

The main purpose of this type of informative speech is to inform the audience about anything which is currently happening or about how to do any particular task or work.

For Example  – a Yoga teacher explaining how to perform specific yoga poses.

✔ Speeches about Concepts :

Speeches about concepts are those speeches that inform the audience about any concept such as the peace of the world, freedom of rights, or love, fundamentals of any study topic.

For Example – a Science teacher explains Einstein’s theory of general relativity to his students in the class.

Must Read : Skills of HR Manager

◉ Persuasive Speech

Persuasive Speech refers to those speeches where the intention of the speech is to convince the audience to accept the particular opinion or fact and create influence on the audience to do anyhow.

In short, the speech which influences the listeners or audience to follow a certain idea is called a persuasive speech.

Persuasive speech is also an informative speech. because here speaker gives information in a lucrative manner to influence others.

For Example  –  in any debate, every person is try to persuade others to follow their given point of view. It is a form of persuasive speech.

In another example, During the advertising and promotional functions of any business, the sales manager or speaker uses his persuasion skills to influence the audience. Here the main purpose of speech is to change the thinking, beliefs, or behaviors of the audience towards his product.

Persuasive speech can be divided into three types that are as follows:

  • Factual Persuasive Speech
  • Value Persuasive Speech
  • Policy Persuasive Speech

✔ Factual Persuasive Speech:

The Factual Persuasive Speech is such a speech that contains facts and it is based on a concrete proof about the certainty of anything that had happened.

The main purpose of this factual persuasive speech is to persuade the listeners whether the certain thing happened or not, exists or doesn’t exist.

For Example – If a student is giving a speech about the first man, who landed on the surface of the Moon. Nobody in the class knows whether it did happen or not, yet it possesses concrete proof.

✔ Value Persuasive Speech:

A Value Persuasive Speech is such a speech that tells the listeners about anything, whether it is wrong or right. The purpose of this speech is to challenge the ethical or moral aspects of a certain issue.

For Example –  If someone is giving a speech about capital punishment, whether it is moral or immoral, right or wrong, done or prevented. this type of speech is a value persuasive speech.

✔ Policy Persuasive Speech:

The policy persuasive speech refers to that speech where the speaker is trying to persuade the audience to either following a policy or rejecting it. It is not limited to just a policy, but it can be about accepting or rejecting a rule or a candidate is also a policy persuasive speech.

For Example – Suppose If the President of a country is not satisfied with the present foreign policy and wants to change it. The president gives a speech to higher authorities for convincing them to change the current foreign policy and support the new policy then it is known as policy persuasive speech.

Must Read : Types of Communication

◉ Special Occasion Speech:

Special Occasion speech refers to that speech which is given on the special occasion like;  A speech of farewell allows someone to say good-bye to one part of his or her life as he or she is moving on to the next part of life. Maybe you’ve accepted a new job and are leaving your current job.

Special occasion business speech is something which anyone can face at some point in their lives.

For example –  If your company won an award of the year for excellence. And you are receiving that award on the behalf of your company. The speech given by you after getting the award can be considered as a special occasion business speech.

In another example, If you are getting retirement from your job and want to thank your subordinates, superiors, and top management at the farewell party.

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12.3 Building a Sample Speech

Learning objectives.

  • Demonstrate how to build a sample speech by expanding on the main points you wish to convey.
  • Demonstrate how to use the five structural parts of any speech.

As you begin to investigate your topic, make sure you consider several sides of an issue. Let’s say you are going to do a speech to inform on the history of the First Transcontinental Railroad. At first you may have looked at just two sides, railroaders versus local merchants. Railroad tycoons wanted to bring the country together—moving people, goods, and services in a more efficient way—and to make money. Local merchants wanted to keep out competition and retain control of their individual markets.

Take another look at this issue and you see that several other perspectives have bearing on this issue. Shipping was done primarily by boat prior to the railroad, so shippers would not want the competition. Recent Chinese immigrants were in need of work. Native Americans did not want to lose their culture or way of life, and a railroad that crossed the country would cut right through the buffalo’s migration patterns. We now have five perspectives to the central issue, which makes the topic all the more interesting.

The general purpose is to inform the audience on the First Transcontinental Railroad and its impact on a young but developing United States. The thesis statement focuses on shipping, communication, and cultures across America.

  • Topic . First Transcontinental Railroad
  • General purpose statement . I want the audience to be more informed about the impact of the First Transcontinental Railroad.
  • Thesis statement . The First Transcontinental Railroad changed shipping, communication, and cultures across America.

With the information we have so far, we can now list three main points:

Change in shipping

Change in communication

Change in cultures

Think of each one of these main points as a separate but shorter speech. The point is to develop each of these main points like you have developed your overall speech. What do you want to focus on? The major types of shipping at the time of the First Transcontinental Railroad? One aspect you may want consider is to what degree is your audience familiar with this time in history. If they are not very familiar, a little background and context can help make your speech more meaningful and enhance its relevance to your thesis statement. By taking time to consider what you want to accomplish with each point, you will help yourself begin to address how you need to approach each point. Once you have thought about what you want to focus on for each point, list each subheading next to the main points. For example,

  • Navigating the waterways via barges and boats
  • Overland stagecoaches
  • Timetables for modes of travel
  • Letters in the days of the Pony Express
  • How the Morse Code telegraph system followed railroad lines
  • Bringing people together across distances
  • Prerailroad immigration
  • Impact on Native Americans
  • Territories become States

By now you’ve identified your key points and are ready to start planning your speech in more detail. While your organizational structure will vary from speech to speech, there are nonetheless five main parts of any speech: attention statement, introduction, body, conclusion, and residual message. These are basic to the rhetorical process and you will see time and time again, regardless of audience or culture, these same elements in some form utilized to communicate in public. They will serve to guide you, and possibly even save you should you get a last minute request to do a speech or presentation.

Place your hand on the table or desk and you’ll more likely see a thumb and four fingers. Associate your hand with these five elements. Each digit is independently quite weak, but together they make a powerful fist. Your thumb is quite versatile and your most important digit. It’s a lot like your attention statement. If you don’t gain the audience’s attention, the rest of the speech will be ineffective.

Each successive digit can represent the remaining four parts of any speech. One day you will be asked to speak with little or no time for preparation. By focusing on this organizational model, and looking down at your hand, you can quickly and accurately prepare your speech. With the luxury of time for preparation, each step can even be further developed. Remember the five-finger model of public speaking , as summarized in Table 12.3 “Five-Finger Model of Public Speaking” , and you will always stand out as a more effective speaker.

Table 12.3 Five-Finger Model of Public Speaking

Key Takeaway

Speeches are built by identifying the main points to be communicated and by following five structural elements (attention statement, introduction, body, conclusion, and residual message).

  • By visiting the library or doing an Internet search, find a speech given by someone you admire. The speech may be published in a book or newspaper, recorded in an audio file, or recorded on video. It may be a political speech, a business speech, or even a commercial sales pitch. Read or listen to the speech and identify the five structural elements as this speaker has used them. Post your results, discuss with classmates, and if a link to the speech is available, please be sure to include it.
  • By visiting the library or doing an Internet search, find a speech that would benefit from significant improvement. The speech may be published in a book or newspaper, recorded in an audio file, or recorded on video. It may be a political speech, a business speech, or even a commercial sales pitch. Read or listen to the speech and identify the five structural elements as this speaker has used them, noting specifically where they could improve their performance. Post your results, discuss with classmates, and if a link to the speech is available, please be sure to include it.
  • What functions does organization serve in a speech? Can organization influence or sway the audience? Explain your response and position.

Business Communication for Success: GVSU Edition Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Business LibreTexts

14.7: Sample Persuasive Speech

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Learning Objectives

  • Understand the structural parts of a persuasive speech.

Here is a generic, sample speech in an outline form with notes and suggestions.

Attention Statement

Show a picture of a person on death row and ask the audience: does an innocent man deserve to die?

Introduction

Briefly introduce the man in an Illinois prison and explain that he was released only days before his impending death because DNA evidence (not available when he was convicted), clearly established his innocence.

A statement of your topic and your specific stand on the topic:

“My speech today is about the death penalty, and I am against it.”

Introduce your credibility and the topic: “My research on this controversial topic has shown me that deterrence and retribution are central arguments for the death penalty, and today I will address each of these issues in turn.”

State your main points.

“Today I will address the two main arguments for the death penalty, deterrence and retribution, and examine how the governor of one state decided that since some cases were found to be faulty, all cases would be stayed until proven otherwise.”

Information: Provide a simple explanation of the death penalty in case there are people who do not know about it. Provide clear definitions of key terms.

Deterrence: Provide arguments by generalization, sign, and authority.

Retribution: Provide arguments by analogy, cause, and principle.

Case study: State of Illinois, Gov. George Ryan. Provide an argument by testimony and authority by quoting: “You have a system right now…that’s fraught with error and has innumerable opportunities for innocent people to be executed,” Dennis Culloton, spokesman for the Governor, told the Chicago Tribune . “He is determined not to make that mistake.”

Solution steps:

  • National level . “Stay all executions until the problem that exists in Illinois, and perhaps the nation, is addressed.”
  • Local level . “We need to encourage our own governor to examine the system we have for similar errors and opportunities for innocent people to be executed.”
  • Personal level . “Vote, write your representatives, and help bring this issue to the forefront in your community.”

Reiterate your main points and provide synthesis; do not introduce new content.

Residual Message

Imagine that you have been assigned to give a persuasive presentation lasting five to seven minutes. Follow the guidelines in Table \(\PageIndex{1}\) and apply them to your presentation.

Key Takeaway

A speech to persuade presents an attention statement, an introduction, the body of the speech with main points and supporting information, a conclusion, and a residual message.

  • Apply this framework to your persuasive speech.
  • Prepare a three- to five-minute presentation to persuade and present it to the class.
  • Review an effective presentation to persuade and present it to the class.
  • Review an ineffective presentation to persuade and present it to the class

Business Study Notes

B.Com, M.Com. BBA & MBA Exam Study Online

What is a Business Speech? Discuss the Types of Business Speech

Business Speech: Every individual is familiar with the idea of a business speech that what is business speech, its purpose and its importance. When a person stands among a great number of people and starts delivering any kind of information, which may be or may not be useful for the audience, but mostly it is valuable, is called a speech.

A speech that is delivered in business for some specific purpose is known as business speech. This is also one way of Business Communication and the audience has to sit on a chair for a few hours while the speech is being delivered. The audience knows it very well that the speech must contain anything that will beneficial for them.

Business Speech

The main purpose of business speech is to inform the audience about any specific topic. It really possesses great value in the field of business. Generally, the entrepreneur has to deal with public or private speeches on a regular basis. So for a passionate business candidate, it is necessary to know the basic purpose and types of business speech.

Types of Business Speech

The following are three main types of business speech.

  • Informative Speech/Speaking
  • Persuasive Speech/Speaking
  • Special Occasion Speech/Speaking

Let’s discuss them all below in detail.

Informative Business Speech

Informative business speech or speaking is such a speech that delivers any information to the audience that they don’t know before. In short, such speech, which comprises the purpose to deliver useful information to the audience is called informative speech. It can either be called as informative speaking.

Suppose that there is a professor in a class whose topic for the current day is to discuss the theory of relativity given by Albert Einstein . It seems confusing and hard to understand for a few students, but the fact is that the professor is delivering something informative.

Simply, conveying the information which is unknown to the audience is called informative speaking or speech. The following are known kinds of informative speech.

  • Speeches about Objects

Speeches about the objects are those speeches that are about things that grab the attention of the senses of the audience, such as touch, taste, smell, see, or feel. Its main purpose is to speak about the sensory objects or the things that have physical shape. It can be about how various wildlife animals look, what is the smell of medicine or any favorite song.

  • Speeches about Events

Those speeches that inform the audience about historical incidents or current occasions are called speeches about the event. For example, a new president of any country is delivering a speech on the oath-taking ceremony about future planning or events to be arranged, is a speech about the events.

  • Speeches about Processes

The main purpose of the speeches about processes is to inform the audience about anything which is currently happening. The best example of the speech about the process is a cooking class where the audience is informed about how to cook the specific dish by following a process.

  • Speeches about Concepts

Speeches that inform the audience about any concept such as the peace of the world, freedom of rights, or love, are called speeches about the concept. Through this kind of speech, the audience gets aware of the primary concept of any topic.

Persuasive Business Speech

The speech which is being delivered with the intention of convincing the audience to accept the particular opinion, viewpoint or fact and create influence on the audience to do anyhow, is called the persuasive business speech or persuasive speaking.

Suppose that the four friends are having a debate about global warming, each friend is trying to persuade others for following the given point of view; this can be called as a persuasive speech. Same as informative speech, it can be said as persuasive speaking.

In short, the speech which influences the listeners to follow a certain idea is called a persuasive speech. The persuasive speech comprises three kinds, which are defined briefly below.

  • Factual Persuasive Speech

The Factual Persuasive Speech is such a speech that is behind concrete proof about the certainty of anything that had happened. The main purpose of this speech is to persuade the listeners whether the certain thing happened or not, exists or doesn’t exist.  

Suppose that a student is giving a speech about the first man, who landed on the surface of the moon. Nobody knows whether it did happen or not, yet it possesses concrete proof.

  • Value Persuasive Speech

A Value Persuasive Speech is such a speech that tells the audience about anything, whether it is wrong or right. Its basic purpose is to challenge the ethical or moral aspect of a certain issue. For example, anyone is giving a speech about capital punishment, whether it is moral or immoral, right or wrong, done or prevented; this speech is a value persuasive speech.

  • Policy Persuasive Speech

The speech, which is given to persuade the audience for either following a policy or rejecting it, is known as a Policy Persuasive Speech. Not just a policy, but speech about accepting or rejecting a rule or a candidate is also a policy persuasive speech.

Suppose that the president of a country is not satisfied with the present foreign policy and wants to change it. The president goes to give a speech to higher authorities for convincing them to change the current foreign policy and support the new policy; this speech is a policy persuasive speech.

Special Occasion Business Speech

Everyone intentionally or unintentionally, knowingly or unknowingly becomes part of at least one special occasion business speech in the whole life span. When a person is asked to say a few words on the best friend’s wedding, parent’s anniversary, boss’s promotion or funeral of any relative, this is called the special occasion speaking or special occasion speech.

Usually, this kind of speech is delivered to show respect and kindness for a person or a special event. A range of entertaining speeches also comes under the category of special occasion speech. The basic purpose of the speech is to point out the importance of a specific person/event.

Most of the special occasion speeches are delivered on common occasions such as gathering in bar, award ceremonies, political events, weddings and so on. Sometimes, the special speech happens suddenly when the speaker is asked to say a few words about the event/person.

There are hundreds of events that are a part of a person’s daily life. Every special occasion requires at least one person to deliver the speech. To make it very convenient, special occasion speech is divided into four parts.

  • Ceremonial Speech

Ceremonial Speeches are those speeches that are given during any ceremony or ritual. These ceremonies possess special importance and require a specific person for delivering an effective speech. Making it to the point and easy to understand for everyone, ceremonial speech is divided into eight parts that include introductions, acceptances, presentations, dedications, roasts, toasts, farewell and eulogies. Below, each part is defined briefly.

  • Speech of Introduction

Speech of Introduction is the most common and very first part of ceremonial speech. The primary purpose of the speaker in these speeches is to introduce himself/herself or another speaker in a ceremony. Generally, it is also termed as mini-speech, because it takes only a few minutes to introduce anyone.

Suppose that a person stands up in a gathering and informs the audience that Mr. Smith is going to deliver a speech about Global Warming. In such a case, there will not be any impact of introduction on the audience, because the introduction only contains name and topic, nothing else.

The proper introduction speech covers a few factors such as the introduction, body and eventually the conclusion.

  • Speech of Presentation

The speech of presentation is given to accompany any award or honor. This is the second type of ceremonial speech. Presentation speeches can be as simple as giving a short introduction of a person as “This is Mr. Smith, who has won the Effective Public Speaker Award”. Before delivering a presentation speech, it is necessary to decide how long time it should take.

  • Speech of Acceptance

Actually, the speech of acceptance is a complement to the speech of presentation. It is delivered by the person who has won a prize or honor. These speeches also require a few sentences to define the primary purpose as “Mr. Smith is happy to receive the Effective Public Speaker Award and would like to thank the company”.

While on the other hand, these speeches can also be delivered at the beginning of a specific presentation or video as many singers give a speech at the beginning of a song.

  • Speech of Dedication

Speech of dedication is delivered at the inauguration ceremony of anything such as the opening of a new store, naming a building after someone, placing of a memorial on the wall, completion of a new library and so on. The basic purpose of delivering the speech of dedication is to highlight the importance of any project or dedicate it after any important person.

Suppose that uncle of Mr. Smith has passed away and contributed a massive amount to a school, so the school decides to dedicate one of the living or educational areas after the name of Smith’s uncle and Mr. Smith is asked to give a dedication speech.

Everyone is asked to deliver a toast at least once in life. A toast is a speech that is delivered with the purpose of appreciating or congratulating or remembering someone’s achievements. Usually, for congratulating someone about getting a new job or giving honor or celebrating a marriage, the toast is delivered.

While on the other hand, toasts can also be delivered for appreciating someone’s achievements. Finally, a toast is delivered for remembering someone’s accomplishments.

The roast speeches are very exciting as well as peculiar because their primary purpose is to either praise a person who is being honored or insult in a good-natured manner. Mostly, a roast is given in the final moment of a dinner party arranged in the honor of someone’s achievements.

Before defining the purpose of delivering eulogy speeches, there should be a little of what a eulogy is. The speech which is given in the honor of a person who has died is called the eulogy. The eulogy does not mean elegy, which is a song of mourning.

No one is allowed to deliver eulogies in the entire life span unless he is a priest, minister, imam, rabbi or other religious position of leadership.

  • Speech of Farewell

A speech of farewell is delivered to simply say good-bye to one part of the life when moving to the next part. Mostly, the speech of farewell is delivered at the farewell party of a person. When leaving the current job and getting a new job or moving ahead from graduate to the next level; this is the perfect time for a speech of farewell.

  • Inspirational Speech

Inspirational speeches are those speeches that provoke the emotions of the audience. At some point, an inspirational speech can also be a ceremonial speech. There are two types of inspirational speeches, i.e. goodwill speech and the speech of commencements.

  • Goodwill Speeches

Goodwill Speeches are delivered to change the perception of the audience in favor of an organization or a person. In short, it is an attempt to create a view of the audience more favorable for a person/company. Goodwill Speech can be both informative and persuasive by nature.

It delivers information and makes the audience approve of one’s opinion. The fact is that a goodwill speech is delivered on a specific event or gathering. The following are three main kinds of Goodwill Speeches i.e. Public Relations Speech, Justification Speech, and an Apology Speech.

  • Public Relations Speech

The main purpose of delivering public relations speech is to enhance the reputation of an organization or a person. The speaker tries to convince the audience to accept what is being heard.

  • Justification Speech

The speech of justification is given when someone tries to defend what made a person to take such critical actions. Mostly, the speaker is already in worse behavior when delivering a justification speech and tells the audience the reason for obtaining such behavior.

  • Apology Speech

Every individual is familiar with the idea of Apology Speech. When an actor, singer, politician, musician, professional athlete, or celebrity gets caught doing something inappropriate, then he/she decides to apologize for making such a mess. This is called an Apology Speech.

  • Speech of Commencements

Speech of Commencement happens when celebrating the unique achievement of any person. Mostly, this type of business speech is delivered when a person gets graduation from school. At some point in life, every individual has gone through a speech of commencement.

Author at Business Study Notes

Hello everyone! This is Richard Daniels, a full-time passionate researcher & blogger. He holds a Ph.D. degree in Economics. He loves to write about economics, e-commerce, and business-related topics for students to assist them in their studies. That's the sole purpose of Business Study Notes . Love my efforts? Don't forget to share this blog.

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What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

  • Carmine Gallo

speech on business communication

Five tips to set yourself apart.

Never underestimate the power of great communication. It can help you land the job of your dreams, attract investors to back your idea, or elevate your stature within your organization. But while there are plenty of good speakers in the world, you can set yourself apart out by being the person who can deliver something great over and over. Here are a few tips for business professionals who want to move from being good speakers to great ones: be concise (the fewer words, the better); never use bullet points (photos and images paired together are more memorable); don’t underestimate the power of your voice (raise and lower it for emphasis); give your audience something extra (unexpected moments will grab their attention); rehearse (the best speakers are the best because they practice — a lot).

I was sitting across the table from a Silicon Valley CEO who had pioneered a technology that touches many of our lives — the flash memory that stores data on smartphones, digital cameras, and computers. He was a frequent guest on CNBC and had been delivering business presentations for at least 20 years before we met. And yet, the CEO wanted to sharpen his public speaking skills.

speech on business communication

  • Carmine Gallo is a Harvard University instructor, keynote speaker, and author of 10 books translated into 40 languages. Gallo is the author of The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman  (St. Martin’s Press).

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Public Speaking Tips & Speech Topics

274 Speech Topics for Business [Persuasive, Informative]

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Jim Peterson has over 20 years experience on speech writing. He wrote over 300 free speech topic ideas and how-to guides for any kind of public speaking and speech writing assignments at My Speech Class.

Business speech topics in a row including company matters such as leadership and management and writing theses on strategic e-marketing for your meeting presentation.

business speech topics

List of Business Speech Topics

  • Your business will fail if you do not have good people skills.
  • In business both short and long-term goals are important.
  • Introverts are better entrepreneurs.
  • Market research is a key to starting a business.
  • Every business person needs a mentor.
  • You must have a business plan.
  • Why cold emailing potential clients actually works.
  • You should send past client’s thoughtful gifts.
  • You must always know your position in the market.
  • You should take full advantage of social media for your business.
  • It’s smart to create blog posts specific to your business.
  • Word of mouth is still the best way to get you new clients.
  • Working from home is the best productivity tool.
  • In business, you must always deliver an experience too.
  • You must know how to create your own opportunities.
  • The customer is not always right.
  • You will learn the most from your unhappy clients.
  • You should not start a business you are not passionate about.
  • Never be afraid of your competitors.
  • Always trust your instincts, even in business.
  • Being persistent and perseverant will work to your advantage.
  • You must never bad mouth your competition.
  • Failure isn’t necessarily a bad thing if you are willing to learn from them.
  • Business people must keep a diary and adhere to it religiously.
  • There are businesses that you can start with no money.
  • Why you should turn your passion into a business.
  • Marketing as an investment and not an option.
  • Successful business owners delegate well.
  • Unique selling propositions is not necessary for success.
  • Customer surveys will improve your business.
  • A business should first and foremost take good care of their employees.
  • People in the business environment shouldn’t have to hide their tattoo’s.
  • A dress code shouldn’t be necessary for an office.
  • Smoke breaks shouldn’t be allowed.
  • Brainstorming with co-workers will boost a company’s productivity.
  • Team building events are key to team motivation.
  • Virtual businesses will take over the retail world.
  • No one should stay at a company where their growth is limited.
  • IWhy working for the competitor is a good move.
  • Minimum wage is unfair.
  • Experience should be valued higher than qualifications.
  • Employers shouldn’t have the right to ask for your social media accounts.
  • French should become the business language of the world.
  • Sometimes franchising your business is a bad idea.
  • Written warnings are not always the best solution.
  • Theft should equal immediate dismissal.
  • A background check on potential staff members is a must.
  • Apprenticeship programs are of great value to young adults.
  • Product waste should be reused in other areas.
  • Product differentiation is good for companies.
  • Different cultural aspects need to be kept in consideration when doing research.
  • Why having a business on the side isn’t a bad thing.
  • For a physical business, location will always be key.
  • Why every business should give free perks to its employees.
  • Modern day businesses don’t need to promote their products.
  • Corporate businesses are taking over government.
  • A college degree will not guarantee success in business.
  • Poor leadership will bankrupt a business.
  • All businesses should go green.
  • New fathers should get paid time off to help with the baby.
  • Affirmative action is not right if someone is higher purely on race only.
  • Employees should be allowed dating each other.
  • Sexual harassment should be taken more seriously in the work place.
  • Business owner’s should constantly brush up on their skills as well as send their employees for further training.
  • A yearly bonus should be based on how well an employee did their job.
  • Loyal customers should be treated like royalty.
  • You can take negative reviews and turn them around.
  • Why mono-tasking is more productive than multi-tasking.
  • Businesses should never over work and under pay their employees.
  • Why a business should never cut back on quality.
  • Why every company should have random drug tests.
  • Job hoppers are not good for your business.
  • Hiring a lazy person isn’t always a bad thing.
  • Your company needs to be active in social media.
  • The owner of a company should be involved in the day to day running of his business.
  • Employees should always feel like they can approach their bosses at any time.
  • Companies should have the same set rules for everyone.
  • Companies should have important dates diarised and stick to those dates.
  • Keeping a person ready for retirement around will benefit younger staff.
  • When hiring you should always trust your gut instinct.
  • Company phones should not be used for personal use.
  • Employers should never ask staff to work through their lunch break.
  • Companies should have their closing dates finalised months before the time.
  • End of the year functions should be for the whole family.
  • You need to be iring people who speak multiple languages.
  • Large companies should provide day care.
  • Company vehicles should not be driven by several drivers.
  • Why companies should always deliver on their promises.
  • Sales should only take place if there is enough stock for a large number of people.
  • Black Friday sales should be food sales.
  • Why businesses should focus on creating more leaders for their companies.
  • Businesses should be careful to not spam their clients with too many emails.
  • Clients like businesses with good sense of humour.
  • Free food makes your employees happy.
  • Recruitment and staffing decisions are crucial to success.
  • Enhancing return on investment …
  • What is knowledge management and why is it important?
  • Creative team building methods to test with your own collegues.
  • Conditions for good franchising business agreements.
  • Exchanges planning for the unexpected when it comes to leadership and management challenges.
  • Paying bribes, why, when and why not?
  • Internal auditing – a hot business topic.
  • Preventing financial fraud
  • Benefits of performance-related pay.
  • Trends and mode factors in your branche or industry, these fashionable sales matters can be a very attractive business topic.
  • Review of a popular book about a narrow-casted theme that is related to your actual tendencies you see in your niche.
  • Kick start job hunting practices – telle and show them your approach of handling cases.
  • Small business ideas and opportunities.
  • Globalization trade opportunities as the world has come closer tied in client supply and demand structures.
  • Do the background check on staff personal or B2B consultants.
  • How to develop an apprenticeship program – a business speech sample topic of the category inform writing theses your public.
  • Ceiling on weekly working hours?
  • How to implement workers’ ideas – and go further than placing a suggestion box in the hall of the building.
  • Exporting issues related with government regulations.
  • The mighty power of strategy for winning in business and in life.
  • When consulting and when absolutely not – what are the outsourcing policies for seeking advice by third parties within your enterprise or firm.
  • Unique manufacturing methods that reduce production costs.
  • Trade protectionism or deregulation, what is the top-notch strategic e-marketing plan for your company?
  • Leadership and management always are hot topics for a business speech.
  • Merchandise marketing business speech topics.
  • Enhancing logistics and transportation are key components for economic growth.
  • The psychodynamics of organizational change management.
  • Trade in bankruptcy.
  • How crisis communication provides policies for the coordination of communication in the event of an emergency or controversial issue.
  • Top ten strategic e-marketing issues.
  • Fulfillment and the rest of consumer-related stuff, in my opinion that writing theses also has to be implemented in an elevator pitch.
  • Top five employer responsibilities.
  • How to avoid product wastage due to churning frozen food products.
  • Proven methods and insights to run successful retail business operations.
  • There is more to a good job than just a good salary.
  • Work tasks must adopt healthy and safe ergonomic postures for employees.
  • Employees must have easy access into all the facilities of a business.
  • Why you should pay your taxes.
  • Turn off computers when leaving the workplace.
  • The benefits of working for a large business are better than working for a smaller one.
  • Corporations like to invest in the capabilities of young female professionals.
  • The number of women in high positions could not be raised artificially.
  • The Aging Population Hurts The Economy
  • Strong unions are necessary in times of economic growth.
  • Business intelligence must be used strategically.
  • State antitrust laws to prevent monopolies should be abolished.
  • Rising food prices endanger Asian economies.
  • Real estate brokers are selling bad houses as palaces due to their creative terminology.
  • Raising the salaries of CEO’s in bad economic times should be forbidden.
  • Racial balance can be achieved without affirmative action.
  • Performance-related pay would enhance motivation.
  • A partnership is two way traffic
  • Team building motivates sales managers to stay at the top of their fields.
  • Employeers should have the right to dismiss employees that strike for unreasonable reasons.
  • Never work with someone that you don’t trust.
  • Networking: lifeblood of every entrepreneur.
  • Market mechanisms could do better to help poor people.
  • Asia will attain a strong and healthy growth in their global trade efforts.
  • Logistics is the base of enormous projects.
  • Legalization of long term illegal immigrants helps the economy.
  • Candidates should be told when their resumes have been received.
  • Invest with micro-credit in favellas.
  • India has the best booming and emerging market.
  • Night shift work has too many negative effects on employees.
  • Human resources management is another word for sacking people politely.
  • Debts should be consolidated.
  • Home businesses ruin family lives.
  • HIV positive employees ought to tell employers their status.
  • All business practice some form of corruption.
  • Free market policy is disastrous for Africa.
  • You must find a niche for your small business.
  • Employment programs are not effective.
  • Employers should not have access to genetic testing results.
  • The development of a business suffers because employees and managing directors want different things.
  • Higher minimum wages causes higher unemployment rates..
  • Companies should have a “Support the Arts” fund.
  • Coaching practices in the business accelerate staff growth.
  • Capitalism is not better than communism.
  • Capitalism has caused the financial crisis.
  • Beneath the top of the corporate ladder exists an invisible barrier for women.
  • Bartering has contemporary relevance.
  • Bank account holders are not protected well enough.
  • Asian countries make the most innovative cars.
  • Promotional phone calls and text messages from telemarketers is good for consumers.
  • The mega rich do pay enough federal income taxes.
  • You cannot protect your credit card from identity theft.
  • Hiring cheaper foreign employees hurts our economy.
  • Family leave time is a basic employee right.
  • There must be more tax-effective giving strategies for charity.
  • Limiting team sizes helps complete projects more effectively.
  • Globalization benefits the poor.
  • Support affirmative action in governmental organisations.
  • Corporations will benefit from using a computer hacker.
  • Integrity is everything in business.
  • Women will always be victims of discrimination in the workplace.
  • Professional ethics are not needed in corporate decision making.
  • Wildcat strikes should be legalized.
  • We should decide our own working hours.
  • Effective leadership is fundamental in the business field.
  • Companies should not hire employees for life.
  • Workers should not be allowed to strike whenever they want to.
  • Unions have caused ridiculous regulations.
  • Strikers should be fired.
  • Leadership skills, management qualities and reflexive abilities are all needed to become a successful business owner.
  • Labor unions provide value in the workplace.
  • Employer should be forbidden to track the Internet activity of their employees.
  • Why finance institutions want to see a business plan.
  • Adventure incentives increase employee loyalty.
  • Corruption and bribery: we can’t do without it when doing business abroad.
  • Strike is not the only weapon workers have.
  • Solid job security is better than an uncertain but satisfying special vocation.
  • Flexible working hours will reduce traffic jams.
  • Outsourcing is a good solution for small business owners.
  • Yes, there is a glass ceiling for women.
  • Labour unions are still relevant.
  • Co-workers will not work well together if they do not trust each other.
  • Corporations should create and maintain an internal anti-fraud code.
  • It is crucial for women to have a career before marriage.
  • Labor unions have too much influence.
  • General strikes harm people who are not involved.
  • Employees should be tested for drugs at their work place.
  • A good business supervisor takes employees seriously.

Informative

Informative business speech topics list including more than thirty items on creative accounting, time management, and flexible work arrangements and many more for a field of work presentation.

TIP : Use the words what, which, who, why and how in your central business speech idea and title. Also the words steps, methods, secrets or benefits will indicate that your presentation is about informative business speech topics.

  • Ergonomics in the workspace – chairs, tables and desks, physical poses that are good for people who sit all day.
  • Corporate loans and special grants for women start-ups. Yes, there happen to be lots of initiatives especially for female entrepreneurs. To start up an own company.
  • Store fixtures (offer ten solid examples and their benefits) like displays, goodie racks, inventive approaches, etc:
  • My checklist for going along with a partner – do not forget to ask the local Chamber of Commerce for help.
  • Creative accounting and the financial accounting standards. What is right and what is wrong? What are the gray zones you have to avoid?
  • Telemarketing ideas for small companies, techniques to operate on low costs per lead you get by direct marketing phone calls.
  • What is copyright protection? This theme opens the way for many informative business speech topics as you can guess. The how, what and when and the legal aspects.
  • How to introduce young people to selling and dealing – a mentor, a patron or are there new form of getting them on the job and let them be productive.
  • B2B contracts on intellectual property – dull stuff you think perhaps, but if you make a some kind of a floor plan or roadmap for future contracts you are the boss and an authority at once in this field for many who have to struggle with this.
  • When should we go outsourcing to third parties and what must the Human Resources department be concerned with?
  • Product labeling.
  • What if your commercial or industrial enterprise grows too fast.
  • How to deal with grant-making foundations and grant writing.
  • Backing up trade secrets with a signed confidentiality agreement.
  • What does the International Organization for Standardization – ISO do?
  • Good governance ethics and social responsibility. And what has accountability to do with it? Open the window to the outside consumer world of stay inside with closed curtains?
  • Types of insurance – assets and revenues, people and liability insurance.
  • Telecommuting, job sharing, part-time and other flexible work arrangements.
  • Risk management under pressure in the twenty four hour economy.
  • Hiring people and closing deals for the long term with highly skilled young urban professionals.
  • Quality control and tracking if everything went well as you planned it should be.
  • Commercial activities and industrial research – do those two mix? Is that a happy marriage? Can you aim at synergy?
  • Human resources benefits and the ways to maintain and develop human skills and know-how.
  • Safety programs and working conditions in relation to productivity.
  • Warranties and refunds.
  • Successful tendering in oter regional areas with lots of competitors you do not know well.26. Fair trade policy.
  • Time management – planning, organizing, setting goals.
  • Step by step starting and managing a small business.
  • Training and Development – strategic thinking, negotiation, communication, risk-taking.
  • Income tax for a sole trader explained.
  • Methods to protect data and information against intruders.
  • Does affirmative action work.
  • How to handle dissatisfied customers in a nice and polite way.
  • Negotiation techniques.
  • How to write effective business letters.
  • Unique Selling Proposition and Unique Point or positioning statement.
  • Three ways to attract customer attention.
  • The best marketing rules for setting prices.
  • Customer follow-up techniques as after-sales methods.
  • Partnership models.
  • Opportunities of internet advertising.
  • Amazing, successful and funny trading stories with a twist, a bite, and a moral conclusion.
  • Credibility and trust is the base of a brand.
  • How to use email to promote your business.
  • The benefits of having a female boss.
  • How to deal with breach of contract
  • Important business ethics
  • Examples of corporate crime.
  • Types of labor disputes.
  • Sexual harassment in the work place.
  • Work place violence.
  • How to uncover false qualifications and licenses.
  • The impact of oil price fluctuations on the economy.
  • Take a career break!
  • Ways to improve short and long term career plans
  • How Amazon started its path towards success.

143 Family Speech Topics [Persuasive, Informative]

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Chapter 11: Public Speaking

11.2 speaking in a business setting: elevator speech, learning objectives.

  • Employ audience analysis to adapt communication to supervisors, colleagues, employees, and clients.
  • Explain the role of intercultural communication competence in intercultural business communication contexts.
  • Identify strategies for handling question-and-answer periods.
  • Identify strategies for effectively planning and delivering common business presentations, including briefings, reports, training, and meetings.
  • Discuss the basic parts of an elevator speech.
  • Create an effective elevator speech.

Most people’s goal for a college degree is to work in a desired career field. Many of you are probably working while taking this class and already have experience with speaking in business settings. As you advance in your career, and potentially change career paths as many Americans do now, the nature of your communication and the contexts in which you speak will change. Today’s workers must be able to adapt content, level of formality, and format to various audiences including the public, clients, and colleagues (Dannels, 2001). What counts as a good communicator for one audience and in one field may not in another. There is wide variety of research and resources related to business communication that cannot be included in this section. The International Association of Business Communicators is a good resource for people interested in a career in this area:  http://www.iabc.com .

Adapt to Your Audience

Speaking in business settings requires adaptability as a communicator. Hopefully the skills that you are building to improve your communication competence by taking this class will enable you to be adaptable and successful. The following suggestions for adapting to your audience are based on general characteristics; therefore expect variations and exceptions. A competent communicator can use categories and strategies like these as a starting point but must always monitor the communication taking place and adapt as needed. In many cases, you may have a diverse audience with supervisors, colleagues, and employees, in which case you would need to employ multiple strategies for effective business communication.

Even though much of the day-to-day communication within organizations is written in the form of memos, e-mails, and reports, oral communication has an important place. The increase in documentation is related to an epidemic of poor listening. Many people can’t or don’t try to retain information they receive aurally, while written communication provides a record and proof that all the required and detailed information was conveyed. An increase in written communication adds time and costs that oral communication doesn’t. Writing and reading are slower forms of communication than speaking, and face-to-face speaking uses more human senses, allows for feedback and clarification, and helps establish relationships (Nichols & Stevens, 1999).

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Much communication in the workplace is written for the sake of documentation. Oral communication, however, is often more efficient if people practice good listening skills.

Queen’s University –  Alumni Volunteer Summit  – CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

It’s important to remember that many people do not practice good listening skills and that being understood contributes to effectiveness and success. You obviously can’t make someone listen better or require him or her to listen actively, but you can strive to make your communication more listenable and digestible for various audiences.

Speaking to Executives/Supervisors

Upward Communication  includes speeches, proposals, or briefings that are directed at audience members who hold higher positions in the organizational hierarchy than the sender. Upward communication is usually the most lacking within an organization, so it is important to take advantage of the opportunity and use it to your advantage (Nichols & Stevens, 1999). These messages usually function to inform supervisors about the status or results of projects and provide suggestions for improvement, which can help people feel included in the organizational process and lead to an increased understanding and acceptance of management decisions (Adler & Elmhorst, 2005). So how do we adapt messages for upward communication?

The “executive summary” emerged from the fact that executives have tightly scheduled days and prefer concise, relevant information. Executive summaries are usually produced in written form but must also be conveyed orally. You should build some repetition and redundancy into an oral presentation of an executive summary, but you do not need such repetition in the written version. This allows you to emphasize a main idea while leaving some of the supporting facts out of an oral presentation. If an executive or supervisor leaves a presentation with a clear understanding of the main idea, the supporting material and facts will be meaningful when they are reviewed later. However, leaving a presentation with facts but not the main idea may result in the need for another presentation or briefing, which costs an organization time and money. Even when such a misunderstanding is due to the executives’ poor listening skills, it will likely be you who is blamed.

Employees want to be seen as competent, and demonstrating oral communication skills is a good way to be noticed and show off your technical and professional abilities (Bartolome, 1999). Presentations are “high-visibility tasks” that establish a person’s credibility when performed well (Weinholdt, 2006). Don’t take advantage of this visibility to the point that you perform only for the boss or focus on him or her at the expense of other people in the audience. Do, however, tailor your message to the “language of executives.” Executives and supervisors often have a more macro perspective of an organization and may be concerned with how day-to-day tasks match with the mission and vision of the organization. So making this connection explicit in your presentation can help make your presentation stand out.

Be aware of the organizational hierarchy and territory when speaking to executives and supervisors. Steering into terrain that is under someone else’s purview can get you in trouble if that person guards his or her territory (McCaskey, 1999). For example, making a suggestion about marketing during a presentation about human resources can ruffle the marketing manager’s feathers and lead to negative consequences for you. Also be aware that it can be challenging to deliver bad news to a boss. When delivering bad news, frame it in a way that highlights your concern for the health of the organization. An employee’s reluctance to discuss problems with a boss leads to more risk for an organization (Bartolome, 1999). The sooner a problem is known, the better for the organization.

Speaking to Colleagues

Much of our day-to-day communication in business settings is  horizontal communication  with our colleagues or people who are on the same approximate level in the organizational hierarchy. This communication may occur between colleagues working in the same area or between colleagues with different areas of expertise. Such horizontal communication usually functions to help people coordinate tasks, solve problems, and share information. When effective, this can lead to more cooperation among employees and a greater understanding of the “big picture” or larger function of an organization. When it is not effective, this can lead to territoriality, rivalry, and miscommunication when speaking across knowledge and task areas that require specialization (Adler & Elmhorst, 2005).

Many colleagues work collaboratively to share ideas and accomplish tasks together. In a sharing environment, it can be easy to forget where an idea started. This becomes an issue when it comes time for credit or recognition to be given. Make sure to give credit to people who worked with you on a project or an idea. If you can’t remember where an idea came from, it may be better to note that it was a “group effort” than to assume it was yours and risk alienating a colleague.

Speaking to Supervisees/Employees

Downward communication  includes messages directed at audience members who hold a lower place on the organizational hierarchy than the sender. As a supervisor, you will also have to speak to people whom you manage or employ. Downward communication usually involves job instructions, explanations of organizational policies, providing feedback, and welcoming newcomers to an organization.

image

Supervisors can set a good example by keeping a good flow of information going to their employees.

Wikimedia Commons  – public domain.

This type of communication can have positive results in terms of preventing or correcting employee errors and increasing job satisfaction and morale. If the communication is not effective, it can lead to unclear messages that lead to misunderstandings and mistakes (Adler & Elmhorst, 2005).

During this type of “top-down” communication, employees may not ask valuable questions. So it is important to create an open atmosphere that encourages questions. Even though including an open discussion after a presentation takes more time, it helps prevent avoidable mistakes and wasted time and money. Let your audience know before a presentation that you will take questions, and then officially open the floor to questions when you are ready. Question-and-answer sessions are a good way to keep information flowing in an organization, and there is more information about handling these sessions in the “Getting Competent” box in this chapter.

A good supervisor should keep his or her employees informed, provide constructive feedback, explain the decisions and policies of the organization, be honest about challenges and problems, and facilitate the flow of information (Bartolome, 1999). Information should flow to and away from supervisors. Supervisors help set the tone for the communication climate of an organization and can serve as models of expectations of oral communication. Being prepared, consistent, open, and engaging helps sustain communication, which helps sustain morale. Supervisors also send messages, intentional or unintentional, based on where they deliver their presentations. For example, making people come to the executive conference room may be convenient for the boss but intimidating for other workers (Larkin & Larkin, 1999).

Speaking to Clients / Customers / Funding Sources

Communication to outside stakeholders includes messages sent from service providers to people who are not employed by the organization but conduct business with or support it. These stakeholders include clients, customers, and funding sources. Communication to stakeholders may be informative or persuasive. When first starting a relationship with one of these stakeholders, the communication is likely to be persuasive in nature, trying to convince either a client to take services, a customer to buy a product, or a funding source to provide financing. Once a relationship is established, communication may take the form of more informative progress reports and again turn persuasive when it comes time to renegotiate or renew a contract or agreement.

As with other types of workplace communication, information flow is important. Many people see a lack of information flow as a sign of trouble, so make sure to be consistent in your level of communication through progress reports or status briefings even if there isn’t a major development to report. Strategic ambiguity may be useful in some situations, but too much ambiguity also leads to suspicions that can damage a provider-client relationship. Make sure your nonverbal communication doesn’t contradict your verbal communication.

When preparing for a presentation to clients, customers, or funding sources, start to establish a relationship before actually presenting. This will help you understand what they want and need and will allow you to tailor your presentation to their needs. These interactions also help establish rapport, which can increase your credibility. Many people making a proposal mistakenly focus on themselves or their product or service. Focus instead on the needs of the client. Listen closely to what they say and then explain their needs as you see them and how your product or service will satisfy those needs (Adler & Elmhorst, 2005). Focus on the positive consequences or benefits that will result from initiating a business relationship with you. This is similar to Monroe’s Motivated Sequence organization pattern , which gets the audience’s attention, establishes the existence of a need or problem, presents a solution to fill the need, asks the audience to visualize positive results of adopting the solution, and then calls the audience to action.

Use sophisticated and professional visual aids to help sell your idea, service, or product. You can use strategies from our earlier discussion of visual aids, but add a sales twist. Develop a “money slide” that gets the audience’s attention with compelling and hopefully selling content that makes audience members want to reach for their pen to sign a check or a contract (Morgan & Whitener, 2006).

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Include a “money slide” in your presentation to potential clients or customers that really sells your idea.

Yair Aronshtam –  Slide projector  – CC BY-SA 2.0.

Proposals and pitches may be cut short, so imagine what you would do if you arrived to present and were told that you had to cut it down to one minute. If you were prepared, you could pull out your money slide. The money slide could be the most important finding, a startling or compelling statistic, an instructive figure or chart, or some other combination of text and graphic that connects to the listener. Avoid the temptation to make a complicated money slide. The point isn’t to fit as much as you can onto one slide but to best communicate the most important idea or piece of information you have. A verbal version of the money slide is the elevator speech. This is your sales pitch that captures the highlights of what you have to offer that can be delivered in a short time frame. I recommend developing a thirty-second, one-minute, and two-minute version of your elevator speech and having it on standby at all times.

Speaking in Intercultural Contexts

It’s no surprise that business communication is occurring in more intercultural contexts. Many companies and consulting firms offer cross-cultural training for businesspeople, and college programs in cross-cultural training and international business also help prepare people to conduct business in intercultural contexts. For specific information about conducting business in more than thirty-two countries, you can visit the following link:  http://www.cyborlink.com .

While these trainings and resources are beneficial, many people expect intercultural business communication training to be reduced to a series of checklists or rules for various intercultural interactions that may be conveyed in a two-hour, predeparture “everything you need to know about Japanese business culture” training. This type of culture-specific approach to cross-cultural training does not really stand up to the complex situations in which international business communicators find themselves (Victor, 1993). Scholars trained more recently in culture and communication prefer a culture-general approach that focuses on “tools” rather than “rules.” Remember that intercultural competence is relative to the native and host cultures of the people involved in an intercultural encounter, and therefore notions of what is interculturally competent change quickly (Ulijn et al., 2000). To review some of our earlier discussion, elements of intercultural competence involve the ability to identify potential misunderstandings before they occur, be a high self-monitor, and be aware of how self and others make judgments of value (Ulijn et al., 2000).

I will overview some intercultural business communication tips that are more like rules, but remember there are always exceptions, so other competent communication skills should be on standby to help you adapt when the rules approach stops working (Thrush, 1993).

In terms of verbal communication, make sure to use good pronunciation and articulation. Even if you speak a different language than your audience, clearer communication on your part will help the message get through better. Avoid idiomatic expressions and acronyms, since the meaning of those types of verbal communication are usually only known to cultural insiders. Try to use geographically and culturally relevant examples—for example, referencing the World Cup instead of the World Series. Be aware of differences in communication between high- and low-context cultures. Note that people from low-context cultures may feel frustrated by the ambiguity of speakers from high-context cultures, while speakers from high-context cultures may feel overwhelmed or even insulted by the level of detail used by low-context communicators. The long history of family businesses doing business with family businesses in France means that communication at meetings and in business letters operates at a high context. Dates and prices may not be mentioned at all, which could be very frustrating for an American businessperson used to highly detailed negotiations. The high level of detail used by US Americans may be seen as simplistic or childish to audience members from high-context cultures. Include some materials in the native language or include a glossary of terms if you’re using specific or new vocabulary. Don’t assume that the audience needs it, but have it just in case.

Also be aware that different cultures interpret graphics differently. Two well-known cases of differing interpretations of graphics involve computer icons. First, the “trash” icon first used on Mac desktops doesn’t match what wastebaskets look like in many other countries. Second, the US-style “mailbox” used as an icon for many e-mail programs doesn’t match with the mail experiences of people in most other countries and has since been replaced by the much more universally recognizable envelope icon. Nonelectronic symbols also have different cultural meanings. People in the United States often note that they are pursuing the “blue ribbon” prize or standard in their business, which is the color ribbon used to designate second place in the United Kingdom.

“Getting Competent”

Handling Question-and-Answer Periods

Question-and-answer (Q&A) periods allow for important interaction between a speaker and his or her audience. Speakers should always be accountable for the content of their speech, whether informative or persuasive, and making yourself available for questions is a good way to demonstrate such accountability. Question-and-answer sessions can take many forms in many contexts. You may entertain questions after a classroom or conference presentation. Colleagues often have questions after a briefing or training. Your supervisor or customers may have questions after a demonstration. Some question-and-answer periods, like ones after sales pitches or after presentations to a supervisor, may be evaluative, meaning you are being judged in terms of your content and presentation. Others may be more information based, meaning that people ask follow-up questions or seek clarification or more detail. In any case, there are some guidelines that may help you more effectively handle question-and-answer periods (Toastmasters International, 2012; Morgan & Whitener, 2006).

Setting the stage for Q&A.  If you know you will have a Q&A period after your presentation, alert your audience ahead of time. This will prompt them to take note of questions as they arise, so they don’t forget them by the end of the talk. Try to anticipate questions that the audience may have and try to proactively answer them in the presentation if possible; otherwise, be prepared to answer them at the end. At the end of your presentation, verbally and nonverbally indicate that the Q&A session is open. You can verbally invite questions and nonverbally shift your posture or position to indicate the change in format.

Reacting to questions.  In evaluative or informative Q&A periods, speakers may feel defensive of their idea, position, or presentation style. Don’t let this show to the audience. Remember, accountability is a good thing as a speaker, and audience members usually ask pertinent and valid questions, even if you think they aren’t initially. Repeating a question after it is asked serves several functions. It ensures that people not around the person asking the question get to hear it. It allows speakers to start to formulate a response as they repeat the question. It also allows speakers to ensure they understood the question correctly by saying something like “What I hear you asking is…” Once you’ve repeated the question, respond to the person who posed the question, but also address the whole audience. It is awkward when a speaker just talks to one person. Be cautious not to overuse the statement “That’s a good question.” Saying that more than once or twice lessens its sincerity.

Keeping the Q&A on track.  To help keep the Q&A period on track, tie a question to one of the main ideas from your presentation and make that connection explicit in your response. Having a clearly stated and repeated main idea for your presentation will help set useful parameters for which questions fall within the scope of the presentation and which do not. If someone poses a question that is irrelevant or off track, you can politely ask them to relate it to a main idea from the talk. If they can’t, you can offer to talk to them individually about their question after the session. Don’t engage with an irrelevant question, even if you know the answer. Answering one “off-track” question invites more, which veers the Q&A session further from the main idea.

Responding to multipart questions.  People often ask more than one question at a time. As a speaker and audience member this can be frustrating. Countless times, I have seen a speaker only address the second question and then never get back to the first. By that point, the person who asked the question and the audience have also usually forgotten about the first part of the question. As a speaker, it is perfectly OK to take notes during a Q&A session. I personally take notes to help me address multipart questions. You can also verbally reiterate the question to make sure you know which parts need to be addressed, and then address the parts in order.

Managing “Uh-oh!” moments.  If a person corrects something you said in error during your presentation, thank them for the correction. After the presentation, verify whether or not it was indeed a mistake, and if it was, make sure to correct your information so you don’t repeat the mistake in future talks. Admit when you don’t know the answer to a question. It’s better to admit that you do not know the answer than to try to fake your way through it. An audience member may also “correct” you with what you know is incorrect information. In such cases, do not get into a back-and-forth argument with the person; instead, note that the information you have is different and say you will look into it.

Concluding the Q&A session.  Finally, take control of your presentation again toward the end of the Q&A session. Stop taking questions in time to provide a brief wrap-up of the questions, reiterate the main idea, thank the audience for their questions, and conclude the presentation. This helps provide a sense of closure and completeness for the presentation.

  • Which of these tips could you have applied to previous question-and-answer sessions that you have participated in to make them more effective?
  • Imagine you are giving a presentation on diversity in organizations and someone asks a question about affirmative action, which was not a part of your presentation. What could you say to the person?
  • In what situations in academic, professional, or personal contexts of your life might you be engaged in an evaluative Q&A session? An information-based Q&A session?

Common Business Presentations

Now you know how to consider your audience in terms of upward, downward, or horizontal communication. You also know some of the communication preferences of common career fields. Now we will turn our attention to some of the most frequent types of business presentations: briefings, reports, training, and meetings.

Briefings  are short presentations that either update listeners about recent events or provide instructions for how to do something job related (Adler & Elmhorst, 2005). Briefings may occur as upward, downward, or horizontal communication. An industrial designer briefing project managers on the preliminary results of testing on a new product design is an example of upward briefing. A nurse who is the shift manager briefing an incoming shift of nurses on the events of the previous shift is an example of downward briefing. A representative from human resources briefing colleagues on how to use the new workplace identification badges is an example of horizontal briefing. Briefings that provide instructions like how to use a new identification badge are called  Technical Briefings ,  and they are the most common type of workplace presentation (Toastmasters International, 2012). For technical briefings, consider whether your audience is composed of insiders, outsiders, or a mixture of people different levels of familiarity with the function, operation, and/or specifications of the focus of the briefing. As we have already discussed, technical speaking requires an ability to translate unfamiliar or complex information into content that is understandable and manageable for others.

12-3-3n

Technical briefings, which explain how something functions or works, are the most common type of workplace presentations.

Shamim Mohamed –  Debrief  – CC BY-SA 2.0.

As the name suggests, briefings are  brief —usually two or three minutes. Since they are content focused, they do not require formal speech organization, complete with introduction and conclusion. Briefings are often delivered as a series of bullet points, organized topically or chronologically. The content of a briefing is usually a summary of information or a series of distilled facts, so there are rarely elements of persuasion in a briefing or much supporting information. A speaker may use simple visual aids, like an object or even a one-page handout, but more complex visual aids are usually not appropriate. In terms of delivery, briefings should be organized. Since they are usually delivered under time constraints and contain important information, brief notes and extemporaneous delivery are effective (Adler & Elmhorst, 2005).

People in supervisory or leadership positions often provide  training , which includes presentations that prepare new employees for their jobs or provide instruction or development opportunities for existing employees. While some training is conducted by inside and outside consultants, the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics notes that about 75 percent of training is delivered informally while on the job (Adler & Elmhorst, 2005). As the training and development field expands, this informal training is likely to be replaced by more formalized training delivered by training professionals, many of whom will be employees of the company who have been certified to train specific areas. Organizations are investing more time and money in training because they recognize the value in having well-trained employees and then regularly adding to that training with continued development opportunities. Common focuses of training include the following:

  • Compliance with company policies.  Includes training and orienting new hires and ongoing training for existing employees related to new or changing company policies.
  • Changing workplace environments.  Diversity training and cross-cultural training for international business.
  • Compliance with legal policies.  Sexual harassment, equal employment, Americans with Disabilities Act, and ethics training.
  • Technical training.  Instructions for software, hardware, and machinery.

Companies are also investing money in training for recent college graduates who have degrees but lack the technical training needed to do a specific job. This upfront investment pays off in many situations, as this type of standardized training in field-specific communication skills and technology can lead to increased productivity.

12-3-4n

Corporate trainers prepare new employees for their jobs and provide development opportunities for existing employees.

Louisiana GOHSEP –  Employees Attend Training Classes  – CC BY-SA 2.0.

Trainers require specific skills and an ability to adapt to adult learners (Ray, 1993). Important training skills include technical skills specific to a discipline, interpersonal skills, organizational skills, and critical thinking skills. Trainers must also be able to adapt to adult learners, who may have more experience than the trainer. Training formats usually include a mixture of information presentation formats such as minilecture and discussion as well as experiential opportunities for trainees to demonstrate competence such as role-play, simulation, and case-study analysis and application. Trainers should remember that adult learners learn best by doing, have previous experience that trainers can and should draw on, have different motivations for learning than typical students, and have more competing thoughts and distractions. Adult learners often want information distilled down to the “bottom line”; demonstrating how content is relevant to a specific part of their work duties or personal success is important.

Steps in Developing a Training Curriculum  (Beebe, Mottet, & Roach, 2004)

  • Do background research based on literature on and observations of the training context you will be in.
  • Conduct a needs assessment to see what sort of training is desired/needed.
  • Develop training objectives based on research, observations, and needs assessment. Objectives should be observable, measurable, attainable, and specific.
  • Develop content that connects to the needs assessment.
  • Determine the time frame for training; make the training as efficient as possible.
  • Determine methods for delivering content that connect with objectives developed earlier.
  • Select and/or create training materials.
  • Create a participant’s guide that contains each activity and module of the training.
  • Include the following for each training activity: objectives, training content, time frame, method, and materials needed.
  • Test the training plan on a focus group or with experts in the field to evaluate and revise if necessary.

Over eleven million meetings are held each day in the United States, so it is likely that you will attend and lead meetings during your career. Why do we have meetings? The fundamental reason is to get a group of people with different experiences and viewpoints together to share their knowledge and/or solve a problem. Despite their frequency and our familiarity with them, meetings are often criticized for being worthless, a waste of time, and unnecessary. Before you call a meeting, ask yourself if it is necessary, since some issues are better resolved through a phone call, an e-mail, or a series of one-on-one meetings. Ask the following questions to help make sure the meeting is necessary: What is the goal of the meeting? What would be the consequences of not having it? How will I judge whether the meeting was successful or not? (Jay, 1999)

Meetings are important at the early stages of completing a task, as they help define a work team since the members share a space and interact with each other. Subsequent meetings should be called when people need to pool knowledge, refine ideas, consider new information, or deliberate over a decision. Most meetings are committee size, which ranges from three to ten people. The frequency of the meeting will help determine how the meeting should be run. Groups that meet daily will develop a higher level of cohesion and be able to work through an agenda quickly with little review. Most groups meet less frequently, so there typically needs to be a structured meeting agenda that includes informational items, old business, and new business.

In determining the meeting agenda, define the objectives for various items. Some items will be informative, meaning they transmit information and don’t require a decision or an action. Other items will be constructive, in that they require something new to be devised or decided, such as determining a new policy or procedure. Once a new policy or procedure has been determined, a group must decide on the executive components of their decision, such as how it will be implemented and who will have responsibilities in the process. As the items progress from informational, to constructive, to executive, the amount of time required for each item increases, which will have an effect on the planning of the agenda (Jay, 1999).

After completing the agenda, continue to plan for the meeting by providing attendees with the agenda and any important supporting or supplementary materials such as meeting minutes or reports ahead of time. Consult with people who will attend a meeting beforehand to see if they have any questions about the meeting and to remind them to review the materials. You can also give people a “heads up” about any items for discussion that may be lengthy or controversial. Make sure the meeting room can accommodate the number of attendees and arrange the seating to a suitable structure, typically one where everyone can see each other. A meeting leader may also want to divide items up as “for information,” “for discussion,” or “for decision.” Start the meeting by sharing the objective(s) that you determined in your planning. This will help hold you and the other attendees accountable and give you something to assess to determine the value of the meeting.

People’s attention spans wane after the first twenty minutes of a meeting, so it may be useful to put items that warrant the most attention early on the agenda. It is also a good idea to put items that the group can agree on and will unify around before more controversial items on which the group may be divided. Anything presented at the meeting that wasn’t circulated ahead of time should be brief, so people aren’t spending the meeting reading through documents. To help expedite the agenda, put the length of time you think will be needed for each item or category of items on the agenda. It is important to know when to move from one item to the next. Sometimes people continue to talk even after agreement has been reached, which is usually a waste of time. You want to manage the communication within the meeting but still encourage people to speak up and share ideas. Some people take a more hands-on approach to managing the conversation than others. As the president of the graduate student body, I attended a few board of trustees meetings at my university. The chairperson of the committee had a small bell that she would ring when people got off track, engaged in personal conversations, or were being disruptive to the order of the group.

At the end of the meeting make sure to recap what was accomplished. Return to the objective you shared at the beginning and assess whether or not you accomplished it. If people feel like they get somewhere during a meeting, they will think more positively about the next one. Compile the meeting minutes in a timely fashion, within a few days and no more than a week after the meeting (Jay, 1999).

Tips for Running Effective Meetings

  • Distribute an agenda to attendees two to three days in advance of the meeting.
  • Divide items up on the agenda into “for information,” “for discussion,” and “for decision.”
  • Put items that warrant close attention early on the agenda.
  • Since senior attendees’ comments may influence or limit junior people’s comments, ask for comments from junior attendees first.
  • People sometimes continue talking even after agreement has been reached, so it’s important to know when to move on to the next item in the agenda.
  • At the end of a meeting, recap what was accomplished and set goals for the next meeting.
  • Compile meeting minutes within forty-eight hours and distribute them to the attendees.
  • Identify a recent instance when you engaged in upward, horizontal, downward, or intercultural communication in a business setting. Analyze that communication encounter based on the information in the corresponding section of this chapter. What was done well and what could have been improved?
  • Prepare a briefing presentation on how to prepare a briefing. Make sure to follow the suggestions in the chapter.
  • Think of a time when you received training in a business or academic setting. Was the communication of the trainer effective? Why or why not?

Elevator Speech

An elevator speech is to oral communication what a Twitter message (limited to 140 characters) is to written communication. It has to engage and interest the listener, inform and/or persuade, and be memorable (Howell, L., 2006). An  elevator speech  is a presentation that persuades the listener in less than thirty seconds, or around a hundred words. It takes its name from the idea that in a short elevator ride (of perhaps ten floors), carefully chosen words can make a difference. In addition to actual conversations taking place during elevator rides, other common examples include the following:

  • An entrepreneur making a brief presentation to a venture capitalist or investor
  • A conversation at the water cooler
  • Comments during intermission at a basketball game
  • A conversation as you stroll across the parking lot

Creating an Elevator Speech

An elevator speech does not have to be a formal event, though it can be. An elevator speech is not a full sales pitch and should not get bloated with too much information. The idea is not to rattle off as much information as possible in a short time, nor to present a “canned” thirty-second advertising message, but rather to give a relaxed and genuine “nutshell” summary of one main idea. The speech can be generic and nonspecific to the audience or listener, but the more you know about your audience, the better. When you tailor your message to that audience, you zero in on your target and increase your effectiveness (Albertson, E., 2008). The emphasis is on brevity, but a good elevator speech will address several key questions:

  • What is the topic, product or service?
  • Who are you?
  • Who is the target market? (if applicable)
  • What is the revenue model? (if applicable)
  • What or who is the competition and what are your advantages?

Table 11.1 “Parts of an Elevator Speech”  adapts the five parts of a speech to the format of the elevator speech.

Table 11.1  Parts of an Elevator Speech

  • How are you doing?
  • Great! Glad you asked. I’m with (X Company) and we just received this new (product x)—it is amazing. It beats the competition hands down for a third of the price. Smaller, faster, and less expensive make it a winner. It’s already a sales leader. Hey, if you know anyone who might be interested, call me! (Hands business card to the listener as visual aid)

Key Takeaway

  • What counts as being a good communicator in one business context doesn’t in another, so being able to adapt to various business settings and audiences will help you be more successful in your career. This includes being well versed in areas of upwards, horizontal, and downward communication.
  • Upward business communication involves communicating messages up the organizational hierarchy. This type of communication is usually the most lacking in organizations. However, since oral presentations are a “high-visibility” activity, taking advantage of these opportunities can help you get noticed by bosses and, if done well, can move you up the organizational ladder. Present information succinctly in an executive summary format, building in repetition of main ideas in the oral delivery that aren’t necessary for the written version. Don’t just focus on the boss if there are other people present, but do connect to the vision and mission of the organization, since most managers and executives have a “big picture” view of the organization.
  • Horizontal communication is communication among colleagues on the same level within an organizational hierarchy. This type of communication helps coordinate tasks and lets people from various parts of an organization get a better idea of how the whole organization functions. Many workplaces are becoming more collaborative and team oriented, but make sure you share credit for ideas and work accomplished collaboratively so as not to offend a colleague.
  • Downward communication includes messages traveling down the organizational hierarchy. These messages usually focus on giving instructions, explaining company policies, or providing feedback. As a supervisor, make sure to encourage employees to ask questions following a presentation. Good information flow helps prevent employee errors and misunderstandings, which saves money.
  • Initial communication with clients, customers, or funding sources is usually persuasive in nature, as you will be trying to secure their business. Later communication may be more informative status reports. Connect your message to their needs rather than focusing on what you offer. Use persuasive strategies like positive motivation, and always have a “money slide” prepared that gets across the essence of what you offer in one attractive message.
  • When adapting business communication to intercultural contexts, take a “tools not rules” approach that focuses on broad and adaptable intercultural communication competence.

There are various types of business presentations for which a speaker should be prepared:

  • Briefings are short, two- to three-minute “how-to” or “update” presentations that are similar to factual bullet points.
  • Reports can be past, present, or future focused and include status, final, and feasibility reports.
  • Trainings are informal or formal presentations that help get new employees ready for their jobs and keep existing employees informed about changing policies, workplace climates, and legal issues.
  • To have an effective meeting, first make sure it is necessary to have, then set a solid foundation by distributing an agenda in advance, manage the flow of communication during the meeting, and take note of accomplishments to promote a positive view of future meetings.
  • You often don’t know when opportunity to inform or persuade will present itself, but with an elevator speech, you are prepared!
  • Pick a product or service and prepare an elevator speech (less than a hundred words, no more than thirty seconds). Rehearse the draft out loud to see how it sounds and post or present it in class.
  • Find an example of an elevator speech online (YouTube, for example) and review it. Post the link and a brief summary of strengths and weaknesses. Share and compare with classmates.
  • Prepare an elevator speech (no more than thirty seconds) and present to the class.

Adler, R. B. and Jeanne Marquardt Elmhorst,  Communicating at Work: Principles and Practices for Businesses and the Professions , 8th ed. (Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill, 2005), 15.

Albertson, E. (2008).  How to open doors with a brilliant elevator speech . New Providence, NJ: R. R. Bowker.

Bartolome, F., “Nobody Trusts the Boss Completely—Now What?” in  Harvard Business Review on Effective Communication  (Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1999), 92.

Beebe, S. A., Timothy A. Mottet, and K. David Roach,  Training and Development: Enhancing Communication and Leadership Skills  (Boston, MA: Pearson, 2004).

Dannels, D. P., “Time to Speak Up: A Theoretical Framework of Situated Pedagogy and Practice for Communication across the Curriculum,”  Communication Education  50, no. 2 (2001): 144.

Howell, L. (2006).  Give your elevator speech a lift . Bothell, WA: Publishers Network.

Jay, A., “How to Run a Meeting,” in  Harvard Business Review on Effective Communication  (Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1999), 34.

Larkin, T. J. and Sandar Larkin, “Reaching and Changing Frontline Employees,” in  Harvard Business Review on Effective Communication  (Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1999), 152.

McCaskey, M. B., “The Hidden Messages Managers Send,” in  Harvard Business Review on Effective Communication  (Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1999), 128.

Morgan, S. and Barrett Whitener,  Speaking about Science: A Manual for Creating Clear Presentations  (New York, NY: Cambridge, 2006), 18.

Nichols, R. G. and Leonard A. Stevens, “Listening to People,” in  Harvard Business Review on Effective Communication  (Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1999), 14–15.

Ray, R. L., “Introduction: The Academic as Corporate Consultant,” in  Bridging Both Worlds: The Communication Consultant in Corporate America , ed. Rebecca L. Ray (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1993), 6–8.

Thrush, E. A., “Bridging the Gaps: Technical Communication in an International and Multicultural Society,”  Technical Communication Quarterly  2, no. 3 (1993): 275–79.

Toastmasters International, “Proposals and Pitches” accessed March 17, 2012,  http://www.toastmasters.org/MainMenuCategories/FreeResources/NeedHelpGivingaSpeech/BusinessPresentations/ProposalsandPitches.aspx

Ulijn, J., Dan O’Hair, Matthieu Weggeman, Gerald Ledlow, and H. Thomas Hall, “Innovation, Corporate Strategy, and Cultural Context: What Is the Mission for International Business Communication?”  Journal of Business Communication  37 (2000): 301.

Victor, D., “Cross-Cultural Communication” in  Bridging Both Worlds: The Communication Consultant in Corporate America , ed. Rebecca L. Ray (Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1993), 113.

Weinholdt, R., “Taking the Trauma Out of the Talk,”  The Information Management Journal  40, no. 6 (2006): 62.

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Business Communication

What is Speech Communication? Characteristics of a Good Speech

What is Speech Communication ? Characteristics of a Good Speech, Speech communication definition, Meaning of Speech, Business Speech. Speech is an important medium of oral communication by which message is sent to the audience orally from the speaker. A speech is a public speaking delivered by a speaker on some occasions. It is a formal talking before a large number of people but is can be informal also.

Industrialists and businessmen are to speak in different conference or seminars or in some public gatherings. With the increasing awareness of the value of public relation in business, most of the companies encourage their executives to attend public functions and to appear before the public and to accept invitations to be the chief guest or speaker at meetings. A salesman also has to make hundreds of mini speech is inevitable in business.

What is Speech Communication

According to Oxford Dictionary, “A speech is a formal talk that a person gives to an audience.”

What is Speech Communication

Characteristics or Qualities of a Good Speech

Speech is one of the major medium of oral communication . We find different speeches in different situations but good speeches are not always found. A good speech is really enjoyable and informative. But it is very tough to deliver a speech that can enthrall the audience. A good speech has following characteristics or qualities-

  • Dynamic : Dynamism is an important quality of a good speech. There must e variation in style, tone, voice, approach depending on the situation and timing otherwise audience will lose their attention and will suffer form monotonous presentation.
  • Informal Talk : Speech should be like an informal talk. A good speech is closer to a personal and informal chat between two intimate friends. When you speak there should be a perfect rapport between you and your audience.
  • Clear : Clarity is the first major characteristic of a good speech. A speech must be successful in conveying the (message) ideas or emotions, facts or arguments to the audience that the speaker wants to express. If the audience does not instantly grasp your point, you have failed as a speaker.
  • Vivid and Concrete : A good speech is vivid and concrete in nature. Include facts in a concrete and comprehensive way. No irrelevant or in comprehensive mater should be included in a speech. For example, the population of India is growing at an accelerating rate of 2.3% is a vivid statement.
  • Brevity : Brevity is an important characteristic of a god speech. Speech should be shorter and concrete but comprehensive. The concentration of average audience does not last more than fifteen to twenty minutes. So, it is better to wrap up your speech within five to twenty minutes.
  • Interesting : A good speech is always interesting. Quotations, anecdotes and humors make a speech vivid and interesting. An interesting speech always wins the attention of the audience.
  • Audience Oriented : A good speech is always audience oriented. The speaker must deliver the speech in such a way as desired by the audience. The speaker should consider the age, education, social and economic condition, number etc. of audience to prepare his speech accordingly.
  • Free From Error : A good speech is always free from error. Error in speech can make the audience confused and loose the personality of the speaker.
  • Authentic : The facts and figure presented in a speech must be authentic and true. False statement or information misleads the audience and hamper the acceptability of speech.
  • Well Organized : A good speech is always well organized and well arranged. The pats or points of a speech should be organized in logical sequence to attract and retain h attention of the audience.

Beside the above-mentioned criteria, a good speech also has some other criteria like visual presentation, timely presentation and result oriented and so on. A speaker should consider these qualities of a speech before presenting something on the dais. There are more information about What is Business Memo in Communication? Functions of Memorandum.

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12.5 Organizing Principles for Your Speech

Learning objective.

  • Identify and understand how to use at least five different organizing principles for a speech.

There are many different ways to organize a speech, and none is “better” or “more correct” than the others. The choice of an organizing principle , or a core assumption around which everything else is arranged, depends on the subject matter, the rhetorical situation, and many other factors, including your preference as speaker.

The left column of Table 12.6 “Sample Organizing Principles for a Speech” presents seventeen different organizing principles to consider. The center column explains how the principle works, and the right column provides an applied example based on our sample speech about the First Transcontinental Railroad. For example, using a biographical organizing principle, you might describe the journey of the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804; the signing of the Pacific Railroad Act in 1862, and the completion of the first Transcontinental Express train trip in 1876. As another example, using a spatial organizing principle, you might describe the mechanics of how a steam locomotive engine works to turn the train wheels, which move on a track to travel across distances.

As you read each organizational structure, consider how the main points and subheadings might change or be adapted to meet each pattern.

Table 12.6 Sample Organizing Principles for a Speech

Key Takeaway

A speech may be organized according to any of many different organizing principles.

  • Choose at least three different organizing principles from the left column of Table 12.6 “Sample Organizing Principles for a Speech” . Take the thesis of a speech you are preparing and write an applied example, similar to the ones provided about the First Transcontinental Railroad that shows how you would apply each of your chosen organizing principles to your speech.
  • Think of one technology or application that you perceive has transformed your world. Choose two organizing principles and create two sample outlines for speeches about your topic. Share and compare with classmates.

Ayres, J., & Miller, J. (1994). Effective public speaking (4th ed., p 274). Madison, WI: Brown & Benchmark.

Maslow, A. (1970). Motivation and personality (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Harper & Row.

Shutz, W. (1966). The interpersonal underworld . Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.

Business Communication for Success Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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McGill’s School of Communication Sciences and Disorders is proud to be hosting a research talk on enhancing the language of adolescents with DLD and a workshop on using narratives in clinical assessment and intervention.

These events are funded by the Scaringi Lecture Series grant. This year the events are also co-sponsored by the FRQSC group on Cognitive plasticity and language acquisition.

Speaker: Victoria Joffe School of Health and Social Care University of Essex Research Talk and Reception April 5, 2024, 5:00 to 7:00 pm Leacock, room 232 855 Sherbrooke St W, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T7

Enhancing Language and Communication in Adolescents with Language Disorder across Levels of Service provision: Specialist, Targeted and Universal. There is strong evidence for the pervasiveness of Developmental/Language Disorder (D/LD), and its long-term impact on academic performance, employment, socialisation and wellbeing. These difficulties persist over time and can increase during adolescence and adulthood. Adolescents and young adults with (D)/LD are a significantly under-researched and under-serviced client population. However, there is an emerging evidence base for enhancing language and communication in this group, and Speech and Language Therapy services are typically offered at three levels of service provision: universal, targeted, and specialist. The talk will describe these different service delivery models, providing evidence for the effectiveness of intervention in storytelling and vocabulary at the targeted and universal levels in the adolescent group. Consideration will be given to the factors that contribute to the selection of service provision, including severity of the disorder, school setting, staff expertise, resource allocation and staff and client perspectives. This presentation will incorporate a critical appraisal of the interplay between resource-led and needs-led components, and the current evidence base. Results from the experimental studies, and views and perspectives from speech and language pathologists, teachers, and young people in receipt of the intervention will be shared. Common themes in working with adolescents with language disorder in schools will be identified with implications for education and clinical practice. Key ingredients for success will be identified to maximize engagement in the therapy process, emphasizing needs-led provision in order to enhance long term outcomes.

Clinical Workshop April 4, 2024, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm Room TBA

Using Narratives to Enhance Speech, Language and Communication in Students with Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN): the magic of storytelling. This workshop introduces and explores the different types of narratives that are used routinely in our daily lives. The importance of narratives in language development, educational attainment and social and emotional development across cultures will be highlighted. Information is provided on the importance of narratives as a predictor of language and educational performance, as well as its role in the social and emotional development of children. The importance of narratives in enhancing language and communication across the curriculum in children and young people with Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) will be discussed. The value of narratives as an assessment tool, both standardised and non-standardised, and as an intervention, in enhancing language and communication across the lifespan, is explored, as well as its utility in measuring outcomes.

A critical overview of the evidence base for narrative therapy with children and young people with SLCN will be discussed. Strategies to facilitate narrative skills across abilities and ages will be highlighted. There will also be time for further discussion and questions around specific client groups or individual cases, as well as exploration of future implications and directions for research and clinical and educational practice.

SIGN UP FOR THE WORKSHOP (required): The workshop is free of charge and open to all, space permitting. A lunch and coffee break refreshments will be provided. Please sign up by March 15 using this form: Clinical Workshop Registration Form

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Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the basic parts of an elevator speech.
  • Create an effective elevator speech.

An elevator speech is to oral communication what a Twitter message (limited to 140 characters) is to written communication. It has to engage and interest the listener, inform and/or persuade, and be memorable (Howell, L., 2006). An elevator speech is a presentation that persuades the listener in less than thirty seconds, or around a hundred words. It takes its name from the idea that in a short elevator ride (of perhaps ten floors), carefully chosen words can make a difference. In addition to actual conversations taking place during elevator rides, other common examples include the following:

  • An entrepreneur making a brief presentation to a venture capitalist or investor
  • A conversation at the water cooler
  • Comments during intermission at a basketball game
  • A conversation as you stroll across the parking lot

Creating an Elevator Speech

An elevator speech does not have to be a formal event, though it can be. An elevator speech is not a full sales pitch and should not get bloated with too much information. The idea is not to rattle off as much information as possible in a short time, nor to present a “canned” thirty-second advertising message, but rather to give a relaxed and genuine “nutshell” summary of one main idea. The speech can be generic and nonspecific to the audience or listener, but the more you know about your audience, the better. When you tailor your message to that audience, you zero in on your target and increase your effectiveness (Albertson, E., 2008). The emphasis is on brevity, but a good elevator speech will address several key questions:

  • What is the topic, product or service?
  • Who are you?
  • Who is the target market? (if applicable)
  • What is the revenue model? (if applicable)
  • What or who is the competition and what are your advantages?

Table 14.7 “Parts of an Elevator Speech” adapts the five parts of a speech to the format of the elevator speech.

Table 14.7 Parts of an Elevator Speech

  • How are you doing?
  • Great! Glad you asked. I’m with (X Company) and we just received this new (product x)—it is amazing. It beats the competition hands down for a third of the price. Smaller, faster, and less expensive make it a winner. It’s already a sales leader. Hey, if you know anyone who might be interested, call me! (Hands business card to the listener as visual aid)

Key Takeaway

You often don’t know when opportunity to inform or persuade will present itself, but with an elevator speech, you are prepared!

  • Pick a product or service and prepare an elevator speech (less than a hundred words, no more than thirty seconds). Rehearse the draft out loud to see how it sounds and post or present it in class.
  • Find an example of an elevator speech online (YouTube, for example) and review it. Post the link and a brief summary of strengths and weaknesses. Share and compare with classmates.
  • Prepare an elevator speech (no more than thirty seconds) and present to the class.

Albertson, E. (2008). How to open doors with a brilliant elevator speech . New Providence, NJ: R. R. Bowker.

Howell, L. (2006). Give your elevator speech a lift . Bothell, WA: Publishers Network.

Business Communication for Success: Public Speaking Edition Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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  1. Informative Speech

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  2. Business Speech: Types with Examples, Informative, Special, Persuasive

    speech on business communication

  3. Chapter 1: Effective Business Communication

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  4. Infographic: 5 Tips for Communicating Effectively

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  5. 8 Business Communication Trends to Look Forward to for 2021

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  6. 7 Steps to Effective Business Communication

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VIDEO

  1. Communication Speech 2023

  2. Business Communication/MBA Communication in organisation, Business Communication

  3. My speech on Personal Branding at Business English Conversation Group meeting

  4. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION (Part-1)

  5. Motivational speech "Business to success"

  6. What is speech? || Technical Communication || aktu || Dr. Mohit Tiwari || #aktu #tech

COMMENTS

  1. Business Speech: Types with Examples, Informative, Special, Persuasive

    A speech that is delivered in the workplace or in any business organization for some specific purpose is known as Business Speech. This is one of the forms of Business Communication and the audience has to sit quietly while the speech is being delivered.

  2. 14.7 Sample Persuasive Speech

    Key Takeaway A speech to persuade presents an attention statement, an introduction, the body of the speech with main points and supporting information, a conclusion, and a residual message. Exercises Apply this framework to your persuasive speech. Prepare a three- to five-minute presentation to persuade and present it to the class.

  3. 11.4 Informative Speech

    11.4 Informative Speech Learning Objectives Discuss and provide examples of ways to incorporate ethics in a speech. Construct an effective speech to inform. Discuss the parts of an informational presentation. Understand the five parts of any presentation.

  4. 13.5 Preparing Your Speech to Inform

    Learning Objectives Discuss and provide examples of ways to incorporate ethics in a speech. Construct an effective speech to inform. Now that we've covered issues central to the success of your informative speech, there's no doubt you want to get down to work. Here are five final suggestions to help you succeed. Start with What You Know

  5. 5.3 Building a Sample Speech

    5.3 Building a Sample Speech - Business Communication for Success: Public Speaking Edition Learning Objectives Demonstrate how to build a sample speech by expanding on the main points you wish to convey. Demonstrate how to use the five structural parts of any speech.

  6. 12.3 Building a Sample Speech

    12.3 Building a Sample Speech - Business Communication for Success: GVSU Edition about how Pressbooks supports open publishing practices. 12.3 Building a Sample Speech Learning Objectives Demonstrate how to build a sample speech by expanding on the main points you wish to convey. Demonstrate how to use the five structural parts of any speech.

  7. Developing an Effective Speech

    Developing an Effective Speech | Business Communication Skills for Managers Developing an Effective Speech Learning Outcomes Identify the five steps of developing an effective speech Let's assume you see the value in developing public speaking as a skill. Where do you start?

  8. 7.5: Speech Tips and Techniques

    Business Communication Skills for Managers (Lumen) 7: Public Speaking 7.5: Speech Tips and Techniques ... What you'll learn to do: Discuss tips and tricks to giving an effective speech. We're living in a time where ideas—learning and sharing—are essential skills. According to communication coach and bestselling author Carmine Gallo ...

  9. 12.3: Building a Sample Speech

    With the luxury of time for preparation, each step can even be further developed. Remember the five-finger model of public speaking, as summarized in Table 12.3.1 12.3. 1, and you will always stand out as a more effective speaker. Table 12.3.1 12.3. 1: Five-Finger Model of Public Speaking. Attention Statement.

  10. 14.7: Sample Persuasive Speech

    Imagine that you have been assigned to give a persuasive presentation lasting five to seven minutes. Follow the guidelines in Table 14.7.1 14.7. 1 and apply them to your presentation. Choose a product or service that interests you so much that you would like to influence the audience's attitudes and behavior toward it.

  11. Business Speech

    By Richard Daniels Reading Time: 8 mins Updated August 18, 2020 Business Speech: Every individual is familiar with the idea of a business speech that what is business speech, its purpose and its importance.

  12. Chapter 1: Effective Business Communication

    What patterns do you observe in the responses? Write a paragraph that addresses at least one observation. Communication is an activity, skill, and art that incorporates lessons learned across a wide spectrum of human knowledge. Perhaps the most time-honored form of communication is storytelling.

  13. Building a Sample Speech

    The speech may be published in a book or newspaper, recorded in an audio file, or recorded on video. It may be a political speech, a business speech, or even a commercial sales pitch. Read or listen to the speech and identify the five structural elements as this speaker has used them, noting specifically where they could improve their performance.

  14. What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

    Read more on Business communication or related topics Power and influence, Presentation skills and Public speaking Carmine Gallo is a Harvard University instructor, keynote speaker, and author of ...

  15. 274 Speech Topics for Business [Persuasive, Informative]

    Persuasive Informative List of Business Speech Topics Persuasive Your business will fail if you do not have good people skills. In business both short and long-term goals are important. Introverts are better entrepreneurs. Market research is a key to starting a business. Every business person needs a mentor. You must have a business plan.

  16. 11.2 Speaking In A Business Setting: Elevator Speech

    Speaking to Executives/Supervisors. Upward Communication includes speeches, proposals, or briefings that are directed at audience members who hold higher positions in the organizational hierarchy than the sender.Upward communication is usually the most lacking within an organization, so it is important to take advantage of the opportunity and use it to your advantage (Nichols & Stevens, 1999).

  17. 12.4 Sample Speech Outlines

    Key Takeaway An outline is a framework that helps the speaker to organize ideas and tie them to the main structural elements of the speech. Exercises The next time you attend a class lecture, try to take notes in outline form, using the sample outlines in this chapter as a guide.

  18. 14.8 Elevator Speech

    An elevator speech is to oral communication what a Twitter message (limited to 140 characters) is to written communication. It has to engage and interest the listener, inform and/or persuade, and be memorable (Howell, L., 2006). An elevator speech is a presentation that persuades the listener in less than thirty seconds, or around a hundred words.

  19. What is Speech Communication? Characteristics of a Good Speech

    Speech is an important medium of oral communication by which message is sent to the audience orally from the speaker. A speech is a public speaking delivered by a speaker on some occasions. It is a formal talking before a large number of people but is can be informal also.

  20. 5.4 Sample Speech Outlines

    5.4 Sample Speech Outlines - Business Communication for Success: Public Speaking Edition Learning Objective Chances are you have learned the basic principles of outlining in English writing courses: an outline is a framework that organizes main ideas and subordinate ideas in a hierarchical series of roman numerals and alphabetical letters.

  21. The Art Of Communication In Business: Lessons From Famous Quotes

    Communication is a pillar—if not the singular foundation of success—in business and in life. When I started my career in America as a Polish immigrant, I did not merely struggle with ...

  22. 7.3 Movement in Your Speech

    In a classical speech presentation, positions on the stage serve to guide both the speaker and the audience through transitions. The speaker's triangle (see Figure 11.3 "Speaker's Triangle") indicates where the speaker starts in the introduction, moves to the second position for the first point, across for the second point, then returns to the original position to make the third point ...

  23. The 2024 State of Business Communication Report: What You ...

    February 21, 2024. This year promises to bring transformational benefits in the ways we communicate and the ways we work—for those who seize the opportunity. When we released our first State of Business Communication report in 2022, we found that miscommunication in the workplace costs US businesses an estimated $1.2 trillion every year.

  24. How to benefit from the conversations you have at work

    Stop thinking about your next point and listen to the one being made. S uccessful workplaces are usually characterised by good communication. Bosses provide a clear sense of where they want the ...

  25. 12.5 Organizing Principles for Your Speech

    Table 12.6 Sample Organizing Principles for a Speech. Organizing Principle. Explanation. Applied Example. 1. Time (Chronological) Structuring your speech by time shows a series of events or steps in a process, which typically has a beginning, middle, and end. "Once upon a time stories" follow a chronological pattern.

  26. The 2024 Scaringi Lecture Series in Speech Language Pathology

    McGill's School of Communication Sciences and Disorders is proud to be hosting a research talk on enhancing the language of adolescents with DLD and a workshop on using narratives in clinical assessment and intervention. These events are funded by the Scaringi Lecture Series grant. This year the events are also co-sponsored by the FRQSC group on Cognitive plasticity and language acquisition.

  27. 9.8 Elevator Speech

    An elevator speech is to oral communication what a Twitter message (limited to 140 characters) is to written communication. It has to engage and interest the listener, inform and/or persuade, and be memorable (Howell, L., 2006). An elevator speech is a presentation that persuades the listener in less than thirty seconds, or around a hundred words.

  28. AT&T says service has been restored after massive, nationwide outage

    AT&T's network went down for many of its customers across the United States Thursday morning, leaving customers unable to place calls, text or access the internet. By late morning, the company ...