• About the library
  • Library Development Plan
  • Book Selection Policy
  • Library Loan Policy
  • Library Rules
  • Internet Rules
  • Reading lists for 1Y - 6Y
  • New books in the library
  • Quick Links
  • Business & LCVP
  • Home Economics
  • Mathematics
  • Religious Education
  • Dublin City Library
  • Dun-Laoghaire Rathdown Library
  • South Dublin Library
  • National Library of Ireland
  • Search our Library Catalogue
  • Cite a Source...
  • Cite it Right!
  • Evaluate Information Sources
  • Reading Blog

Home Economics links

Food studies assignments, home economics study guides, food studies, home design & management, osteoporosis, resource management & consumer studies, social studies, autumn writing competition - results..., the great reads award 2023, author visit: méabh collins, library annual report 2022-2023.

Home Economics

A long and diverse course, this subject is a lot more than just cooking. 

Don't forget to practice Question 1(a) from Section B where you have to analyze a graph or chart. These type of questions will not appear in your textbook. Don't forget to study all topics in your elective. Part (a) is compulsory so if you cut corners you can get caught out. Students who do Biology and Business will find some overlapping topics which makes things easier. 

Higher Level Course Content:

  • Consumer Studies
  • Diet & Health
  • Elective 1: Energy & Emissions
  • Elective 1: Heating, Water, Lighting..
  • Elective 1: Housing (Planning, building..)
  • Elective 1: Interior Design
  • Elective 2: Fabrics
  • Elective 2: Patterns & Fashion
  • Elective 3: (un)employment & Poverty
  • Elective 3: Education in Ireland
  • Elective 3: Family Life & Leisure
  • Environment
  • Food Assignments
  • Food Industry & Packaging
  • Food Spoilage & Food Safety
  • Foods: Meat, Fish, Cereal, Fruit/Veg, Dairy, Eggs
  • Household Appliances
  • Household Finances
  • Marriage & Family Law
  • Meal Planning & Preparation
  • Nutrition: Carbohydrates
  • Nutrition: Lipids
  • Nutrition: Protein
  • Nutrition: Vitamins and Minerals

Ordinary Level Course Content:

  • Elective1: Energy & Emissions
  • Elective1: Heating, Water, Lighting..
  • Elective1: Interior Design
  • Elective1: Irish Housing
  • Elective2: Fabrics
  • Elective2: Patterns & Fashion
  • Elective3: (un)employment & Poverty
  • Elective3: Education in Ireland
  • Elective3: Family Life & Leisure
  • Older Persons

Practical Coursework   - 20%

This is worth 20% of the final mark this is submitted in journal form in sixth year.

Written Exam paper – 80%

The written examination is a two-and-a-half hour exam at both levels and has three sections:

Section A (60 marks)

12 short questions and you're marked on you're best 10.  These deal mainly with all the core areas. 

Section B (180 marks)

5 questions of which you must answer question 1 (Food Science and Nutrition) and any other 2 questions (from the other Core Areas).  

Section C (80 marks)

3 questions of which you must answer one question, an elective question based on your chosen elective.

Future Careers with Leaving Certificate Home Economics

Home Economics is not an essential requirement for any courses in the CAO system but teaches useful cooking skills that will be used by all. Future careers include Fashion, Cookery, Chef, Tourism, Business, Social Work.

Download the Leaving Cert Home Economics Syllabus

Download the Leaving Cert Home Economics Chief Examiner's Report (2017) 

Download the Leaving Cert Home Economics Guidlines for Teachers

Past Papers

Community activity.

LC 2017 Home Economics Food Studies

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

Related documents

Home Economics - Scientific and Social

Add this document to collection(s)

You can add this document to your study collection(s)

Add this document to saved

You can add this document to your saved list

Suggest us how to improve StudyLib

(For complaints, use another form )

Input it if you want to receive answer

  • Home Economics

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

Brief overview of the subject: Home Economics Scientific & Social

Leaving Certificate home economics provides students with knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes necessary for managing their own lives, for further and higher education and work. The learning experiences in home economics develop flexibility and adaptability in students, prepare them for a consumer-oriented society and provide a learning foundation for a wide range of careers in food, textiles, science, design, social studies and tourism. This syllabus is for students in the senior cycle of post-primary education and is assessed at Higher and Ordinary levels.

Level Differentiation The syllabus has been designed as a common syllabus for Ordinary and Higher levels.

Some material has been designated Higher level only.  The text book indicates clearly what material is Higher Level only.

Number of classes per week: 5

Expected hours of homework/outside study per week: 2.5 hours (min)

Main areas of study:

The syllabus is based on a core of three areas of study that is studied by all students and one elective area, from a choice of three.

Core – 80%

Food studies – 45%

• To enable students to have the knowledge and understanding of food and food-related issues necessary for personal and family health and to apply this knowledge and understanding to the wider area of the food industry

• To enable students to develop and extend organisational, manipulative and creative skills in relation to the preparation, cooking and presentation of food

Resource management and consumer studies – 25%

• To enable students to develop and apply the management skills necessary for the effective organisation and management of available resources to satisfy personal and family needs

• To enable students to have the knowledge and skills necessary to be discerning and responsible consumers

Social studies -10%

• To enable students to understand sociological factors affecting the individual and families

Electives – 20% The elective allows students the opportunity to undertake a more detailed study of one area of the core.

There are three electives, from which one may be chosen:

Home design and management Textiles, fashion and design Social studies Social studies

• To allow students to further develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to certain aspects of the core, particularly social studies

• To provide students with knowledge and understanding of the social issues that relate to the family, education, work, unemployment, leisure, and poverty

• To enable students to develop the skills to analyse and interpret material as a basis for expressing and communicating balanced viewpoints

·       Leaving Certificate Home Economics – Scientific and Social is assessed, at Ordinary and Higher level in the form of a terminal written examination and an assessment of practical work, which is an integral part of the study of home economics.

Written Exam paper – 80% (higher & ordinary level)

The exam is 2 hours 30 minutes in duration.

The written examination consists of three sections:

·       Section A 12 short questions – Students answer 10. These deal with all the core areas of practice. (60 marks allocated)

·       Section B 5 questions – Students are to answer Question 1 (Food Science and Nutrition) and any other 2 questions (from the other Core Areas). (180 marks allocated)

·       Section C 3 questions – Students are to answer 1 Elective question, based on which Elective was chosen to do in class. (80 marks allocated)

Practical Coursework – 20% (common level)

Five assignments will be issued to the school at the beginning of Fifth Year. Students are required to complete four assignments from the following five areas of practice: –          A Application of nutritional principles

–          B Food preparation and cooking processes

–          C Food technology

–          D Properties of a food

–          E Comparative analysis

Students are required to document each assignment in a Food Studies Practical Coursework Journal. The completed Food Studies Practical Coursework Journal must be submitted for examination in November of the Leaving Certificate year. Different assignments are issued each year by the State Examinations Commission. Assignments are common to Higher and Ordinary levels. Skills Required:

Time management, organisation, discipline to work independently, problem solving, adaptability, analysis and application, investigation, and a strong work ethic.

It would be advisable for students opting for Leaving Certificate Home Economics to have completed the Junior Certificate course.  Some of the areas covered on the Junior Cert Home Economics course are continued at Leaving Certificate level.

Cross-curricular links: English, Biology, Business Studies, Art, Building Construction, History, Geography

Link to syllabus :

http://www.curriculumonline.ie

  Department Members:

Monica Keating

Geraldine Newell

Textbooks for Current cohort for Relevant Year groups:

Complete Home Economics by L. Gillick & L.Healy (Educate.ie)

Complete Home Economics Exam Skillbuilder Workbook by L. Gillick & L.Healy (Educate.ie)

Complete Home Economics Food Studies Assignment Guide by L. Gillick & L.Healy (Educate.ie)

Exam papers

Hardback A4 Copy

A4 Plastic Cover for Cookery Journal

During the year, students need to bring in ingredients for practical cookery classes

Useful Websites and Online Resources:

www.examinations.ie

Career opportunities :

The learning experiences in home economics develop flexibility and adaptability in students, prepare them for a consumer-oriented society and provide a learning foundation for a wide range of careers in food, textiles, science, design, social studies, education and tourism:

1. Teaching

2. Food Industry- Chef, sensory analyst, baker, waitress, health &

safety hygienist

3. Textiles & Design Industry

5. Nutrition & Dietician

6. Hotel Management Business Management

7. Culinary Travel and Tourism

8. Social Care and childcare

9. Exercise and Health Instructing

10. Health Promotion

11. Interior Design

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

  • Design & Communication Graphics
  • Construction Studies
  • Engineering
  • Agricultural Science
  • Business Studies
  • Technical Graphics
  • Materials Technology (Wood)
  • Social and Personal Health Education
  • Civic, Social and Political Education
  • Religious Education
  • Physical Education
  • 094 9023060
  • davittcollege@msletb.ie

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

  • Data Access Form

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

Davitt College

A dynamic and vibrant centre of teaching and learning under the patronage of Mayo Sligo Leitrim Education & Training Board (MSLETB)

Home Economics

Home Economics has a direct relevance to the lives of every young person, both now and in the future.

Home Economics is an applied subject combining theory with practice in order to develop understanding and problem solving skills. It is concerned with the way individuals and families manage their resources to meet physical, emotional, intellectual, social and economic needs. The subject focuses on the acquisition and the development of skills and attitudes that will enable students to take control of their own lives at present and in the future, whether that be at home, in further education, in the world of work or other life situations.

We live in a society of constant change, the wide range of learning experiences to which students are exposed will allow them to be flexible and adaptable in the changing situations of modern life. It prepares students of both sexes for a life in a consumer dominated society and provides a learning foundation for those seeking employment in a wide range of careers.

As a department we seek to ensure that the social and personal confidence, initiative and competence of the young person is developed throughout their years of study.

In Davitt College Home Economics is a popular subject which is offered at both Junior Cycle and Senior Cycle. The school has two fully equipped kitchens.

Home Economics Course Content

The syllabus is based on a core of five areas of study that will be studied by all students and one optional study, from a choice of three.

  • Food studies and culinary skills
  • Consumer Studies
  • Social and health studies
  • Resource management and home studies
  • Textiles studies

Optional Study

The optional study allows students the opportunity to undertake a more detailed study of one of the core. One optional study may be chosen from the following three:

  • Design and craftwork
  • Textile skills are an extension of textile studies.

Leaving Cert Home Economics

Most of the work on the Junior Cert course forms the basis for Leaving Certificate Home Economics. Students are required to complete a Food Studies Journal in 5th Year which is based on five Cookery Assignments. This is submitted to the Department of Science at the beginning of 6th Year and is accounts for 20% of the overall leaving cert grade in Home Economics. The study of Home Economics compliments the study of Biology and Business.

Leaving Certificate Home Economics is essential for entry to B Ed in Home Economics, required for teaching Home Economics and is recommended for Faille Ireland courses e.g. Hotel and Tourism Management, Event Management, Professional Cookery, Receptionist, Bar Management etc. Home Economics also has links with Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Food Innovation, Health Promotion and Physical Education, Bioscience, Environmental Health, Nursing, Early Childcare Studies and Interior Design.

Assessment:

Junior Certificate

Home Economics is assessed, at Ordinary and Higher Level, through three different methods of assessment.

Higher Level

Written Exam: 50%

Food studies practical examination: 35%

An elective study project: 15%

Ordinary Level

Written Exam: 40%

Food studies practical examination: 45%

Leaving Certificate

Home Economics Practical Coursework Journal 20%

Written Exam 80% [/one_half]

[one_half_last]

Ethnic Cookery

Ethnic

Cupcake Decorating

Cupcake2

[/one_half_last]

Privacy Overview

Food Studies Research Network

Food studies: an interdisciplinary journal.

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal explores new possibilities for sustainable food production and human nutrition. It provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of agricultural, environmental, nutritional, health, social, economic, and cultural perspectives on food. Articles range from broad theoretical and global policy explorations to detailed studies of specific human-physiological, nutritional, and social dynamics of food. Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal examines the dimensions of a “new green revolution” that will meet our human needs in a more effective, equitable, and sustainable way in the twenty-first century.

Serial Founded: 2012 ISSN: 2160-1933 (Print) ISSN: 2160-1941 (Online) LCCN Permalink: https://lccn.loc.gov/2011201122 DOI: http://doi.org/10.18848/2160-1933/CGP Publication Frequency: Biannually

Browse Articles

  • Academic Search International (EBSCO)
  • Biological Sciences (Cabell's)
  • Food Science Source (EBSCO)
  • International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (ProQuest)
  • Scopus (Elsevier)
  • The Australian Research Council (ARC)

Members of...

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

Association of American Publishers

The Association of American Publishers (AAP) is the largest U.S. trade association for the consumer, educational, professional and scholarly publishing industry. Our more than 400 member organizations include U.S.-based multinational corporations, independent publishers, university presses, nonprofit publishers, professional and scholarly societies and industry service providers.

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers

Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP) is an international membership trade body that supports and represents not-for-profit organizations and institutions that publish scholarly and professional content. With over 300 members in 30 countries, membership also includes those that work with these publishers.

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

The Society for Scholarly Publishing

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP), founded in 1978, is a nonprofit organization formed to promote and advance communication among all sectors of the scholarly publication community through networking, information dissemination, and facilitation of new developments in the field.

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

Crossref is a not-for-profit membership organization for scholarly publishing. Crossref and its members work to make content easy to find, link, cite, and assess by using online tools and services to improve research communications. Crossref’s goal is to be a trusted collaborative organization with broad network connections; authoritative and innovative in support of a persistent, sustainable infrastructure for scholarly communication.

home economics food studies practical coursework journal

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals Publishers Compact

We are proud to be a signatory to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals Publishers Compact . Launched in collaboration with the International Publishers Association , the compact “features 10 action points that publishers, publishing associations, and others can commit to undertaking in order to accelerate progress to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. Signatories aspire to develop sustainable practices and act as champions of the SDGs, publishing books and journals that will help inform, develop and inspire action in that direction.

Monthly Newsletter

Subscribe to receive monthly updates by email about conferences, publications, and news from the field.

Stay Connected

Get support.

Have a question? We’re here to help. Visit the help center to get started.

  • Common Ground Research Networks

University of Illinois Research Park 60 Hazelwood Drive Champaign, IL 61820 USA

Phone: +1-217-328-0405 Fax: +1-217-328-0435 Email: [email protected]

Terms and Conditions

2024 Conference

  • Special Focus
  • Call for Papers
  • Event Microsite Guide
  • Special Events
  • Registration
  • Emerging Scholar Awards
  • Hotel & Accommodations
  • Past Editions
  • Call for Articles
  • Editorial Board
  • Impact Statements
  • Publishing Ethics Guidelines
  • Rights & Permissions
  • Open Access Options
  • Editing Services
  • Become an Author
  • Call for Reviewers
  • Call for Series Curators
  • Open Access
  • Managing Editor
  • From the Field
  • Imagining Futures
  • Become a Member
  • Scope & Concerns
  • Advisory Board
  • Our Partners

Common Ground’s Knowledge Communities

Aging & social change research network, the arts in society research network, information, medium & society – the publishing studies research network, climate change: impacts & responses research network, communication & media studies research network, constructed environment research network, design principles & practices research network, diversity in organizations, communities & nations research network, e-learning & innovative pedagogies research network, global studies research network, health, wellness & society research network, law enforcement training and education, the image research network, the inclusive museum research network, interdisciplinary social sciences research network, the learner research network, new directions in the humanities research network, on sustainability research network, organization studies research network, religion in society research network, sport & society research network, technology, knowledge & society research network, tourism and leisure studies research network.

All content © 2024 Common Ground Research Networks . Built with care by &Phil; .

Home Economics, Social and Scientific

Subject Content

The syllabus consists of Core Areas, Practical Coursework and Electives.

The Core Areas

1 . Food Studies - 45% 2.  Resource Management and Consumer Studies - 25% 3.  Social Studies - 10%

Along with the Core Areas, a mandatory section comprises of Practical Coursework must be completed during the two years and will be sent to the Department of Education and Science for inspection. 

This is 20% of the final examination marks. The advantage of this element is that it is mainly completed in 5 th year and submitted in November of 6 th year, in booklet form…months before other subject coursework, which gives the Home Economics class an advantage of having 20% work completely done well before mocks, oral exams etc. begin.

1. Home Design and Management, 2. Textiles, Fashion and Design or 3. Social Studies

Students opt for  one Elective area only.  Those choosing the Textiles, Fashion and Design elective must produce a garment which will be inspected and graded.

The Elective areas are extensions of the content contained in the Core Areas and provide students with the opportunity to study certain topics in more depth.

Here in the College, we concentrate on the Social Elective as students tend to be interested in this area and have a natural knowledge on the topics already from social media and life experience. Topics covered include Education, Employment, Leisure and Poverty.

Exam Structure

The Leaving Certificate Home Economics (Social and Scientific) revised syllabus is examined as follows:

1.  Written Exam paper – 80% The written examination consists of three sections:

Section A 12 short questions – Students answer 10.  These deal mainly with all the Core Areas of practice. (60 marks allocated)

Section B 5 questions - Students are to answer Question 1 (Food Science and Nutrition) and any other 2 questions (from the other Core Areas).  (180 marks allocated)

Section C 3 questions - Students are to answer one Elective question, based on the Elective Social Studies, which we choose to do as already stated.  (80 marks allocated)

2.  Practical Coursework - 20%

This is worth 20% of the final mark – this is submitted in booklet form earlier in the Leaving Certificate year. 

It would be advisable for students opting for Leaving Certificate Home Economics to have completed the Junior Cycle course, but it is not essential.  Some of the areas covered on the Junior Cycle Home Economics course are continued at Leaving Certificate level.

Those students who opt for Transition Year will be introduced to the Food Science and Nutrition section – an overall view of the Junior Cycle Food Section is mainly covered.

Much of the course is theory based – students are often under the illusion that “it’s all cooking” and find it quite a shock when they realise even the Practical Section has to be written up and presented – because there is no Practical Examination as at Junior Certificate Level.

It is a wide course, covering many life skills.  I find students enjoy the subject, but they must be willing to learn and to undertake quite a substantial theoretical subject. There is both an Honours and Ordinary level within the subject.  Students’ can opt to take the written exam at Higher or Ordinary level, however the Coursework Journal is at a general level and is corrected as such.

There is also a link with some other subjects, namely Business Studies, Biology and even Religion – again, this cross-curricular advantage is helpful when choosing subjects.

Improving the quality of investment processes in Moscow’s economy

  • Regional Problems
  • Published: 21 February 2013
  • Volume 24 , pages 60–66, ( 2013 )

Cite this article

  • A. V. Safronov 1  

41 Accesses

Explore all metrics

The paper proposes ways of using data on actually executed investments in fixed assets in the work of state auditors in order to solve two practical problems: estimating the volumes of tax revenues from the property of organizations and concluding on the degree of reliability of feasibility studies on the city’s participation in the authorized capital of economic entities. An original methodology, based on considering regularities in the process of reproduction in fixed assets, is proposed for estimating increases in tax receipts.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this article

Price includes VAT (Russian Federation)

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Rent this article via DeepDyve

Institutional subscriptions

A. I. Gladyshevskii, Forecasting Reproductive Processes in the Economy (Investment Aspect) (MAKS Press, Moscow, 2004).

Google Scholar  

Yu. V. Yaremenko, Theory and Methodology of Multi-Industry Economic Studies (Nauka, Moscow, 2000).

Download references

Author information

Authors and affiliations.

Chamber of Control and Accounts of Moscow, Moscow, Russia

A. V. Safronov

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

Additional information

Original Russian Text © A.V. Safronov, 2013.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Safronov, A.V. Improving the quality of investment processes in Moscow’s economy. Stud. Russ. Econ. Dev. 24 , 60–66 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1134/S1075700713010103

Download citation

Received : 14 June 2012

Published : 21 February 2013

Issue Date : January 2013

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1134/S1075700713010103

Share this article

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

  • RUSSIAN Economic Development
  • Investment Project
  • Fixed Asset
  • State Auditor
  • Investment Expenditure
  • Find a journal
  • Publish with us
  • Track your research

Roundtable in Moscow

Pamela Teitelbaum

Landing in Moscow in the late afternoon December 5, 2012 was the beginning of a short trip marked by the first-ever Roundtable on Girlhood Studies: Agendas and Prospects in Russia. This day-long roundtable was a part of a two-day long conference entitled “The 21st Century Woman: New Opportunities and New Challenges”. This roundtable held on 7 December 2012 was organized as a collaboration between Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, the Gorbachev Foundation, and the Heinrich Böll Foundation hosted by the International Foundation for Socio-Economic and Journal of Social Policy Studies (The Gorbachev Foundation in Moscow). Best described by Olga Zdravomyslova, Executive Director of the Gorbachev Foundation (Moscow): “The Round Table on Girlhood Studies: Agenda and Prospects is interesting and important for us not only from a theoretical perspective but truly as an interdisciplinary dialogue in relation to girlhood, thereby expanding the vision that has historically taken shape in Russian gender studies. We hope that the Round Table that brought together Russian scholars and young researchers will produce a wider public debate about girls in Russia, as they become a more visible part of the population in modern culture.”

The first day of the conference brought together Russian scholars and nongovernmental organization (NGO) representatives – including Mr. Gorbachev — with international ones from Canada, Germany, and the United to discuss women’s issues and gender studies. Discussions began with presentation topics ranging from the role of women as active citizens during periods of resistance starting within the gulags to more contemporary examples of technology driven activism among women in the United States, and examples of the exploitation and victimization of women in Claudia Mitchell’s presentation that began with a narrative regarding the mass murder of 14 young women engineering students in Montreal during the 1989 École Polytechnique Massacre. The end of the first day culminated with critical examinations of varying perspectives of feminist thought and how to apply a feminist perspective to girlhood studies, as well as my presentation on the critical assessment of how NGOs leading young women and girl-focused virtual communities in Canada and abroad are using and valuing social and digital media. This day was both insightful and critical to current perspectives on women’s participation in the political, social and cultural spheres.

The second day of the conference was organized as a roundtable entitled “Girlhood Studies: Agendas and Prospects”. Claudia Mitchell and I were keynote speakers for this event, invited by Olga Zdravomyslova, Executive Director of the Gorbachev Foundation (Moscow). The Roundtable speakers included eight Russian scholars and journal editors/publishers from Moscow, St. Petersburg, Samsara and Saratov. There were an eclectic variety of presentations examining and investigating areas of girlhood studies from the evolution of scholarly developments that saw the launch of the Girlhood Studies: an Interdisciplinary Journal to critically investigating the linkages between girl-friendly organizations through their use of online communities. There were presentations on the lack of girl-specific demographic research in Russia, and the representation of ‘the girl’ in Russian films focused on the girl/teacher social and cultural dynamic. Other presentations examined the traditional and modern dress for young girls in Russia; and finally, an overview of historical developments that have put girlhood studies on the table in Russia. As Olga Zdravomyslova commented in her pre-conference notes:

“A new generation of girls is fast entering into the social life in Russia. This is the generation of the Internet, social networks and global mass culture. They speak in a different voice, raise new issues and seek to get answers to them. It seems, they are really new generation – pushing, independent, self-reliant and they are more sensitive towards gender equality issue and feminist thinking. Indeed, they are amazingly diverse and we know very little about them. Despite the fact that gender studies in Russia emerged in the early 1990s and have already become a multidisciplinary research area, Girlhood studies have always been fragmented and dispersed in them – girls are still very rarely seen by Russian researchers as a separate age and gender group. It can be safely said that girlhood studies have not grown beyond the boundaries of traditional descriptive approaches whereby girlhood is viewed as a closed, undeveloped world, a “pre-life”. It’s as if girls are denied the right to reflect or act. However today, Russian society is increasingly concerned about the ways girls move into adulthood – and sometimes falls into moral panic, shows an over-sensitive or even aggressive reaction to girls’ unexpected advocacy or other offbeat patterns of behaviour.”

It was an honour to be invited to collaborate and participate in these historical events. It was only once the two-day activities began that we truly understood the significance of this dialogue among academics, researchers, journal publishers and practitioners from a variety of disciplines and sectors of society within the Russian context. As a relatively new field of study within Russia, girlhood research is rather sparse. However, the scholars and practitioners participating in the Roundtable were deeply dedicated and committed to discussing what steps are needed to push a girlhood agenda forward within their national and local contexts. Therefore, the significance of the roundtable was enriching and enlightening in terms of contributions to this field in general. One foundational and critical piece of knowledge that emerged out of these discussions during this valuable event was the need to further consider how to “grow a girlhood field of study if there is no advocacy for this field along the way”. Questions continued to focus on “what is girlhood in the 21st century? What does it look like? What do we need to know? and How do we need to know it?” specifically in the context of Russia.

The Roundtable ended with people feeling a sense of accomplishment. The general attitude seemed to be one of ‘looking forward’ towards critical discussions on how to create change in the near future. Change that sees girlhood studies as a staple interdisciplinary field of academic research on the campuses of Russian universities and research institutes, and written into the pages of academic peer-reviewed journals that examine the Russian social, political, economic and cultural spheres.

We left the Gorbachev Foundation that snowy evening in Moscow with a sense of excitement and ideas for collaborative opportunities, for working further with these exceptionally dedicated scholars and NGO representatives. For further information about The Gorbachev Foundation in Moscow, please go to ENGLISH: http://www.gorby.ru/en/presscenter/news/show_29193/  

RUSSIAN: http://www.gorby.ru/presscenter/news/show_29193/

Video Icon

  • CEU PU - Deutsch
  • Közép-európai Egyetem

JS Lecture Series - Gennady Estraikh - Yiddish Cultural Life in Post-Stalinist Moscow

The Central European University

Jewish Studies Program

cordially invites you to a lecture by

Gennady Estraikh

(New York University)

Yiddish Cultural Life in Post-Stalinist Moscow

Following the full destruction of Jewish cultural institutions in the last years of Stalin’s rule, the Soviet authorities resisted any revival of Yiddish publishing. The change came in 1959, when a Moscow-printed collection of Sholem Aleichem’s stories marked the classic author’s centenary, and then in 1961, when the Soviet Writers’ Union launched the Yiddish literary journal Sovetish Heymland. Although Moscow housed two Yiddish theater troupes, the journal epitomized the Yiddish cultural life of the Soviet capital and, generally, the Soviet Union. Gennady Estraikh, who worked as Managing Editor of the journal, will describe and analyze the Yiddish-speaking intellectual milieu of the final four decades of the Soviet period.

Tuesday, January 17 at 6 p.m.

Gellner room, monument building.

Gennady Estraikh is a Professor at the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, New York University, where he also directs the Shvidler Project for the History of the Jews of the Soviet Union. His fields of expertise are Jewish intellectual history, Yiddish language and literature, and Soviet Jewish history. His publications include the monographs Soviet Yiddish (1999), In Harness: Yiddish Writers’ Romance with Communism (2005), Yiddish in the Cold War (2008), and Yiddish literary life in Moscow (in Russian, 2015), and over a dozen co-edited volumes, such as Translating Sholem Aleichem (2012), 1929: Mapping the Jewish World (2013), Soviet Jews in World War II (2014), and Children and Yiddish Literature (2016).

IMAGES

  1. Home economics practical food studies assignment by Thompson Ashley

    home economics food studies practical coursework journal

  2. LC 2017 Home Economics Food Studies

    home economics food studies practical coursework journal

  3. Complete Home Economics (1st Edition) Food Studies Assignment Guide

    home economics food studies practical coursework journal

  4. Revision Guide Home Economics Food and Nutrition GCSE (Revision Guides

    home economics food studies practical coursework journal

  5. Food and Nutrition Coursework.

    home economics food studies practical coursework journal

  6. 9781908682130: WJEC GCSE Home Economics

    home economics food studies practical coursework journal

VIDEO

  1. HOME ECONOMICS RESEARCH TITLES #shorts #docedpadama

  2. Lesson 06 Basic Economic Activities

  3. sheet 2 economics 2

  4. Home Economics ⎮ Crash Courses: Dinners

  5. ||How to Prepare Economics||

  6. BTLed- Home Economics Courses

COMMENTS

  1. Senior Cycle

    Ms Sheelan Home Economics: Junior Cycle JC Practical Exam Senior Cycle Photos ... Practical Coursework (Journals) Leaving Cert 2016. Food Studies Practical_coursework_journal.docx: File Size: 18 kb: ... food_studies_costing_database.pdf: File Size: 143 kb: File Type: pdf: Download File.

  2. Home Economics Helper Home page

    You have to write up 5 Food Studies Practical Coursework Assignments. You will be given an Examination Journal, which must be completed by you. This will be taken up by the State Examinations Commission in the first term of sixth year. Your fully completed journal represents 20% of your final grade. You must:-

  3. Food Assignments

    Suggest a website. Find Home Ec. past exam papers listed by topic with marking scheme for each question. Study notes, syllabus, sample answers, resources, links and videos within each topic.

  4. Home Economics Education: Preparation for a Sustainable and ...

    Home Economics, as a discipline, aims to achieve healthy and sustainable living for individuals, families, and societies. To support the achievement of this fundamental aim, Home Economics integrates knowledge, problem solving, and practical skills for everyday life with an emphasis on taking decisive action to enhance the overall health and well-being of learners.

  5. PDF Home Economics

    Victorian Journal of Home Economics Volume 55 Number 2 2016 Page 3 The following section takes each of the key changes across the revised Food Studies study design and gives a rationale. Revised VCE Food Studies VCE Food Studies is the study of food and its effects on our daily lives. It takes an interdisciplinary approach to the

  6. Home Economics links

    Home Economics - Practical Food Studies Assignments Journal - Blank. Here is a blank journal to be used for practice drafts. Chief Examiners Report 2017. ... Here is the Table of Contents for the Home Economics Study Guide for 2014/2015. Home Economics Study Guides TOC 2013/2014.

  7. PDF Enhancing Practical Experiences in Home Economics Education Towards

    The study focused on practical experiences in food and nutrition, its ... Home Economics is a Vocational (VTE) course that involves the study of all ... Some Innovative approaches to enhancing Practical Teaching in Home Economics (Food and Nutrition) as stated that by Dada (2007); Inyama, (2008); Ogu, (2008); Mkpughe, (2009) and Zhang, (2015 ...

  8. (PDF) Home Economics as a food education intervention ...

    For example, Japan's obligatory food education called 'Shokuiku' is often covered via HE lessons (Suzuki, 2014), whereas in Canada, 'Home Economics Foods and Nutrition courses provide the only ...

  9. PDF Home Economics Scientific and Social

    Food Studies Practical Coursework General Marking Criteria (to be read in conjunction with Assignments) Investigation: Analysis/Research - 30 marks . Research and analysis = 20. Band A 16-20 marks (very good - excellent) Investigation • shows evidence of a thorough exploration and comprehensive analysis of the

  10. PDF Home Economics

    All Food Studies Practical Coursework Journals presented for assessment must be the candidate's own individual work (verified by the candidate and the class teacher). Any secondary materials (e.g. books, journals, ... the supervision of the Home Economics teacher. If the coursework is not completed under the teacher's

  11. Home Economics

    Higher Level Course Content: Consumer Studies; Diet & Health; Elective 1: Energy & Emissions; Elective 1: Heating, Water, Lighting.. ... Practical Coursework - 20%. ... Future Careers with Leaving Certificate Home Economics. Home Economics is not an essential requirement for any courses in the CAO system but teaches useful cooking skills that ...

  12. LC 2017 Home Economics Food Studies

    M47/48A Coimisiún na Scrúduithe Stáit State Examinations Commission Leaving Certificate Examination 2017 Home Economics - Scientific and Social Food Studies Assignments (20% of Total Marks) General Directions to Candidates Assignments are common to Higher and Ordinary Level. All candidates (Higher and Ordinary) are required to complete and present a record of any four ...

  13. Home Economics Scientific & Social

    Leaving certificate Home Economics is examined in two ways: 1.) Practical Course Work Journal. Students are required to complete five mandatory practical assignments which involve a large amount of research. They document each assignment in a Food Studies Practical Coursework Journal, which is worth 20% of their final examination.

  14. Home Economics

    The completed Food Studies Practical Coursework Journal must be submitted for examination in November of the Leaving Certificate year. ... Some of the areas covered on the Junior Cert Home Economics course are continued at Leaving Certificate level. Cross-curricular links: English, Biology, Business Studies, Art, Building Construction, History ...

  15. Home Economics

    Food studies practical examination: 35%. An elective study project: 15%. Ordinary Level. Written Exam: 40%. Food studies practical examination: 45%. An elective study project: 15%. Leaving Certificate. Home Economics Practical Coursework Journal 20%. Written Exam 80% [/one_half] [one_half_last] Ethnic Cookery

  16. Home Economics

    Practical Coursework - 20% This is worth 20% of the final mark; this is submitted in journal form earlier in the Leaving Certificate year. Career Possibilities This subject provides a good foundation for careers in a wide range of areas including Health, Nutrition, Education, Tourism, Textiles, Design, the Food industry, Science and Social Studies.

  17. Journal

    Common Ground Research Networks. University of Illinois Research Park. 60 Hazelwood Drive. Champaign, IL 61820 USA. Phone: +1-217-328-0405. Email: [email protected]. Food Studies: An International Journal aims to be a definitive resource for research and thinking about food.

  18. Home Economics

    Food Studies - 45% 2. Resource Management and Consumer Studies - 25% 3. Social Studies - 10% . Along with the Core Areas, a mandatory section comprises of Practical Coursework must be completed during the two years and will be sent to the Department of Education and Science for inspection. This is 20% of the final examination marks.

  19. Improving the quality of investment processes in Moscow's economy

    The paper proposes ways of using data on actually executed investments in fixed assets in the work of state auditors in order to solve two practical problems: estimating the volumes of tax revenues from the property of organizations and concluding on the degree of reliability of feasibility studies on the city's participation in the authorized capital of economic entities. An original ...

  20. Roundtable in Moscow

    This roundtable held on 7 December 2012 was organized as a collaboration between Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, the Gorbachev Foundation, and the Heinrich Böll Foundation hosted by the International Foundation for Socio-Economic and Journal of Social Policy Studies (The Gorbachev Foundation in Moscow).

  21. JS Lecture Series

    Although Moscow housed two Yiddish theater troupes, the journal epitomized the Yiddish cultural life of the Soviet capital and, generally, the Soviet Union. Gennady Estraikh, who worked as Managing Editor of the journal, will describe and analyze the Yiddish-speaking intellectual milieu of the final four decades of the Soviet period.

  22. Patriotic Unity and Ethnic Diversity at Odds: The Example of Tatar

    To answer this question, this essay studies the reception of Russian state-promoted patriotism in the 2000s among the Tatar community in Moscow. Looking at the activities of Tatar associations (especially the Regional Tatar National-Cultural Autonomy organisation), it shows the syntheses and compromises negotiated by activists between ...