#1 Text To Speech (TTS) Reader Online

Proudly serving millions of users since 2015

Type or upload any text, file, website & book for listening online, proofreading, reading-along or generating professional mp3 voice-overs.

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Play Text Out Loud

Reads out loud plain text, files, e-books and websites. Remembers text & caret position, so you can come back to listening later, unlimited length, recording and more.

Create Humanlike Voiceovers

Murf is a text-to-speech tool offering 200+ natural voices for creating high-quality voiceovers for e-learning, podcasts, YouTubes & audiobooks, simplifying audio content production.

Additional Text-To-Speech Solutions

Turns your articles, PDFs, emails, etc. into podcasts, so you can listen to it on your own podcast player when convenient, with all the advantages that come with your podcast app.

SpeechNinja says what you type in real time. It enables people with speech difficulties to speak out loud using synthesized voice (AAC) and more.

Battle tested for years, serving millions of users, especially good for very long texts.

Need to read a webpage? Simply paste its URL here & click play. Leave empty to read about the Beatles 🎸

Books & Stories

Listen to some of the best stories ever written. We have them right here. Want to upload your own? Use the main player to upload epub files.

Simply paste any URL (link to a page) and it will import & read it out loud.

Chrome Extension

Reads out loud webpages, directly from within the page.

TTSReader for mobile - iOS or Android. Includes exporting audio to mp3 files.

NEW 🚀 - TTS Plugin

Make your own website speak your content - with a single line of code. Hassle free.

TTSReader Premium

Support our development team & enjoy ad-free better experience. Commercial users, publishers are required a premium license.

TTSReader reads out loud texts, webpages, pdfs & ebooks with natural sounding voices. Works out of the box. No need to download or install. No sign in required. Simply click 'play' and enjoy listening right in your browser. TTSReader remembers your text and position between sessions, so you can continue listening right where you left. Recording the generated speech is supported as well. Works offline, so you can use it at home, in the office, on the go, driving or taking a walk. Listening to textual content using TTSReader enables multitasking, reading on the go, improved comprehension and more. With support for multiple languages, it can be used for unlimited use cases .

Get Started for Free

Main Use Cases

Listen to great content.

Most of the world's content is in textual form. Being able to listen to it - is huge! In that sense, TTSReader has a huge advantage over podcasts. You choose your content - out of an infinite variety - that includes humanity's entire knowledge and art richness. Listen to lectures, to PDF files. Paste or upload any text from anywhere, edit it if needed, and listen to it anywhere and anytime.

Proofreading

One of the best ways to catch errors in your writing is to listen to it being read aloud. By using TTSReader for proofreading, you can catch errors that you might have missed while reading silently, allowing you to improve the quality and accuracy of your written content. Errors can be in sentence structure, punctuation, and grammar, but also in your essay's structure, order and content.

Listen to web pages

TTSReader can be used to read out loud webpages in two different ways. 1. Using the regular player - paste the URL and click play. The website's content will be imported into the player. (2) Using our Chrome extension to listen to pages without leaving the page . Listening to web pages with TTSReader can provide a more accessible, convenient, and efficient way of consuming online content.

Turn ebooks into audiobooks

Upload any ebook file of epub format - and TTSReader will read it out loud for you, effectively turning it into an audiobook alternative. You can find thousands of epub books for free, available for download on Project Gutenberg's site, which is an open library for free ebooks.

Read along for speed & comprehension

TTSReader enables read along by highlighting the sentence being read and automatically scrolling to keep it in view. This way you can follow with your own eyes - in parallel to listening to it. This can boost reading speed and improve comprehension.

Generate audio files from text

TTSReader enables exporting the synthesized speech with a single click. This is available currently only on Windows and requires TTSReader’s premium . Adhering to the commercial terms some of the voices may be used commercially for publishing, such as narrating videos.

Accessibility, dyslexia, etc.

For individuals with visual impairments or reading difficulties, listening to textual content, lectures, articles & web pages can be an essential tool for accessing & comprehending information.

Language learning

TTSReader can read out text in multiple languages, providing learners with listening as well as speaking practice. By listening to the text being read aloud, learners can improve their comprehension skills and pronunciation.

Kids - stories & learning

Kids love stories! And if you can read them stories - it's definitely the best! But, if you can't, let TTSReader read them stories for you. Set the right voice and speed, that is appropriate for their comprehension level. For kids who are at the age of learning to read - this can also be an effective tool to strengthen that skill, as it highlights every sentence being read.

Main Features

Ttsreader is a free text to speech reader that supports all modern browsers, including chrome, firefox and safari..

Includes multiple languages and accents. If on Chrome - you will get access to Google's voices as well. Super easy to use - no download, no login required. Here are some more features

Fun, Online, Free. Listen to great content

Drag, drop & play (or directly copy text & play). That’s it. No downloads. No logins. No passwords. No fuss. Simply fun to use and listen to great content. Great for listening in the background. Great for proof-reading. Great for kids and more. Learn more, including a YouTube we made, here .

Multilingual, Natural Voices

We facilitate high-quality natural-sounding voices from different sources. There are male & female voices, in different accents and different languages. Choose the voice you like, insert text, click play to generate the synthesized speech and enjoy listening.

Exit, Come Back & Play from Where You Stopped

TTSReader remembers the article and last position when paused, even if you close the browser. This way, you can come back to listening right where you previously left. Works on Chrome & Safari on mobile too. Ideal for listening to articles.

Vs. Recorded Podcasts

In many aspects, synthesized speech has advantages over recorded podcasts. Here are some: First of all - you have unlimited - free - content. That includes high-quality articles and books, that are not available on podcasts. Second - it’s free. Third - it uses almost no data - so it’s available offline too, and you save money. If you like listening on the go, as while driving or walking - get our free Android Text Reader App .

Read PDF Files, Texts & Websites

TTSReader extracts the text from pdf files, and reads it out loud. Also useful for simply copying text from pdf to anywhere. In addition, it highlights the text currently being read - so you can follow with your eyes. If you specifically want to listen to websites - such as blogs, news, wiki - you should get our free extension for Chrome

Export Speech to Audio Files

TTSReader enables exporting the synthesized speech to mp3 audio files. This is available currently only on Windows, and requires ttsreader’s premium .

Pricing & Plans

  • Online text to speech player
  • Chrome extension for reading webpages
  • Premium TTSReader.com
  • Premium Chrome extension
  • Better support from the development team

Compare plans

Sister Apps Developed by Our Team

Speechnotes

Dictation & Transcription

Type with your voice for free, or automatically transcribe audio & video recordings

Buttons - Kids Dictionary

Turns your device into multiple push-buttons interactive games

Animals, numbers, colors, counting, letters, objects and more. Different levels. Multilingual. No ads. Made by parents, for our own kids.

Ways to Get In Touch, Feedback & Community

Visit our contact page , for various ways to get in touch with us, send us feedback and interact with our community of users & developers.

SpeechGen.io

Realistic Text-to-Speech AI converter

essay writing to speech

Create realistic Voiceovers online! Insert any text to generate speech and download audio mp3 or wav for any purpose. Speak a text with AI-powered voices.You can convert text to voice for free for reference only. For all features, purchase the paid plans

How to convert text into speech?

  • Just type some text or import your written content
  • Press "generate" button
  • Download MP3 / WAV

Full list of benefits of neural voices

Downloadable tts.

You can download converted audio files in MP3, WAV, OGG for free.

Downloadable TTS

If your Limit balance is sufficient, you can use a single query to convert a text of up to 2,000,000 characters into speech.

Commercial Use

You can use the generated audio for commercial purposes. Examples: YouTube, Tik Tok, Instagram, Facebook, Twitch, Twitter, Podcasts, Video Ads, Advertising, E-book, Presentation and other.

Commercial

Multi-voice editor

Dialogue with AI Voices. You can use several voices at once in one text.

Dialogue editor

Custom voice settings

Change Speed, Pitch, Stress, Pronunciation, Intonation , Emphasis , Pauses and more. SSML support .

Custom voice settings

You spend little on re-dubbing the text. Limits are spent only for changed sentences in the text.

Save money

Over 1000 Natural Sounding Voices

Crystal-clear voice over like a Human. Males, females, children's, elderly voices.

Powerful support

We will help you with any questions about text-to-speech. Ask any questions, even the simplest ones. We are happy to help.

Compatible with editing programs

Works with any video creation software: Adobe Premier, After effects, Audition, DaVinci Resolve, Apple Motion, Camtasia, iMovie, Audacity, etc.

Works with any video creation software

You can share the link to the audio. Send audio links to your friends and colleagues.

tts Sharing

Cloud save your history

All your files and texts are automatically saved in your profile on our cloud server. Add tracks to your favorites in one click.

Cloud save your history

Use our text to voice converter to make videos with natural sounding speech!

Say goodbye to expensive traditional audio creation

Cheap price. Create a professional voiceover in real time for pennies. it is 100 times cheaper than a live speaker.

Traditional audio creation

sound studio

  • Expensive live speakers, high prices
  • A long search for freelancers and studios
  • Editing requires complex tools and knowledge
  • The announcer in the studio voices a long time. It takes time to give him a task and accept it..

speechgen on different devices

  • Affordable tts generation starting at $0.08 per 1000 characters
  • Website accessible in your browser right now
  • Intuitive interface, suitable for beginners
  • SpeechGen generates text from speech very quickly. A few clicks and the audio is ready.

Create AI-generated realistic voice-overs.

Ways to use. Cases.

See how other people are already using our realistic speech synthesis. There are hundreds of variations in applications. Here are some of them.

  • Voice over for videos. Commercial, YouTube, Tik Tok, Instagram, Facebook, and other social media. Add voice to any videos!
  • E-learning material. Ex: learning foreign languages, listening to lectures, instructional videos.
  • Advertising. Increase installations and sales! Create AI-generated realistic voice-overs for video ads, promo, and creatives.
  • Public places. Synthesizing speech from text is needed for airports, bus stations, parks, supermarkets, stadiums, and other public areas.
  • Podcasts. Turn text into podcasts to increase content reach. Publish your audio files on iTunes, Spotify, and other podcast services.
  • Mobile apps and desktop software. The synthesized ai voices make the app friendly.
  • Essay reader. Read your essay out loud to write a better paper.
  • Presentations. Use text-to-speech for impressive PowerPoint presentations and slideshow.
  • Reading documents. Save your time reading documents aloud with a speech synthesizer.
  • Book reader. Use our text-to-speech web app for ebook reading aloud with natural voices.
  • Welcome audio messages for websites. It is a perfect way to re-engage with your audience. 
  • Online article reader. Internet users translate texts of interesting articles into audio and listen to them to save time.
  • Voicemail greeting generator. Record voice-over for telephone systems phone greetings.
  • Online narrator to read fairy tales aloud to children.
  • For fun. Use the robot voiceover to create memes, creativity, and gags.

Maximize your content’s potential with an audio-version. Increase audience engagement and drive business growth.

Who uses Text to Speech?

SpeechGen.io is a service with artificial intelligence used by about 1,000 people daily for different purposes. Here are examples.

Video makers create voiceovers for videos. They generate audio content without expensive studio production.

Newsmakers convert text to speech with computerized voices for news reporting and sports announcing.

Students and busy professionals to quickly explore content

Foreigners. Second-language students who want to improve their pronunciation or listen to the text comprehension

Software developers add synthesized speech to programs to improve the user experience.

Marketers. Easy-to-produce audio content for any startups

IVR voice recordings. Generate prompts for interactive voice response systems.

Educators. Foreign language teachers generate voice from the text for audio examples.

Booklovers use Speechgen as an out loud book reader. The TTS voiceover is downloadable. Listen on any device.

HR departments and e-learning professionals can make learning modules and employee training with ai text to speech online software.

Webmasters convert articles to audio with lifelike robotic voices. TTS audio increases the time on the webpage and the depth of views.

Animators use ai voices for dialogue and character speech.

Text to Speech enables brands, companies, and organizations to deliver enhanced end-user experience, while minimizing costs.

Frequently Asked Questions

Convert any text to super realistic human voices. See all tariff plans .

Supported languages

  • Amharic (Ethiopia)
  • Arabic (Algeria)
  • Arabic (Egypt)
  • Arabic (Saudi Arabia)
  • Bengali (India)
  • Catalan (Spain)
  • English (Australia)
  • English (Canada)
  • English (GB)
  • English (Hong Kong)
  • English (India)
  • English (Philippines)
  • German (Austria)
  • Hindi India
  • Spanish (Argentina)
  • Spanish (Mexico)
  • Spanish (United States)
  • Tamil (India)
  • All languages: +76

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Unit Conversion Blog

Unit Conversion Blog

How To Turn an Essay Into a Speech

How To Turn an Essay Into a Speech

Haruki Murakami famously quotes that sometimes taking time is a shortcut. It is very alluring to take the easier way out instead of working up yourself trying to follow the correct way. However, the result of the two methods is as different as the east is from the west. It never hurts to follow the proper steps for the best outcome, no matter the time taken for completion. It is tempting to read an essay before an audience without any alterations.

An article is meant for reading and not public speaking. However, for adequate comprehension by the audience, a few changes must be made along the way. The language, delivery, information, structure, and other elements must be modified to fit an active audience. The following are ways to turn an essay into a speech .

Divide your essay into manageable sections

Book eyeglasses eyewear page

The smaller your sections are, the more manageable your speech will be. It is easier to work in extracts because the more significant the information, the more complicated it gets. For example, you may divide your introduction into two parts. Given that you are dealing with a live audience, your introduction must be as compelling as possible.

It has to incentivize the audience to listen to what you’re about to say. You can start with a spellbinding short story relating to your topic of interest. Something that will force your audience to give you their time and attention.

Avoid cliché introductions that most people rely upon. Change the narrative and be distinguishable. The transition is also a cardinal skill to master. How you transition from your essential fact or story to the introduction of your topic will prove your dexterity. Go on to introduce your topic, giving a snippet of what you want to talk about without spilling your beans.

It may seem challenging, but there is always someone willing to assist. People appreciate and never forget that helping hand, especially when times are tough. Various paper writers will always be on the lookout for anyone in need of essay writing help.

Shorten your essay

It’s far too common for students to sit in lecture halls, wondering when the lecturer will finish their presentation and end everyone’s misery. This happens when you read an essay before an audience without making the necessary alterations. The goal is to deliver your message and for you to be heard. For people to follow your content from beginning to end, you must not kill them with boredom. To ensure this does not happen, make sure you shorten your essay.

Go into your essay with a red pen and start to cut out anything extraneous. After some changes are made, step away for a while and do something else; then, go back to it and cut some more. This will allow you to see any information you may have missed that is fitting to terminate. Remove any unnecessary information that tends to prolong the speech. Look out for long sentences and try breaking them down.

Through this, you maximize the grasping power of your audience, leaving them with nothing but admiration for you. Delivering the message in point form also improves the understanding of your audience, bringing forth nothing but impeccable results.

Work on your transitions

Person holding blue ballpoint pen writing in notebook

I love Steve Harvey. When I hear his talks, I think about how talented he is. And no question, he sure is. The way he maneuvers from one topic to another is nothing short of admirable. Learning his art would be amazing. You can be as sleek as he is in your speeches with enough practice. If you are still having a hard time writing your speech, you should use speech writing services for the best results.

An essay is usually divided into content or introductory statements and supporting sentences. The supporting sentences flow well with the main idea in a well-written essay. The transition should come as effortlessly as possible. This is what makes an essay readable and alluring, earning you the best mark.

However, the transition in an essay is quite different from that of a speech. Excellent speeches tend to be ones with a few key points and apparent transitions between those points. One idea must tie pleasingly with the other without much struggle. Every issue must connect and relate to the topic in question. It would help if you became more explicit with your transitions.

Be flexible

An address has to be as engaging as possible. Since it deals with a participating audience, adjustments have to be made to consider your audience. There are plenty of ways to engage your audience. An example is through jokes and asking questions. These are used to evaluate whether the audience is following or not. Ensure that you are flexible enough to change the tone and language of your speech concerning the type of audience present. Avoid being rigid. Find ways to spice up your address, leaving your audience with no other option but to follow as you deliver your message.

Wrap up your speech with a memorable conclusion

A woman holding a pen clapping

The best endings resonate because they echo a word, phrase, or image from earlier in the story, and the reader is prompted to think back to that reference and speculate on a deeper meaning. End your speech in style. Set the bar on how people will remember your address. The introduction and the conclusion are where you leave a lasting impression on your audience. There are very many words to choose from. Arranging them to create a magical effect is not the most effortless task.

What you must note is that all good things take time. You can always research the best conclusions to get a clear example to mimic and guide you through. Once you scour the internet, you will find all sorts of guidance, from steps guiding you through converting your essay to a speech to online essay writers on various professional essay writing services.

If you look for solutions diligently, you will find them soon enough, and it would surprise you at how untarnished your work will turn out. Academic writing has never been a smooth joyride, but the countless barriers make the process admirable. Remember, giving up is not an option, so practice until you are perfect.

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How to write a speech that your audience remembers

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Whether in a work meeting or at an investor panel, you might give a speech at some point. And no matter how excited you are about the opportunity, the experience can be nerve-wracking . 

But feeling butterflies doesn’t mean you can’t give a great speech. With the proper preparation and a clear outline, apprehensive public speakers and natural wordsmiths alike can write and present a compelling message. Here’s how to write a good speech you’ll be proud to deliver.

What is good speech writing?

Good speech writing is the art of crafting words and ideas into a compelling, coherent, and memorable message that resonates with the audience. Here are some key elements of great speech writing:

  • It begins with clearly understanding the speech's purpose and the audience it seeks to engage. 
  • A well-written speech clearly conveys its central message, ensuring that the audience understands and retains the key points. 
  • It is structured thoughtfully, with a captivating opening, a well-organized body, and a conclusion that reinforces the main message. 
  • Good speech writing embraces the power of engaging content, weaving in stories, examples, and relatable anecdotes to connect with the audience on both intellectual and emotional levels. 

Ultimately, it is the combination of these elements, along with the authenticity and delivery of the speaker , that transforms words on a page into a powerful and impactful spoken narrative.

(D2C) BetterUp Blog - elevate potential_half size_v2

What makes a good speech?

A great speech includes several key qualities, but three fundamental elements make a speech truly effective:

Clarity and purpose

Remembering the audience, cohesive structure.

While other important factors make a speech a home run, these three elements are essential for writing an effective speech.

The main elements of a good speech

The main elements of a speech typically include:

  • Introduction: The introduction sets the stage for your speech and grabs the audience's attention. It should include a hook or attention-grabbing opening, introduce the topic, and provide an overview of what will be covered.
  • Opening/captivating statement: This is a strong statement that immediately engages the audience and creates curiosity about the speech topics.
  • Thesis statement/central idea: The thesis statement or central idea is a concise statement that summarizes the main point or argument of your speech. It serves as a roadmap for the audience to understand what your speech is about.
  • Body: The body of the speech is where you elaborate on your main points or arguments. Each point is typically supported by evidence, examples, statistics, or anecdotes. The body should be organized logically and coherently, with smooth transitions between the main points.
  • Supporting evidence: This includes facts, data, research findings, expert opinions, or personal stories that support and strengthen your main points. Well-chosen and credible evidence enhances the persuasive power of your speech.
  • Transitions: Transitions are phrases or statements that connect different parts of your speech, guiding the audience from one idea to the next. Effective transitions signal the shifts in topics or ideas and help maintain a smooth flow throughout the speech.
  • Counterarguments and rebuttals (if applicable): If your speech involves addressing opposing viewpoints or counterarguments, you should acknowledge and address them. Presenting counterarguments makes your speech more persuasive and demonstrates critical thinking.
  • Conclusion: The conclusion is the final part of your speech and should bring your message to a satisfying close. Summarize your main points, restate your thesis statement, and leave the audience with a memorable closing thought or call to action.
  • Closing statement: This is the final statement that leaves a lasting impression and reinforces the main message of your speech. It can be a call to action, a thought-provoking question, a powerful quote, or a memorable anecdote.
  • Delivery and presentation: How you deliver your speech is also an essential element to consider. Pay attention to your tone, body language, eye contact , voice modulation, and timing. Practice and rehearse your speech, and try using the 7-38-55 rule to ensure confident and effective delivery.

While the order and emphasis of these elements may vary depending on the type of speech and audience, these elements provide a framework for organizing and delivering a successful speech.

Man-holding-microphone-at-panel-while-talking--how-to-give-a-speech

How to structure a good speech

You know what message you want to transmit, who you’re delivering it to, and even how you want to say it. But you need to know how to start, develop, and close a speech before writing it. 

Think of a speech like an essay. It should have an introduction, conclusion, and body sections in between. This places ideas in a logical order that the audience can better understand and follow them. Learning how to make a speech with an outline gives your storytelling the scaffolding it needs to get its point across.

Here’s a general speech structure to guide your writing process:

  • Explanation 1
  • Explanation 2
  • Explanation 3

How to write a compelling speech opener

Some research shows that engaged audiences pay attention for only 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Other estimates are even lower, citing that people stop listening intently in fewer than 10 minutes . If you make a good first impression at the beginning of your speech, you have a better chance of interesting your audience through the middle when attention spans fade. 

Implementing the INTRO model can help grab and keep your audience’s attention as soon as you start speaking. This acronym stands for interest, need, timing, roadmap, and objectives, and it represents the key points you should hit in an opening. 

Here’s what to include for each of these points: 

  • Interest : Introduce yourself or your topic concisely and speak with confidence . Write a compelling opening statement using relevant data or an anecdote that the audience can relate to.
  • Needs : The audience is listening to you because they have something to learn. If you’re pitching a new app idea to a panel of investors, those potential partners want to discover more about your product and what they can earn from it. Read the room and gently remind them of the purpose of your speech. 
  • Timing : When appropriate, let your audience know how long you’ll speak. This lets listeners set expectations and keep tabs on their own attention span. If a weary audience member knows you’ll talk for 40 minutes, they can better manage their energy as that time goes on. 
  • Routemap : Give a brief overview of the three main points you’ll cover in your speech. If an audience member’s attention starts to drop off and they miss a few sentences, they can more easily get their bearings if they know the general outline of the presentation.
  • Objectives : Tell the audience what you hope to achieve, encouraging them to listen to the end for the payout. 

Writing the middle of a speech

The body of your speech is the most information-dense section. Facts, visual aids, PowerPoints — all this information meets an audience with a waning attention span. Sticking to the speech structure gives your message focus and keeps you from going off track, making everything you say as useful as possible.

Limit the middle of your speech to three points, and support them with no more than three explanations. Following this model organizes your thoughts and prevents you from offering more information than the audience can retain. 

Using this section of the speech to make your presentation interactive can add interest and engage your audience. Try including a video or demonstration to break the monotony. A quick poll or survey also keeps the audience on their toes. 

Wrapping the speech up

To you, restating your points at the end can feel repetitive and dull. You’ve practiced countless times and heard it all before. But repetition aids memory and learning , helping your audience retain what you’ve told them. Use your speech’s conclusion to summarize the main points with a few short sentences.

Try to end on a memorable note, like posing a motivational quote or a thoughtful question the audience can contemplate once they leave. In proposal or pitch-style speeches, consider landing on a call to action (CTA) that invites your audience to take the next step.

People-clapping-after-coworker-gave-a-speech-how-to-give-a-speech

How to write a good speech

If public speaking gives you the jitters, you’re not alone. Roughly 80% of the population feels nervous before giving a speech, and another 10% percent experiences intense anxiety and sometimes even panic. 

The fear of failure can cause procrastination and can cause you to put off your speechwriting process until the last minute. Finding the right words takes time and preparation, and if you’re already feeling nervous, starting from a blank page might seem even harder.

But putting in the effort despite your stress is worth it. Presenting a speech you worked hard on fosters authenticity and connects you to the subject matter, which can help your audience understand your points better. Human connection is all about honesty and vulnerability, and if you want to connect to the people you’re speaking to, they should see that in you.

1. Identify your objectives and target audience

Before diving into the writing process, find healthy coping strategies to help you stop worrying . Then you can define your speech’s purpose, think about your target audience, and start identifying your objectives. Here are some questions to ask yourself and ground your thinking : 

  • What purpose do I want my speech to achieve? 
  • What would it mean to me if I achieved the speech’s purpose?
  • What audience am I writing for? 
  • What do I know about my audience? 
  • What values do I want to transmit? 
  • If the audience remembers one take-home message, what should it be? 
  • What do I want my audience to feel, think, or do after I finish speaking? 
  • What parts of my message could be confusing and require further explanation?

2. Know your audience

Understanding your audience is crucial for tailoring your speech effectively. Consider the demographics of your audience, their interests, and their expectations. For instance, if you're addressing a group of healthcare professionals, you'll want to use medical terminology and data that resonate with them. Conversely, if your audience is a group of young students, you'd adjust your content to be more relatable to their experiences and interests. 

3. Choose a clear message

Your message should be the central idea that you want your audience to take away from your speech. Let's say you're giving a speech on climate change. Your clear message might be something like, "Individual actions can make a significant impact on mitigating climate change." Throughout your speech, all your points and examples should support this central message, reinforcing it for your audience.

4. Structure your speech

Organizing your speech properly keeps your audience engaged and helps them follow your ideas. The introduction should grab your audience's attention and introduce the topic. For example, if you're discussing space exploration, you could start with a fascinating fact about a recent space mission. In the body, you'd present your main points logically, such as the history of space exploration, its scientific significance, and future prospects. Finally, in the conclusion, you'd summarize your key points and reiterate the importance of space exploration in advancing human knowledge.

5. Use engaging content for clarity

Engaging content includes stories, anecdotes, statistics, and examples that illustrate your main points. For instance, if you're giving a speech about the importance of reading, you might share a personal story about how a particular book changed your perspective. You could also include statistics on the benefits of reading, such as improved cognitive abilities and empathy.

6. Maintain clarity and simplicity

It's essential to communicate your ideas clearly. Avoid using overly technical jargon or complex language that might confuse your audience. For example, if you're discussing a medical breakthrough with a non-medical audience, explain complex terms in simple, understandable language.

7. Practice and rehearse

Practice is key to delivering a great speech. Rehearse multiple times to refine your delivery, timing, and tone. Consider using a mirror or recording yourself to observe your body language and gestures. For instance, if you're giving a motivational speech, practice your gestures and expressions to convey enthusiasm and confidence.

8. Consider nonverbal communication

Your body language, tone of voice, and gestures should align with your message . If you're delivering a speech on leadership, maintain strong eye contact to convey authority and connection with your audience. A steady pace and varied tone can also enhance your speech's impact.

9. Engage your audience

Engaging your audience keeps them interested and attentive. Encourage interaction by asking thought-provoking questions or sharing relatable anecdotes. If you're giving a speech on teamwork, ask the audience to recall a time when teamwork led to a successful outcome, fostering engagement and connection.

10. Prepare for Q&A

Anticipate potential questions or objections your audience might have and prepare concise, well-informed responses. If you're delivering a speech on a controversial topic, such as healthcare reform, be ready to address common concerns, like the impact on healthcare costs or access to services, during the Q&A session.

By following these steps and incorporating examples that align with your specific speech topic and purpose, you can craft and deliver a compelling and impactful speech that resonates with your audience.

Woman-at-home-doing-research-in-her-laptop-how-to-give-a-speech

Tools for writing a great speech

There are several helpful tools available for speechwriting, both technological and communication-related. Here are a few examples:

  • Word processing software: Tools like Microsoft Word, Google Docs, or other word processors provide a user-friendly environment for writing and editing speeches. They offer features like spell-checking, grammar correction, formatting options, and easy revision tracking.
  • Presentation software: Software such as Microsoft PowerPoint or Google Slides is useful when creating visual aids to accompany your speech. These tools allow you to create engaging slideshows with text, images, charts, and videos to enhance your presentation.
  • Speechwriting Templates: Online platforms or software offer pre-designed templates specifically for speechwriting. These templates provide guidance on structuring your speech and may include prompts for different sections like introductions, main points, and conclusions.
  • Rhetorical devices and figures of speech: Rhetorical tools such as metaphors, similes, alliteration, and parallelism can add impact and persuasion to your speech. Resources like books, websites, or academic papers detailing various rhetorical devices can help you incorporate them effectively.
  • Speechwriting apps: Mobile apps designed specifically for speechwriting can be helpful in organizing your thoughts, creating outlines, and composing a speech. These apps often provide features like voice recording, note-taking, and virtual prompts to keep you on track.
  • Grammar and style checkers: Online tools or plugins like Grammarly or Hemingway Editor help improve the clarity and readability of your speech by checking for grammar, spelling, and style errors. They provide suggestions for sentence structure, word choice, and overall tone.
  • Thesaurus and dictionary: Online or offline resources such as thesauruses and dictionaries help expand your vocabulary and find alternative words or phrases to express your ideas more effectively. They can also clarify meanings or provide context for unfamiliar terms.
  • Online speechwriting communities: Joining online forums or communities focused on speechwriting can be beneficial for getting feedback, sharing ideas, and learning from experienced speechwriters. It's an opportunity to connect with like-minded individuals and improve your public speaking skills through collaboration.

Remember, while these tools can assist in the speechwriting process, it's essential to use them thoughtfully and adapt them to your specific needs and style. The most important aspect of speechwriting remains the creativity, authenticity, and connection with your audience that you bring to your speech.

Man-holding-microphone-while-speaking-in-public-how-to-give-a-speech

5 tips for writing a speech

Behind every great speech is an excellent idea and a speaker who refined it. But a successful speech is about more than the initial words on the page, and there are a few more things you can do to help it land.

Here are five more tips for writing and practicing your speech:

1. Structure first, write second

If you start the writing process before organizing your thoughts, you may have to re-order, cut, and scrap the sentences you worked hard on. Save yourself some time by using a speech structure, like the one above, to order your talking points first. This can also help you identify unclear points or moments that disrupt your flow.

2. Do your homework

Data strengthens your argument with a scientific edge. Research your topic with an eye for attention-grabbing statistics, or look for findings you can use to support each point. If you’re pitching a product or service, pull information from company metrics that demonstrate past or potential successes. 

Audience members will likely have questions, so learn all talking points inside and out. If you tell investors that your product will provide 12% returns, for example, come prepared with projections that support that statement.

3. Sound like yourself

Memorable speakers have distinct voices. Think of Martin Luther King Jr’s urgent, inspiring timbre or Oprah’s empathetic, personal tone . Establish your voice — one that aligns with your personality and values — and stick with it. If you’re a motivational speaker, keep your tone upbeat to inspire your audience . If you’re the CEO of a startup, try sounding assured but approachable. 

4. Practice

As you practice a speech, you become more confident , gain a better handle on the material, and learn the outline so well that unexpected questions are less likely to trip you up. Practice in front of a colleague or friend for honest feedback about what you could change, and speak in front of the mirror to tweak your nonverbal communication and body language .

5. Remember to breathe

When you’re stressed, you breathe more rapidly . It can be challenging to talk normally when you can’t regulate your breath. Before your presentation, try some mindful breathing exercises so that when the day comes, you already have strategies that will calm you down and remain present . This can also help you control your voice and avoid speaking too quickly.

How to ghostwrite a great speech for someone else

Ghostwriting a speech requires a unique set of skills, as you're essentially writing a piece that will be delivered by someone else. Here are some tips on how to effectively ghostwrite a speech:

  • Understand the speaker's voice and style : Begin by thoroughly understanding the speaker's personality, speaking style, and preferences. This includes their tone, humor, and any personal anecdotes they may want to include.
  • Interview the speaker : Have a detailed conversation with the speaker to gather information about their speech's purpose, target audience, key messages, and any specific points they want to emphasize. Ask for personal stories or examples they may want to include.
  • Research thoroughly : Research the topic to ensure you have a strong foundation of knowledge. This helps you craft a well-informed and credible speech.
  • Create an outline : Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval.
  • Write in the speaker's voice : While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style. Use language and phrasing that feel natural to them. If they have a particular way of expressing ideas, incorporate that into the speech.
  • Craft a captivating opening : Begin the speech with a compelling opening that grabs the audience's attention. This could be a relevant quote, an interesting fact, a personal anecdote, or a thought-provoking question.
  • Organize content logically : Ensure the speech flows logically, with each point building on the previous one. Use transitions to guide the audience from one idea to the next smoothly.
  • Incorporate engaging stories and examples : Include anecdotes, stories, and real-life examples that illustrate key points and make the speech relatable and memorable.
  • Edit and revise : Edit the speech carefully for clarity, grammar, and coherence. Ensure the speech is the right length and aligns with the speaker's time constraints.
  • Seek feedback : Share drafts of the speech with the speaker for their feedback and revisions. They may have specific changes or additions they'd like to make.
  • Practice delivery : If possible, work with the speaker on their delivery. Practice the speech together, allowing the speaker to become familiar with the content and your writing style.
  • Maintain confidentiality : As a ghostwriter, it's essential to respect the confidentiality and anonymity of the work. Do not disclose that you wrote the speech unless you have the speaker's permission to do so.
  • Be flexible : Be open to making changes and revisions as per the speaker's preferences. Your goal is to make them look good and effectively convey their message.
  • Meet deadlines : Stick to agreed-upon deadlines for drafts and revisions. Punctuality and reliability are essential in ghostwriting.
  • Provide support : Support the speaker during their preparation and rehearsal process. This can include helping with cue cards, speech notes, or any other materials they need.

Remember that successful ghostwriting is about capturing the essence of the speaker while delivering a well-structured and engaging speech. Collaboration, communication, and adaptability are key to achieving this.

Give your best speech yet

Learn how to make a speech that’ll hold an audience’s attention by structuring your thoughts and practicing frequently. Put the effort into writing and preparing your content, and aim to improve your breathing, eye contact , and body language as you practice. The more you work on your speech, the more confident you’ll become.

The energy you invest in writing an effective speech will help your audience remember and connect to every concept. Remember: some life-changing philosophies have come from good speeches, so give your words a chance to resonate with others. You might even change their thinking.

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Speech And Debate

Speech Writing

Last updated on: Feb 9, 2023

How to Write a Speech - Outline With Example

By: Cordon J.

Reviewed By: Rylee W.

Published on: Sep 8, 2020

How to Write a Speech

Giving a speech for a class, event or work can be nerve-wracking. However, writing an effective speech can boost your confidence level.

A speech is an effective medium to communicate your message and speech writing is a skill that has its advantages even if you are a student or a professional.

With careful planning and paying attention to small details, you can write a speech that will inform, persuade, entertain or motivate the people you are writing for.

If this is your first speech. Take all the time you need.

Like other skills, you can learn speech writing too.

Give yourself enough time to write and practice it several times for the best possible results.

How to Write a Speech

On this Page

You have a message that you want people to hear or you are preparing a speech for a particular situation such as a commemorative speech.

No matter what the case, it is important to ensure that the speech is well structured or else you will fail to deliver your effective message. And you don’t want that, do you?

You can also explore our complete guide to  write a commemorative speech . Make sure to give the article a thorough read.

How to Create a Speech Outline?

Want to write a speech your audience will remember? A speech outline is a thing you should start with.

‘How to write a speech outline?’

A speech outline is very important in helping you sound more authoritative and in control. As you write your speech outline you will have to focus on how you will introduce yourself, your topic, and the points that you will be going to cover.

A speech outline will save a lot of your time and will help you organize your thoughts. It will make sure the speech is following a proper structure and format.

Before you start writing your own speech you need to know:

  • WHO you are writing the speech for
  • WHAT the speech will be going to cover
  • HOW long it needs to be e.g if it is a 5-minute speech (then how many words in a 5-minute speech)

These speech tips will help you get on the right track from the start. Here is an example of how you can craft a speech outline.

Preparation

  • Choose your topic and the main points that your speech will cover. Know your audience and get to know what they are looking for. Pay attention to their needs
  • Define the purpose of the speech and properly organize it

Introduction

  • A strong statement to grab the reader’s attention
  • Refine the thesis statement
  • State something that establishes credibility
  • Provide your main idea and include some supporting statements.
  • Examples and further details (if needed)
  • Summarize the main points of the speech
  • Closing statement
  • Call to action

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How to Write an Effective Speech?

‘How to write a graduation speech?’

‘How to write a speech for school?’

‘How to write a speech about yourself?’

Get your answers in the below sections.

Just like essays, the speech also follows three sections: Introduction, the main body, and conclusion.

However, unlike essays, a speech must be written to be heard as opposed to just being read. It is important to write a speech in a way that can grab the reader’s attention and helps in painting a mental image.

It is the opening statement of a speech. It is important to know how to start a speech that can grab the attention of the audience.

‘How to write a speech introduction?’

It should include a hook-grabber statement about your topic. It should end with a strong transition from a big idea of the introduction to the main body of the essay. Some great ways to begin your speech are, to begin with, a rhetorical question, a quote, or another strong statement.

Make sure the introduction is not more than one paragraph. This will ensure you do not spend much time on the background before getting to the main idea of the topic.

The introduction is a great chance to make sure your opening is memorable as this is the point when your audience will make up their mind about you.

The Main body

The majority of the speech should be spent presenting your thesis statement and supporting ideas in an organized way.

Avoid rambling as it will immediately lose your audience’s attention. No need to share everything, instead pick some points and stick to them throughout your speech.

Organize your points in a logical manner so they support and build on each other. Add as many points as needed to support the overall message of your speech.

State each point clearly and provide all the required information, facts, statistics, and evidence, to clarify each of your points.

It is a good idea to include your personal experiences to make your speech more interesting and memorable.

Another important thing to be kept in mind is the use of transition. The purpose of adding transition words is to improve the overall flow of the information and help the reader to understand the speech structure. Words like next, then, after, before, at that moment, etc. are the most commonly used transition words to make the whole writing less choppy and more interesting.

The conclusion should restate and summarize all the main points of the speech. Because the audience will most likely remember what they have heard last. Beautifully wrap up the whole speech and give something for the audience to think about.

For an extra element, close your speech by restating the introduction statement so it feels like a complete package.

A good approach to conclude your speech is to introduce a call to action. Encourage your audience to participate in the solution to the problem that you are discussing. Give your audience some direction on how they can participate.

Practice and more practice is key to a great speech so it is important that you read your speech and listen to yourself. When writing, take care of the required length also.

Speech Topics - Engaging Topics to Choose From

You feel relief when your teacher says you are free to choose your speech topic. Feel free to write about anything you want. The problem is students still feel stuck in choosing an effective speech topic. If you are one of them, here is a list of the best speech ideas to help you get through the process.

  • What role do cats play in human’s lives
  • How to improve communication disorders
  • World’s fastest-growing country
  • Today’s world pollution rate
  • How to improve interpersonal skills
  • Are paper books better than e-books
  • Should the death penalty be abolished
  • Should prisoners be allowed to vote
  • Should voting be made compulsory
  • Is it better to live together before marriage

These are some of the interesting topics that you can consider. However, if you are still not sure about the topic of your speech, you can explore our article on  informative speech topics  and pick any of your choices.

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Speech Example

Stressing over on how to write a good speech? Speech examples are sure to be your best friend for effective speech writing and its effortless delivery.

Here is a sample speech example to help you get through your own speech writing process. Explore this example and get the answer on how to give a good speech.

Get Professional Help for Your Speech

If you are good at public speaking but lack writing skills or you do not have enough time to follow the mentioned points and write a speech, don't worry.

You can always contact us at 5StarEssays.com.

We have a highly qualified and amazing team of expert writers who can help you if you want to buy speeches online with high-quality content.

Contact our " write my essay " service with your requirements. Our essay writer will provide you with quality material that your audience will remember for a long time.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best introduction for a speech.

The best way to open a speech’s introduction is, to begin with, a story. Tell an inspiring story to your audience and connect it with your personal narrative.

What is the first step of speech writing?

The first step of writing a speech is to choose a topic. Choosing a good topic is important to have an engaging and great speech.

What are the five steps in speech writing?

Here are the five steps involved in writing a speech.

  • Choose a topic.
  • Investigate your audience.
  • Built an outline.
  • Rehearse the speech.
  • Revise and finalize.

What are the types of speech delivery?

Here are the types of speech delivery.

  • Extemporaneous

What are the two P’s required for good speech delivery?

The two P’s required for proper speech delivery are Preparation and Practice.

Cordon J.

Cordon. is a published author and writing specialist. He has worked in the publishing industry for many years, providing writing services and digital content. His own writing career began with a focus on literature and linguistics, which he continues to pursue. Cordon is an engaging and professional individual, always looking to help others achieve their goals.

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How to Write a Narrative Essay or Speech

  • Ph.D., Rhetoric and English, University of Georgia
  • M.A., Modern English and American Literature, University of Leicester
  • B.A., English, State University of New York

A narrative essay or speech is used to tell a story, often one that is based on personal experience. This genre of work comprises works of nonfiction that hew closely to the facts and follow a logical chronological progression of events. Writers often use anecdotes to relate their experiences and engage the reader. In doing so, you can give your narrative a level of emotional appeal. It can be serious or humorous, but this emotional appeal is essential if you want to  give your audience some way to connect with your story.

The most successful narrative essays usually share these three basic traits:

  • They make a central point.
  • They contain  specific details in support  of that point.
  • They are clearly  organized in time .

Constructing the Essay

Magazines like the New Yorker and websites like Vice are known for the pages-long narrative essays they publish, sometimes called long-format journalism. But an effective narrative essay can be as short as five paragraphs. As with other kinds of essay writing, narratives follow the same basic outline:

  • Introduction: This is the opening paragraph of your essay. It contains the hook, which is used to grab the reader's attention, and the thesis or topic, which you'll detail in the next section.
  • Body: This is the heart of your essay, usually three to five paragraphs in length. Each paragraph should contain one example, such as a personal anecdote or noteworthy event, that supports your larger topic.
  • Conclusion: This is the final paragraph of your essay. In it, you'll sum up the main points of the body and bring your narrative to an end. Writers sometimes embellish the conclusion with an epilogue or a takeaway.

Narrative Essay Topics

Choosing the topic for your essay may be the hardest part. What you're looking for is a particular incident that you can recount in a well-developed and clearly organized essay  or speech . We have a few ideas to help you brainstorm topics. They're quite broad, but something will surely spark an idea.

  • An embarrassing experience
  • A memorable wedding or funeral
  • An exciting minute or two of a football game (or another sporting event)
  • Your first or last day at a job or new school
  • A disastrous date
  • A memorable moment of failure or success
  • An encounter that changed your life or taught you a lesson
  • An experience that led to a renewed faith
  • A strange or unexpected encounter
  • An experience of how technology is more trouble than it's worth
  • An experience that left you disillusioned
  • A frightening or dangerous experience
  • A memorable journey
  • An encounter with someone you were in awe of or afraid of
  • An occasion when you experienced rejection
  • Your first visit to the countryside (or to a large city)
  • The circumstances that led to the breakup of a friendship
  • An experience that showed that you should be careful of what you wish for
  • A significant or comic misunderstanding
  • An experience that showed how appearances can be deceiving
  • An account of a difficult decision that you had to make
  • An event that marked a turning point in your life
  • An experience that changed your viewpoint on a controversial issue
  • A memorable encounter with someone in authority
  • An act of heroism or cowardice
  • An imaginary encounter with a real person
  • A rebellious act
  • A brush with greatness or death
  • A time that you took a stand on an important issue
  • An experience that altered your view of someone
  • A trip that you would like to take
  • A vacation trip from your childhood
  • An account of a visit to a fictional place or time
  • Your first time away from home
  • Two different versions of the same event
  • A day when everything went right or wrong
  • An experience that made you laugh until you cried
  • The experience of being lost
  • Surviving a natural disaster
  • An important discovery
  • An eyewitness account of an important event
  • An experience that helped you grow up
  • A description of your secret place
  • An account of what it would be like to live as a particular animal
  • Your dream job and what it would be like
  • An invention you'd like to create
  • A time when you realized your parents were right
  • An account of your earliest memory
  • Your reaction when you heard the best news of your life
  • A description of the one thing you can't live without

Other Types of Essays

Narrative essays are one of the major essay types. Others include:

  • Argumentative: In argumentative essays , the writer makes the case for a specific opinion on a topic, using research and analysis to persuade the reader.
  • Descriptive: This kind of writing relies on detail to describe or define a person, place, thing, or experience. Writing may be either objective or subjective.
  • Expository: Like argumentative essays, expository writing requires research and analysis in order to expound upon a subject. Unlike argumentative essays, the intention is not to change the readers' opinion but to inform the readers.
  • Angelli, Elizabeth; Baker, Jack; and Brizee, Allen. " Essay Writing ." Perdue.edu. 9 February 2018.
  • Beck, Kate. " Instructions to Write a Narrative Essay. " SeattlePI.com.
  • Santa Barbara City College staff. "Structure of a Personal Narrative Essay." SBCC.edu.
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  • How to Write a Great Process Essay
  • 6 Steps to Writing the Perfect Personal Essay
  • The Ultimate Guide to the 5-Paragraph Essay
  • Personal Essay Topics
  • How to Write a Great Essay for the TOEFL or TOEIC
  • How to Write a Solid Thesis Statement
  • Write an Attention-Grabbing Opening Sentence for an Essay
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  • What Is an Autobiography?
  • How to Write an Outstanding College Application Essay
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  • How To Write an Essay
  • How to Write and Format an MBA Essay

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  • The four main types of essay | Quick guide with examples

The Four Main Types of Essay | Quick Guide with Examples

Published on September 4, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

An essay is a focused piece of writing designed to inform or persuade. There are many different types of essay, but they are often defined in four categories: argumentative, expository, narrative, and descriptive essays.

Argumentative and expository essays are focused on conveying information and making clear points, while narrative and descriptive essays are about exercising creativity and writing in an interesting way. At university level, argumentative essays are the most common type. 

In high school and college, you will also often have to write textual analysis essays, which test your skills in close reading and interpretation.

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Table of contents

Argumentative essays, expository essays, narrative essays, descriptive essays, textual analysis essays, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about types of essays.

An argumentative essay presents an extended, evidence-based argument. It requires a strong thesis statement —a clearly defined stance on your topic. Your aim is to convince the reader of your thesis using evidence (such as quotations ) and analysis.

Argumentative essays test your ability to research and present your own position on a topic. This is the most common type of essay at college level—most papers you write will involve some kind of argumentation.

The essay is divided into an introduction, body, and conclusion:

  • The introduction provides your topic and thesis statement
  • The body presents your evidence and arguments
  • The conclusion summarizes your argument and emphasizes its importance

The example below is a paragraph from the body of an argumentative essay about the effects of the internet on education. Mouse over it to learn more.

A common frustration for teachers is students’ use of Wikipedia as a source in their writing. Its prevalence among students is not exaggerated; a survey found that the vast majority of the students surveyed used Wikipedia (Head & Eisenberg, 2010). An article in The Guardian stresses a common objection to its use: “a reliance on Wikipedia can discourage students from engaging with genuine academic writing” (Coomer, 2013). Teachers are clearly not mistaken in viewing Wikipedia usage as ubiquitous among their students; but the claim that it discourages engagement with academic sources requires further investigation. This point is treated as self-evident by many teachers, but Wikipedia itself explicitly encourages students to look into other sources. Its articles often provide references to academic publications and include warning notes where citations are missing; the site’s own guidelines for research make clear that it should be used as a starting point, emphasizing that users should always “read the references and check whether they really do support what the article says” (“Wikipedia:Researching with Wikipedia,” 2020). Indeed, for many students, Wikipedia is their first encounter with the concepts of citation and referencing. The use of Wikipedia therefore has a positive side that merits deeper consideration than it often receives.

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An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a topic. It doesn’t require an original argument, just a balanced and well-organized view of the topic.

Expository essays test your familiarity with a topic and your ability to organize and convey information. They are commonly assigned at high school or in exam questions at college level.

The introduction of an expository essay states your topic and provides some general background, the body presents the details, and the conclusion summarizes the information presented.

A typical body paragraph from an expository essay about the invention of the printing press is shown below. Mouse over it to learn more.

The invention of the printing press in 1440 changed this situation dramatically. Johannes Gutenberg, who had worked as a goldsmith, used his knowledge of metals in the design of the press. He made his type from an alloy of lead, tin, and antimony, whose durability allowed for the reliable production of high-quality books. This new technology allowed texts to be reproduced and disseminated on a much larger scale than was previously possible. The Gutenberg Bible appeared in the 1450s, and a large number of printing presses sprang up across the continent in the following decades. Gutenberg’s invention rapidly transformed cultural production in Europe; among other things, it would lead to the Protestant Reformation.

A narrative essay is one that tells a story. This is usually a story about a personal experience you had, but it may also be an imaginative exploration of something you have not experienced.

Narrative essays test your ability to build up a narrative in an engaging, well-structured way. They are much more personal and creative than other kinds of academic writing . Writing a personal statement for an application requires the same skills as a narrative essay.

A narrative essay isn’t strictly divided into introduction, body, and conclusion, but it should still begin by setting up the narrative and finish by expressing the point of the story—what you learned from your experience, or why it made an impression on you.

Mouse over the example below, a short narrative essay responding to the prompt “Write about an experience where you learned something about yourself,” to explore its structure.

Since elementary school, I have always favored subjects like science and math over the humanities. My instinct was always to think of these subjects as more solid and serious than classes like English. If there was no right answer, I thought, why bother? But recently I had an experience that taught me my academic interests are more flexible than I had thought: I took my first philosophy class.

Before I entered the classroom, I was skeptical. I waited outside with the other students and wondered what exactly philosophy would involve—I really had no idea. I imagined something pretty abstract: long, stilted conversations pondering the meaning of life. But what I got was something quite different.

A young man in jeans, Mr. Jones—“but you can call me Rob”—was far from the white-haired, buttoned-up old man I had half-expected. And rather than pulling us into pedantic arguments about obscure philosophical points, Rob engaged us on our level. To talk free will, we looked at our own choices. To talk ethics, we looked at dilemmas we had faced ourselves. By the end of class, I’d discovered that questions with no right answer can turn out to be the most interesting ones.

The experience has taught me to look at things a little more “philosophically”—and not just because it was a philosophy class! I learned that if I let go of my preconceptions, I can actually get a lot out of subjects I was previously dismissive of. The class taught me—in more ways than one—to look at things with an open mind.

A descriptive essay provides a detailed sensory description of something. Like narrative essays, they allow you to be more creative than most academic writing, but they are more tightly focused than narrative essays. You might describe a specific place or object, rather than telling a whole story.

Descriptive essays test your ability to use language creatively, making striking word choices to convey a memorable picture of what you’re describing.

A descriptive essay can be quite loosely structured, though it should usually begin by introducing the object of your description and end by drawing an overall picture of it. The important thing is to use careful word choices and figurative language to create an original description of your object.

Mouse over the example below, a response to the prompt “Describe a place you love to spend time in,” to learn more about descriptive essays.

On Sunday afternoons I like to spend my time in the garden behind my house. The garden is narrow but long, a corridor of green extending from the back of the house, and I sit on a lawn chair at the far end to read and relax. I am in my small peaceful paradise: the shade of the tree, the feel of the grass on my feet, the gentle activity of the fish in the pond beside me.

My cat crosses the garden nimbly and leaps onto the fence to survey it from above. From his perch he can watch over his little kingdom and keep an eye on the neighbours. He does this until the barking of next door’s dog scares him from his post and he bolts for the cat flap to govern from the safety of the kitchen.

With that, I am left alone with the fish, whose whole world is the pond by my feet. The fish explore the pond every day as if for the first time, prodding and inspecting every stone. I sometimes feel the same about sitting here in the garden; I know the place better than anyone, but whenever I return I still feel compelled to pay attention to all its details and novelties—a new bird perched in the tree, the growth of the grass, and the movement of the insects it shelters…

Sitting out in the garden, I feel serene. I feel at home. And yet I always feel there is more to discover. The bounds of my garden may be small, but there is a whole world contained within it, and it is one I will never get tired of inhabiting.

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Though every essay type tests your writing skills, some essays also test your ability to read carefully and critically. In a textual analysis essay, you don’t just present information on a topic, but closely analyze a text to explain how it achieves certain effects.

Rhetorical analysis

A rhetorical analysis looks at a persuasive text (e.g. a speech, an essay, a political cartoon) in terms of the rhetorical devices it uses, and evaluates their effectiveness.

The goal is not to state whether you agree with the author’s argument but to look at how they have constructed it.

The introduction of a rhetorical analysis presents the text, some background information, and your thesis statement; the body comprises the analysis itself; and the conclusion wraps up your analysis of the text, emphasizing its relevance to broader concerns.

The example below is from a rhetorical analysis of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech . Mouse over it to learn more.

King’s speech is infused with prophetic language throughout. Even before the famous “dream” part of the speech, King’s language consistently strikes a prophetic tone. He refers to the Lincoln Memorial as a “hallowed spot” and speaks of rising “from the dark and desolate valley of segregation” to “make justice a reality for all of God’s children.” The assumption of this prophetic voice constitutes the text’s strongest ethical appeal; after linking himself with political figures like Lincoln and the Founding Fathers, King’s ethos adopts a distinctly religious tone, recalling Biblical prophets and preachers of change from across history. This adds significant force to his words; standing before an audience of hundreds of thousands, he states not just what the future should be, but what it will be: “The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.” This warning is almost apocalyptic in tone, though it concludes with the positive image of the “bright day of justice.” The power of King’s rhetoric thus stems not only from the pathos of his vision of a brighter future, but from the ethos of the prophetic voice he adopts in expressing this vision.

Literary analysis

A literary analysis essay presents a close reading of a work of literature—e.g. a poem or novel—to explore the choices made by the author and how they help to convey the text’s theme. It is not simply a book report or a review, but an in-depth interpretation of the text.

Literary analysis looks at things like setting, characters, themes, and figurative language. The goal is to closely analyze what the author conveys and how.

The introduction of a literary analysis essay presents the text and background, and provides your thesis statement; the body consists of close readings of the text with quotations and analysis in support of your argument; and the conclusion emphasizes what your approach tells us about the text.

Mouse over the example below, the introduction to a literary analysis essay on Frankenstein , to learn more.

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is often read as a crude cautionary tale about the dangers of scientific advancement unrestrained by ethical considerations. In this reading, protagonist Victor Frankenstein is a stable representation of the callous ambition of modern science throughout the novel. This essay, however, argues that far from providing a stable image of the character, Shelley uses shifting narrative perspectives to portray Frankenstein in an increasingly negative light as the novel goes on. While he initially appears to be a naive but sympathetic idealist, after the creature’s narrative Frankenstein begins to resemble—even in his own telling—the thoughtlessly cruel figure the creature represents him as. This essay begins by exploring the positive portrayal of Frankenstein in the first volume, then moves on to the creature’s perception of him, and finally discusses the third volume’s narrative shift toward viewing Frankenstein as the creature views him.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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At high school and in composition classes at university, you’ll often be told to write a specific type of essay , but you might also just be given prompts.

Look for keywords in these prompts that suggest a certain approach: The word “explain” suggests you should write an expository essay , while the word “describe” implies a descriptive essay . An argumentative essay might be prompted with the word “assess” or “argue.”

The vast majority of essays written at university are some sort of argumentative essay . Almost all academic writing involves building up an argument, though other types of essay might be assigned in composition classes.

Essays can present arguments about all kinds of different topics. For example:

  • In a literary analysis essay, you might make an argument for a specific interpretation of a text
  • In a history essay, you might present an argument for the importance of a particular event
  • In a politics essay, you might argue for the validity of a certain political theory

An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

The key difference is that a narrative essay is designed to tell a complete story, while a descriptive essay is meant to convey an intense description of a particular place, object, or concept.

Narrative and descriptive essays both allow you to write more personally and creatively than other kinds of essays , and similar writing skills can apply to both.

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How to Write a Professional Speech

How to Write a Professional Speech

  • 5-minute read
  • 7th May 2022

At some point in your professional career, you may find yourself with the daunting task of writing a speech. However, armed with the right information on how to write an engaging, attention-grabbing speech, you can rest assured that you’ll deliver a truly memorable one. Check out our guide below on how to write a professional speech that will successfully communicate your message and leave your audience feeling like they’ve truly learned something.

1.Understand your audience

Knowing your target audience can help guide you along the writing process. Learn as much as possible about them and the event you’re planning to speak at. Keep these key points in mind when you’re writing your speech.

●  Who are they?

●  Why are they here?

●  What do they hope to learn?

●  How much do they already know about my topic?

●  What am I hoping to teach them?

●  What interests them about my topic?

2. Research your topic

Perform in-depth research and analysis of your topic.

●  Consider all angles and aspects.

●  Think about the various ways you can discuss and debate the subject.

●  Keep in mind why you’re passionate about the topic and what you’re hoping to achieve by discussing it.

●  Determine how you can use the information gathered to connect the dots for your audience.

●  Look for examples or statistics that will resonate with your audience.

●  Sift through the research to pick out the most important points for your audience.

 3. Create an opening hook

The first few minutes of your speech are paramount to its success. This is the moment when your audience truly pays attention and listens attentively.

●  Start with a bold, persuasive opening statement that captures your audience’s attention.

●  Ask a question to get them involved.

●  Offer a shocking statistic or a powerful, well-known quote.

●  Make a statement or rhetoric question and then pause for a moment, allowing them to grasp the gravity of what you’ve just said.

●  Use a personal anecdote or life experience related to your topic to engage them.

4. Use an easy-to-grasp format

When you have the information you need, outline your speech in a way that your audience can easily follow.

●  Start with what you plan to discuss in the speech.

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●  Go deeper into the details of the subject matter.

●  Repeat what you’ve already mentioned in a few brief points.

●  End with a strong statement that sums up what you were trying to achieve.

A typical structure should include:

●  Introduction: Outline the main talking points of your speech.

●  Body: Discuss these points in more detail, offer statistics, case studies, presentation aids, and other evidence to prove your theories.

●  Conclusion: Wrap up your discussion with a bold message that leaves your audience feeling empowered, hopeful, and more knowledgeable about the topic.

5. Add some personality and humor

Remember to let your personality shine through. This speech is more than just words on a page. Allow the audience to feel your passion and vigor. Force them to think about the message you’re conveying.

●  Share personal stories, fears, memories, or failures to help the audience relate to you as a person.

●  Include some humor, jokes, puns, or limericks to give them a brief respite from the complex discussion.

●  Offer well-known, popular, resounding quotes to help them acknowledge the significance of the topic.

5. Use anaphora for emphasis

Repetition is key in speeches. Realistically, you may lose your audience’s attention at times. By repeating key messages, they’ll be able to remember these vital takeaways despite drifting off somewhere in between. Anaphora allows you to repeat certain words or phrases in a clever, unique way that emphasizes your core message.

6. Keep it short and sweet

●  Say what you need to in the shortest amount of time possible.

●  You can’t realistically expect your audience to actively listen if you drone on and on.

●  Provide clear, concise explanations and supporting examples or evidence.

7. Adopt presentation aids

People will quickly understand your message if you show them charts, tables, graphs, photos, or even regular household items .

8. Read it aloud

●  This ensures you achieve a compelling tone of voice.

●  It can also help you determine if the length is appropriate.

●  Reading it aloud can also help you decide if you need to add more jokes, personal anecdotes, or even dramatic pauses and rhetoric questions.

9. End on a powerful note

End with a message that makes your reader feel inspired, motivated, and informed.

10. Proofread your speech

Finally, a well-researched speech riddled with errors, inconsistencies, and an ineffective tone of voice won’t help you achieve your ultimate goal – namely, to enlighten and educate your audience and have them walk away with the topic still playing on their mind. Have a friend or colleague read through your speech to highlight areas that require correction before you’re ready to present.

If you want to learn more about how we can help you write a powerful, resounding, and well-written speech, send us a free sample today.

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And that’s the beauty of it all. You don’t have to wait. You simply press play and artificial intelligence makes the words come alive instantly, in a very natural sounding voice. You can change voices and accents across multiple languages.

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Thanks for sharing this.I love this feature. I just tweeted at you on how much I like it. The voice is great and not at all like the text-to-speech I am used to listening to. I am a podcaster and I think this will help a lot of people multitask a bit, especially if they are interrupted with incoming emails or whatever. You can read-along but continue reading if your eyes need to go elsewhere. Hope you keep this. It’s already in other web publications. I also see it in some news sites. So I think it could become a standard that readers expect when they read online. Can I vote twice?

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I just started using Medium more and I absolutely love this feature. I’ve listened to my own stories and the Al does the inflections just as I would. Many complain that they can’t read their own stories, but let’s be honest. How many stories would go without an audio version if you had to do all of them yourself? I certainly appreciate it. Thanks for this!!

Oh! How cool – I love it 🙂 The voice is surprisingly natural sounding! My eyes took a much appreciated rest for a bit. I’ve been a long time subscriber to Audible on Amazon. I think this is Great 🙂 Thank you!

Paola Rios Schaaf

Super excited about this! We are all spending too much time staring at our screens. Using another sense to take in the great content at Medium is awesome.

Hi Warren, I am one of those small, randomly selected people, and I ABSOLUTELY love this feature. I have consumed more ideas than I ever have on Medium. And also as a non-native English speaker, this is really helping me to improve my pronunciation. Keep this forevermore! Love, Ananya:)

This is the single most important feature you can role out for me. I simply don’t have the time to read all the articles I would like to on Medium. If I could listen to the articles I could consume at least 3X the amount of Medium content I do now.

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Love this feature Warren. I use it when I’m reading, helps me churn through reading and also stay focused on the article (at a good speed) when my willpower is low! Keeping me more engaged..

I was THRILLED the other day when I saw the audio option. I didn’t know how it got there, but I pressed play, and then I was blown away hearing the words that I wrote being narrated

Neeramitra Reddy

LOVE THISSS. As someone who loves audio almost as much as reading, this is absolute gold

What is text to speech (TTS)?

Text-to-speech goes by a few names. Some refer to it as TTS,  read aloud , or even speech synthesis ; for the more engineered name. Today, it simply means using  artificial intelligence  to read words aloud be; it from a PDF, email, docs, or any website. Instantly turn text into audio. Listen in English, Italian, Portuguese,  Spanish , or more and choose your accent and character to personalize your experience.

How does AI text to speech work?

Beautifully. Speech synthesis works by installing an app like Speechify either on your device or as a browser extension. AI scans the words on the page and  reads it out loud , without any lag. You can change the default voice to a custom voice, change accents, languages, and even increase or decrease the speaking rate.

AI has made significant progress in synthesizing voices. It can pick up on formatted text and change tone accordingly. Gone are the days where the voices sounded  robotic . Speechify is revolutionizing that.

Once you install the TTS mobile app, you can easily convert text to speech from any website within your browser, read aloud your email, and more. If you install it as a  browser extension , you can do just the same on your laptop. The web version is OS agnostic. Mac or Windows, no problem.

What is the text-to-speech service?

A text-to-speech service is a tool, like Speechify text to speech, that transforms your written words into spoken words. Imagine typing out a message and having it read out loud by a digital voice – that’s what TTS services, like Speechify TTS do.

What are the benefits of text to speech?

TTS technology offers many benefits, like helping those with reading difficulties, providing rest for your eyes, multitasking by listening to content, improving pronunciation and language learning, and making content accessible to a wider audience.

How is Speechify TTS better than Murf AI text to speech, Google Voice, or TTSReader?

Speechify TTS stands out by offering a more natural and human-like voice quality, a wider range of customization options, and user-friendly integration across devices. Plus, our dedication to accessibility means that we ensure a seamless and inclusive experience for all users.

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Frantically Speaking

15 Powerful Speech Opening Lines (And How to Create Your Own)

Hrideep barot.

  • Public Speaking , Speech Writing

powerful speech opening

Powerful speech opening lines set the tone and mood of your speech. It’s what grips the audience to want to know more about the rest of your talk.

The first few seconds are critical. It’s when you have maximum attention of the audience. And you must capitalize on that!

Instead of starting off with something plain and obvious such as a ‘Thank you’ or ‘Good Morning’, there’s so much more you can do for a powerful speech opening (here’s a great article we wrote a while ago on how you should NOT start your speech ).

To help you with this, I’ve compiled some of my favourite openings from various speakers. These speakers have gone on to deliver TED talks , win international Toastmaster competitions or are just noteworthy people who have mastered the art of communication.

After each speaker’s opening line, I have added how you can include their style of opening into your own speech. Understanding how these great speakers do it will certainly give you an idea to create your own speech opening line which will grip the audience from the outset!

Alright! Let’s dive into the 15 powerful speech openings…

Note: Want to take your communications skills to the next level? Book a complimentary consultation with one of our expert communication coaches. We’ll look under the hood of your hurdles and pick two to three growth opportunities so you can speak with impact!

1. Ric Elias

Opening: “Imagine a big explosion as you climb through 3,000 ft. Imagine a plane full of smoke. Imagine an engine going clack, clack, clack. It sounds scary. Well I had a unique seat that day. I was sitting in 1D.”

How to use the power of imagination to open your speech?

Putting your audience in a state of imagination can work extremely well to captivate them for the remainder of your talk.

It really helps to bring your audience in a certain mood that preps them for what’s about to come next. Speakers have used this with high effectiveness by transporting their audience into an imaginary land to help prove their point.

When Ric Elias opened his speech, the detail he used (3000 ft, sound of the engine going clack-clack-clack) made me feel that I too was in the plane. He was trying to make the audience experience what he was feeling – and, at least in my opinion, he did.

When using the imagination opening for speeches, the key is – detail. While we want the audience to wander into imagination, we want them to wander off to the image that we want to create for them. So, detail out your scenario if you’re going to use this technique.

Make your audience feel like they too are in the same circumstance as you were when you were in that particular situation.

2. Barack Obama

Opening: “You can’t say it, but you know it’s true.”

3. Seth MacFarlane

Opening: “There’s nowhere I would rather be on a day like this than around all this electoral equipment.” (It was raining)

How to use humour to open your speech?

When you use humour in a manner that suits your personality, it can set you up for a great speech. Why? Because getting a laugh in the first 30 seconds or so is a great way to quickly get the audience to like you.

And when they like you, they are much more likely to listen to and believe in your ideas.

Obama effortlessly uses his opening line to entice laughter among the audience. He brilliantly used the setting (the context of Trump becoming President) and said a line that completely matched his style of speaking.

Saying a joke without really saying a joke and getting people to laugh requires you to be completely comfortable in your own skin. And that’s not easy for many people (me being one of them).

If the joke doesn’t land as expected, it could lead to a rocky start.

Keep in mind the following when attempting to deliver a funny introduction:

  • Know your audience: Make sure your audience gets the context of the joke (if it’s an inside joke among the members you’re speaking to, that’s even better!). You can read this article we wrote where we give you tips on how you can actually get to know your audience better to ensure maximum impact with your speech openings
  • The joke should suit your natural personality. Don’t make it look forced or it won’t elicit the desired response
  • Test the opening out on a few people who match your real audience. Analyze their response and tweak the joke accordingly if necessary
  • Starting your speech with humour means your setting the tone of your speech. It would make sense to have a few more jokes sprinkled around the rest of the speech as well as the audience might be expecting the same from you

4. Mohammed Qahtani

Opening: Puts a cigarette on his lips, lights a lighter, stops just before lighting the cigarette. Looks at audience, “What?”

5. Darren Tay

Opening: Puts a white pair of briefs over his pants.

How to use props to begin your speech?

The reason props work so well in a talk is because in most cases the audience is not expecting anything more than just talking. So when a speaker pulls out an object that is unusual, everyone’s attention goes right to it.

It makes you wonder why that prop is being used in this particular speech.

The key word here is unusual . To grip the audience’s attention at the beginning of the speech, the prop being used should be something that the audience would never expect. Otherwise, it just becomes something that is common. And common = boring!

What Mohammed Qahtani and Darren Tay did superbly well in their talks was that they used props that nobody expected them to.

By pulling out a cigarette and lighter or a white pair of underwear, the audience can’t help but be gripped by what the speaker is about to do next. And that makes for a powerful speech opening.

6. Simon Sinek

Opening: “How do you explain when things don’t go as we assume? Or better, how do you explain when others are able to achieve things that seem to defy all of the assumptions?”

7. Julian Treasure

Opening: “The human voice. It’s the instrument we all play. It’s the most powerful sound in the world. Probably the only one that can start a war or say “I love you.” And yet many people have the experience that when they speak people don’t listen to them. Why is that? How can we speak powerfully to make change in the world?”

How to use questions to open a speech?

I use this method often. Starting off with a question is the simplest way to start your speech in a manner that immediately engages the audience.

But we should keep our questions compelling as opposed to something that is fairly obvious.

I’ve heard many speakers start their speeches with questions like “How many of us want to be successful?”

No one is going to say ‘no’ to that and frankly, I just feel silly raising my hand at such questions.

Simon Sinek and Jullian Treasure used questions in a manner that really made the audience think and make them curious to find out what the answer to that question is.

What Jullian Treasure did even better was the use of a few statements which built up to his question. This made the question even more compelling and set the theme for what the rest of his talk would be about.

So think of what question you can ask in your speech that will:

  • Set the theme for the remainder of your speech
  • Not be something that is fairly obvious
  • Be compelling enough so that the audience will actually want to know what the answer to that question will be

8. Aaron Beverley

Opening: Long pause (after an absurdly long introduction of a 57-word speech title). “Be honest. You enjoyed that, didn’t you?”

How to use silence for speech openings?

The reason this speech opening stands out is because of the fact that the title itself is 57 words long. The audience was already hilariously intrigued by what was going to come next.

But what’s so gripping here is the way Aaron holds the crowd’s suspense by…doing nothing. For about 10 to 12 seconds he did nothing but stand and look at the audience. Everyone quietened down. He then broke this silence by a humorous remark that brought the audience laughing down again.

When going on to open your speech, besides focusing on building a killer opening sentence, how about just being silent?

It’s important to keep in mind that the point of having a strong opening is so that the audience’s attention is all on you and are intrigued enough to want to listen to the rest of your speech.

Silence is a great way to do that. When you get on the stage, just pause for a few seconds (about 3 to 5 seconds) and just look at the crowd. Let the audience and yourself settle in to the fact that the spotlight is now on you.

I can’t put my finger on it, but there is something about starting the speech off with a pure pause that just makes the beginning so much more powerful. It adds credibility to you as a speaker as well, making you look more comfortable and confident on stage. 

If you want to know more about the power of pausing in public speaking , check out this post we wrote. It will give you a deeper insight into the importance of pausing and how you can harness it for your own speeches. You can also check out this video to know more about Pausing for Public Speaking:

9. Dan Pink

Opening: “I need to make a confession at the outset here. Little over 20 years ago, I did something that I regret. Something that I’m not particularly proud of. Something that in many ways I wish no one would ever know but that here I feel kind of obliged to reveal.”

10. Kelly McGonigal

Opening: “I have a confession to make. But first I want you to make a little confession to me.”

How to use a build-up to open your speech?

When there are so many amazing ways to start a speech and grip an audience from the outset, why would you ever choose to begin your speech with a ‘Good morning?’.

That’s what I love about build-ups. They set the mood for something awesome that’s about to come in that the audience will feel like they just have to know about.

Instead of starting a speech as it is, see if you can add some build-up to your beginning itself. For instance, in Kelly McGonigal’s speech, she could have started off with the question of stress itself (which she eventually moves on to in her speech). It’s not a bad way to start the speech.

But by adding the statement of “I have a confession to make” and then not revealing the confession for a little bit, the audience is gripped to know what she’s about to do next and find out what indeed is her confession.

11. Tim Urban

Opening: “So in college, I was a government major. Which means that I had to write a lot of papers. Now when a normal student writes a paper, they might spread the work out a little like this.”

12. Scott Dinsmore

Opening: “8 years ago, I got the worst career advice of my life.”

How to use storytelling as a speech opening?

“The most powerful person in the world is the storyteller.” Steve Jobs

Storytelling is the foundation of good speeches. Starting your speech with a story is a great way to grip the audience’s attention. It makes them yearn to want to know how the rest of the story is going to pan out.

Tim Urban starts off his speech with a story dating back to his college days. His use of slides is masterful and something we all can learn from. But while his story sounds simple, it does the job of intriguing the audience to want to know more.

As soon as I heard the opening lines, I thought to myself “If normal students write their paper in a certain manner, how does Tim write his papers?”

Combine such a simple yet intriguing opening with comedic slides, and you’ve got yourself a pretty gripping speech.

Scott Dismore’s statement has a similar impact. However, just a side note, Scott Dismore actually started his speech with “Wow, what an honour.”

I would advise to not start your talk with something such as that. It’s way too common and does not do the job an opening must, which is to grip your audience and set the tone for what’s coming.

13. Larry Smith

Opening: “I want to discuss with you this afternoon why you’re going to fail to have a great career.”

14. Jane McGonigal

Opening: “You will live 7.5 minutes longer than you would have otherwise, just because you watched this talk.”

How to use provocative statements to start your speech?

Making a provocative statement creates a keen desire among the audience to want to know more about what you have to say. It immediately brings everyone into attention.

Larry Smith did just that by making his opening statement surprising, lightly humorous, and above all – fearful. These elements lead to an opening statement which creates so much curiosity among the audience that they need to know how your speech pans out.

This one time, I remember seeing a speaker start a speech with, “Last week, my best friend committed suicide.” The entire crowd was gripped. Everyone could feel the tension in the room.

They were just waiting for the speaker to continue to know where this speech will go.

That’s what a hard-hitting statement does, it intrigues your audience so much that they can’t wait to hear more! Just a tip, if you do start off with a provocative, hard-hitting statement, make sure you pause for a moment after saying it.

Silence after an impactful statement will allow your message to really sink in with the audience.

Related article: 5 Ways to Grab Your Audience’s Attention When You’re Losing it!

15. Ramona J Smith

Opening: In a boxing stance, “Life would sometimes feel like a fight. The punches, jabs and hooks will come in the form of challenges, obstacles and failures. Yet if you stay in the ring and learn from those past fights, at the end of each round, you’ll be still standing.”

How to use your full body to grip the audience at the beginning of your speech?

In a talk, the audience is expecting you to do just that – talk. But when you enter the stage and start putting your full body into use in a way that the audience does not expect, it grabs their attention.

Body language is critical when it comes to public speaking. Hand gestures, stage movement, facial expressions are all things that need to be paid attention to while you’re speaking on stage. But that’s not I’m talking about here.

Here, I’m referring to a unique use of the body that grips the audience, like how Ramona did. By using her body to get into a boxing stance, imitating punches, jabs and hooks with her arms while talking – that’s what got the audience’s attention.

The reason I say this is so powerful is because if you take Ramona’s speech and remove the body usage from her opening, the entire magic of the opening falls flat.

While the content is definitely strong, without those movements, she would not have captured the audience’s attention as beautifully as she did with the use of her body.

So if you have a speech opening that seems slightly dull, see if you can add some body movement to it.

If your speech starts with a story of someone running, actually act out the running. If your speech starts with a story of someone reading, actually act out the reading.

It will make your speech opening that much more impactful.

Related article: 5 Body Language Tips to Command the Stage

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Final Words

So there it is! 15 speech openings from some of my favourite speeches. Hopefully, these will act as a guide for you to create your own opening which is super impactful and sets you off on the path to becoming a powerful public speaker!

But remember, while a speech opening is super important, it’s just part of an overall structure.

If you’re serious about not just creating a great speech opening but to improve your public speaking at an overall level, I would highly recommend you to check out this course: Acumen Presents: Chris Anderson on Public Speaking on Udemy. Not only does it have specific lectures on starting and ending a speech, but it also offers an in-depth guide into all the nuances of public speaking. 

Being the founder of TED Talks, Chris Anderson provides numerous examples of the best TED speakers to give us a very practical way of overcoming stage fear and delivering a speech that people will remember. His course has helped me personally and I would definitely recommend it to anyone looking to learn public speaking. 

No one is ever “done” learning public speaking. It’s a continuous process and you can always get better. Keep learning, keep conquering and keep being awesome!

Lastly, if you want to know how you should NOT open your speech, we’ve got a video for you:

Hrideep Barot

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Speech and Essay Samples

Don’t know where to start? Get inspired by our  FREE speech and essay examples .

Use them to get the creative juices flowing . Don’t copy any of these examples! Since these speeches are available for anyone to download, you can never be sure that another student has not used them, and that they will pass plagiarism evaluation tools, such as Turnitin or Plagscan.

Whether you find a sample that is on your given topic or a closely related discussion, all of the speeches can help you get organized and focused.

Review multiple speeches to learn:

  • How the presenter laid out the talking points and the number of points used
  • What references and statistics they used to solidify their arguments
  • How long the speech was for a given topic
  • How the topic was introduced and summarized
  • How the speaker engaged and interacted with the audience

By using these speech examples as an outline, you’ll have a fully formed presentation in no time ! We also have this page with gun control speech examples , in case you’d like to see different examples on the same topic.

Persuasive Speeches

  • Birth Control Persuasive Speech
  • We should stand up for our gun rights
  • The truth about gun control
  • The controversy over gun control
  • Speech against stricter gun control
  • It’s up to society to solve gun problems
  • Guns don’t kill people
  • Does banning firearms help prevent homicides
  • Criminals will be criminals
  • What to do about Deadbeat Parents
  • Why state aid applicants need to be drug tested
  • Subculture is Mainstream
  • Eating Healthy
  • Teachers should be paid more
  • Digital Piracy
  • Minimum Wage
  • Drug Testing for State Aid
  • Drug testing welfare
  • Why snakes make good pets
  • Why you need to quit drinking soda
  • Why Everyone Should Learn to Play an Instrument
  • Why Android is better then IOS 2
  • Why Android is better then IOS 1
  • Video Games Do Not Cause Violence
  • Soda and Obesity
  • Plastic Surgery 2
  • Plastic Surgery
  • Maintaining A Healthy Lifestyle
  • Human development depends primarily on environmental factors
  • Donating Blood
  • Birth Control Persuasive Speech Example with Outline
  • Social Media Persuasive Speech Example with Outline
  • Texting and Driving Persuasive Speech Example with Outline
  • Persuasive Speech on Sleep
  • Persuasive Speech about Bullying
  • Persuasive Speech on Organ Donation

Informative Speeches

  • Guns and gun control - Texas
  • Gun violence and control
  • Gun control on campuses
  • Wind Energy
  • About Serial Killers
  • Eating Disorder
  • Robin Williams 2
  • Dream Types
  • Separation of Powers of the Federal Government
  • Memory Loss
  • Internet Black Market
  • Blood Donation
  • Alcohol in Winter
  • About Guitar
  • Social Media Informative Speech Example with Outline
  • Texting and Driving Informative Speech Example with Outline
  • Informative Speech on Sleep
  • Informative Speech about Bullying
  • Free Organ Donation Informative Speech
  • Free Informative Speech on Caffeine and Its Effects
  • Five Side Effects of Global Warming
  • Global Warming Is Real

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Speech Writing

Speech Format

Barbara P

Understanding the Speech Format - Detailed Guide & Examples

Published on: Oct 13, 2018

Last updated on: Nov 13, 2023

speech format

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Are you looking for the optimal speech format that will help you leave a lasting impact on your listeners?

Well, some speakers can’t deliver a speech without a well-written script in their hand. Whereas, some avoid using a written speech because they believe that reading makes them feel uncomfortable and stiff.

A successful speech depends on both careful preparation and effective presentation. Hence, speech writing is very important.

Writing a speech should not be a nail-biting or anxiety-provoking experience. If you learn the basic speech format, you can excel in speech writing !

Having said that, this step-by-step guide on speech format can make the nerve-racking task of speech delivery simple and straightforward.

Let’s get started!

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How to Write a Speech Format?

Speech writing gives you a chance to leave an everlasting and meaningful impression on the audience. You might have always believed that you are not good with words. And speech writing may bring you out in cold sweats, but this is different.

Let’s see how one should write a great speech that impresses the audience.

1. Decide the Purpose of Your Speech 

To understand the purpose of your speech, consider these queries:

  • What is the main motive behind it?
  • Is it to inform or persuade? Is it to entertain or demonstrate? Or is it a combination of these?
  • What do you want to achieve with your speech?
  • Do you want your audience to act upon something, or do you want to convince them to believe what you are saying?

Your answer to all of these questions will decide the organizational structure, type of speech, tone, and content as well. 

Identify your listeners and decide which type of speech is suitable for your targeted audience. If you are going to deliver a speech at a wedding, write a special occasion speech . Similarly, if your motive is to persuade the audience, you’ll have to write a persuasive speech .

2. Choose a Speech Topic 

Choose an effective speech topic that catches the audience’s attention immediately. A good speech topic is your first step to impress the audience.

You can select any topic according to the type of speech you need to deliver. Pick a motivational speech topic if you want to get the audience to act upon your message. If you want to make your audience laugh, decide on an entertaining speech topic .

3. Do the Research 

Conduct thorough research on your particular subject to collect relevant material. Finding credible and updated material is crucial, as good research is the backbone of sound speech. 

Before you write your speech, you need to know what your speech will be about exactly. And how long it needs to be, i.e., 5 minutes or 30 minutes long. So, always collect the data according to the time limit. 

For a 5-minute speech, you only need a brief material. Your speech should revolve around the central idea. If your speech is 30 minutes long, you need to collect enough details to cover in 30 minutes. 

4. Craft the Outline 

Now that you have the material for your speech, craft an outline to organize your material. Drafting an outline at first always saves precious time. 

Write keywords in the outline that prompt you to remember what you’ll include in your speech. Having an outline for your speech is like having a road map that guides you throughout the speech delivery.

As mentioned before, the basic speech outline format consists of three things:

  • Introduction

Here is a speech outline template that you can use while crafting an outline for your speech.

Speech Format Outline

5. Write an Effective Introduction 

An introduction will give a brief overview of what you are going to tell your audience. Here are the five things that you should include in your introduction paragraph.

  • Greetings and Your Introduction

Decide how you are going to greet your audience and how you will introduce yourself to the audience. You can start with a fact, a quotation, posing a rhetorical question, or even with one-liner humor. 

Keep in mind that whatever you start with, must be related to your topic and suitable for your audience.

  • A Precise Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is a brief summary of your speech, and it provides the main message of your speech. 

  • Your Credibility

You need to establish your credibility to make your speech effective. Cite your expertise and qualification that gives you the right to speak about your speech topic.

  • Brief Overview

Briefly tell your audience what you are going to share so that they have an idea of what to expect from your speech. 

  • Benefits of Listening to Your Speech

Convince your audience why they should listen to you. Tell them what's in your speech for them and why should they pay attention. Give them reasons and be specific about the benefits.

6. Write a Detailed Body 

The body is where you write the details of what you want to share with your audience. Generally, the body section has three main points, but it can have more than 3 points.

It is always a good idea to be specific and inform the audience of only essential things. 

Quite frankly, if you introduce the audience to an abundance of ideas or topics, they might not remember them all! To leave a lasting impact, decide on 2 or 3 ideas, so the crowd remembers them all!

While crafting the body section of your speech, you should keep the following things in mind:

  • Choose the three strongest points that describe your topic efficiently. 
  • Always provide supporting examples. Make sure that the evidence you provide matches the type of speech you are going to write.
  • Use transition phrases to make a logical connection between the details.
  • Use visual aids like images, graphs, or tables to help your audience understand your topic better.
  • Keep the sentence structures in check. Make sure there are no grammatical errors and follow an engaging tone. 

7. Craft a Compelling Conclusion

The final section is the conclusion that sums up the whole speech. Here is how you can write an effective speech conclusion that summarizes and draws all the details together:

  • Summarize all the main points
  • Restate the thesis statement to reinforce your message
  • Remind the audience about the benefits they’ll get if they carry out what you have proposed.
  • Provide a call to action at the end of your speech

8. Do the Formatting 

After the final draft, the next step is editing and formatting. Read your speech aloud and check the flow and organization of the information. Refine the draft by removing unnecessary things and correcting any grammatical mistakes.

Proofread your speech to make sure it contains all the vital information. Correct the structure if needed, and ensure that your speech is free from all kinds of mistakes. Revise your speech as many times as possible.

How to Rehearse a Speech

Rehearsal plays an important role in delivering an effective presentation. You need to practice a lot to be confident with your speech and deliver it perfectly. Here is how you can do it efficiently:

  • Set the time on the stopwatch that is going to be allocated to you. You need to finish your speech within the allocated time.
  • Read your speech out loud. Hearing yourself will help you familiarize yourself with the flow of your speech quickly. Remove or change the phrases that sound awkward, and fix the organization of information.
  • Your habitual unconscious gestures
  • Irregular breathing because of long sentences
  • Taking breaks or pauses at the wrong places
  • The body posture
  • Raising or dropping the voice
  • Repeated fillers, i.e., umm, err, uhh, etc
  • Lack of smiling and eye contact
  • Tone variation
  • If you experience any problems, stop and fix the problem before starting again from where you left off.
  • Make notes of where you need to remember to do something. It will help you improve your speech delivery.
  • If possible, do a proper dress rehearsal at the actual venue in front of a bunch of friends. It will help you to get comfortable with the dress, stage, and actual presentation situation.

If you’ve plenty of time, rehearse at least three times or more, before the final presentation. The more you do the rehearsals, the more you build up your confidence and the easier it becomes to deliver your speech.

Now, let’s take a look at some comprehensive speech format examples for multiple academic levels and various occasions.

Speech Format Examples for Different Academic Levels

Follow these speech format samples to learn how to properly format a speech and easily get through the speech writing process.

Speech Format for Class 8

Speech Format for Class 9

Speech Format for Class 10

Speech Format for Class 11

Speech Format for Class 12

O Levels Speech Format

Speech Format Examples for Different Occasions

Best Man Speech Format

College Speech Format

Debate Speech Format

Impromptu Speech Format

Formal Speech Format

Welcome Speech Format in English

Persuasive Speech Format

Public Speech Format

Informative Speech Format

Extemporaneous Speech Format

Want to see some outstanding speech examples ? Head over to our detailed blog!

Wrapping it up, if you came up with a speech after following the guide, you should be able to grab the attention of the audience within seconds! 

This guide contains all the essentials to crafting a compelling speech and presenting it in a meaningful way!

However, if you still need some help, you can hire a professional writer. Our speech writing service provides top-notch speeches at cheap prices.

Order now and get expertly crafted speeches to impress your audience. Hire our reliable essay writing service and let our experts handle your speech writing needs!

Barbara P (Literature, Marketing)

Dr. Barbara is a highly experienced writer and author who holds a Ph.D. degree in public health from an Ivy League school. She has worked in the medical field for many years, conducting extensive research on various health topics. Her writing has been featured in several top-tier publications.

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Essay and Speech Examples, Essay Writing Notes, English Speech and Essay Topics

You can learn all about essay writing and English speech with the key points and explanations provided here. There are basic rules for a presenter to lay out the points while either talking or writing. You just need to understand the elements of expression, argume nt, references and some language rules to produce a good essay and correct form of speeches .

Read the entire article to understand the ways for writing the best essays and also learn about the use of English speech. We have provided some speech examples for you to comprehend the rules of language along with some good essay topics for practising.

Essay Writing

Essay writing holds a major place in a student’s academic life. It teaches a student to express their opinio ns and offer a valid perspective. This validation is refined with the use of some certain standard essay writing techniques . Learn all about them by reading the listed points below:

Types of Essays:

1. Descriptive Essays: This type of essay paints a picture of the scene to the reader. Here, the writer should supposedly appeal to make the reader feel, smell, hear and see the things that they are describing. This essay is very detailed in nature, allowing the reader to experience the scene. Writers can use this essay genre to create a piece of text which is extremely stimulating.

2. Narrative Essays : A narrative essay creates a plot for the readers by introducing the characters, settings and leading to a climax then conclusion. This essay follows a traditional reading type- the format of a beginning, middle and the end of a scene. This essay is meant to be very interactive and it engages the reader to listen to the facts that the writer has to say and successfully convince the reader.

3. Expository Essays: This type of essay is most used in school writing classes to help students express their ideas concisely. This style of writing is used to freely express an opinion. This essay follows the format of an introductory paragraph, discussion paragraphs and then the conclusion. This essay should include evidence and references to support the opinion that is expressed. The writer here provides the reader with a final thought by the conclusion to make an impact on the reader’s perspective.

4. Persuasive Essays: As the name suggests, this type of essay attempts to persuade the reader to agree with the writer’s point of view. It is about stating your opinion, laying down some facts and convincing the reader to consider the writer's perspective. In this essay, the entire focus should be on proving the opinion as correct. Writer should be clear and considerate while writing the essay.

5. Argumentative Essays: This type of essay is majorly written on a controversial topic or an issue and the writer attempts to provide certain evidence to support his argument. This kind of essay is similar to persuasive writing style but argumentative essays require a tremendous amount of research and all the different viewpoints are considered rather than just the writer’s. The conclusion of this essay is persuasive; however, the argument is supported with plenty of evidence.

Essay Writing Format

The following format is considered as the common writing style to write every type of essay.

Introduction  

Introducing the topic/setting/scene/argument

Laying down of the major discussion points

A concise paragraph

Points put forward/narration of the scene

Main discussion which includes putting forward the opinions/expressions/evidences

Maintaining the flow of description/narration/argument.

Restating all the points in a very short and concise manner.

Giving the final conclusionary point.

Stating the call of action or opinion.

Essay Topics

You can practise essay writing on the below listed topics:

Pollution due to urbanisation

Education Essay

Social Media Essay

Wonder of Science

Newspaper and it’s current value

Children’s day

Republic Day

Contribution of technology in education

Abraham Licoln

Subhash Chandra Bose

Swami Vivekananda

Rabindranath Tagore

My Aim in Life

Father's Day Essay

Save Earth Essay

Environmental Pollution

Natural disasters

Essay Topics for College Students

Academic interest

Social consciousness 

Self-introspection 

Globalisation 

Political air on college students

Education system

Points to Remember When Writing an Essay 

There are some techniques to write a beautiful essay which is stimulating yet understandable. Read the following points to enhance your essay writing skills:

Analyse the topic carefully and decide the content matter which centralises that topic.

Students tend to deviate from the topic when they get engaged in writing a longer essay; to avoid this from happening, you should practise writing small paragraphs on the suggested topics above mentioned then gradually increase the length of paragraphs.

Introduce the setting or the argument first then define your argument.

Use reasoning to support your point of view such as giving real life examples or proven facts.

You can also support your argument by referring to reasonable perspectives.

Organise your essay as a coherent piece of writing. You should keep all the points linked with each other and present them chronologically as mentioned in the essay writing format.

Write clearly, don’t attempt too hard to use difficult words or phrases between your lines. You can add a quote once or twice.

A speech is a verbal presentation that is meant to prove a certain point. Speeches are delivered with the goal of convincing the audience to buy into your idea or to attract attention to your discussion. Making a speech or even writing one can sound a bit intimidating but with the right techniques and plenty of content knowledge, anyone can write a speech.

Here, you can learn about the structure of speech, know about a sample of speech, its elements and aspects. You are advised to take note of the further below mentioned points and get an idea about how to write a brilliant speech. We have provided the accurate format of speech along with speech examples for students to learn.

Types of Speech

Learn about various types of speeches:

Demonstrative : this type of speech provides information on a subject and educates the audience about a topic. Here, the context is focused on demonstrating a way of doing a particular thing.

For example- A company gives the instructions to use their product along with demonstrating how the product works, this is a demonstrative speech.

Informative : Informative speech uses facts, reasonable arguments and statistics to support the assertions made. This type of speech is used to discuss social or economic issues. Informative speeches are used to inform the audience and not necessarily persuade or convince them.

Persuasive : Persuasive speech delivers the information along with evidence to persuade the audience and receive their support. The best example of persuasive speech is the work of a lawyer. When a lawyer delivers a speech, the facts and statistics are mentioned along with the stance of argument. This is the way persuasive speech works. This type of speech is also used to impact the emotions of the audience through the speaker/writer’s feelings.

Entertaining: This type of speech amuses the audience and it is less formal than traditional speech. Entertaining speech communicates through feelings rather than facts. They include humour or emotional elements and are often heard in birthday parties and weddings.

Speech Examples (Topics to Practise)

Should there be age restrictions on video games?

Are self-driving cars a good idea?

Allowing social media at school

Online interaction becoming a threat

Electric cars- an idea

Effect of television

Personal password security

Does social media broaden our viewpoints?

Importance of fitness

Value of time

Are dreams worth it?

Pursuit of happiness

Meaning of life

Importance of culture in our urban lives

India’s education system

Literacy rate of india 

Strategies to build a good educational platform

Is online education leading our country?

How will recycling secure our future?

How can school teach practical life skills?

Tips for Speech Research 

To write a good speech, the research behind the content should be accurate and vast. Here are some tips to help you enhance your writing and research skills for a making a speech:

Gather information about your topic by asking questions to the people around you, get to know the practical information first about the topic with the help of common opinions in your area.

Move on the theoretical knowledge, read some articles or content pages available online regarding the topic. You can also refer to books for acquiring information at a vast scale.

Frame your argument or opinion according to the facts you gathered, do not deviate from the reasonability of a point of view. In the case of entertaining speech, you can collect materials from the society you live in and create an entertaining speech.

While writing your speech, make sure to keep the content coherent and clear.

While delivering your speech, make sure to pay attention to your body language and enunciations. You can engage the audience by asking questions and replying to them as a part of your speech performance.

This was a brief discussion on essay writing and speeches. You can learn about the types of speech, essays, find topics to write short English essays on and practise writing with the help of essay topics and speech topics provided here. The tips to create the best piece of text are provided here to assist students in producing excellent essays and speeches.

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FAQs on Essay and Speeches

1. How do you write an essay?

When you are about to write an essay, keep the question in mind while you gather relevant information. Focus on collecting data first and then frame it in the format of the essay. You can follow the traditional format of beginning, middle and end or some other format as well of your choice. Imagine the place or the emotion you are writing about and attempt to use such words so that the reader experiences the validity of your argument. Integrate your facts, evidence and information carefully while you write.

2. How to start an essay?

Some common ways to start an essay are:

Picking a tone for your essay by stating the argument as the first thing.

Asking a question.

Sharing a shocking fact.

Sharing an amusing fact.

Dramatise your introduction of the topic.

3. How long is a good essay?

In school, you are expected to deliver a short essay that contains 4 to 5 paragraphs. However, essay length varies on the level of studies.

Essay length guidelines:

High school essay: 300-1000 words

Undergraduate essay : 1500-5000 words

4. What is the best topic for speech?

In contemporary society, the best topic to deliver a speech on would be education. The issue of mobile phones, uniforms, co-education and the country's education system is discussed on a large scale.There are plenty of topics under the education category, you can choose from a wide range of topics for making a speech.

5. What is a good speech?

A speech that is delivered slowly and in the usual tone so that the audience is able to understand clearly is considered a good speech. One important feature of a good speech is that it is not entirely biassed and neglectful of some important facts. A good speech always includes ubiquitous facts and stays focused and driven on the main theme of the topic.

6. What are some good short speeches?

These are a few examples of good short speeches: 

Abraham Lincoln’s “The Gettysburg Address”

Neil Armstrong’s Speech on The Moon

Winston Churchill’s “Never Give in”

Baz Luhrmann and Mary Schmich- “Everybody’s Free”

Largest text-to-speech AI model yet shows ’emergent abilities’

essay writing to speech

Researchers at Amazon have trained the largest ever text-to-speech model yet, which they claim exhibits “emergent” qualities improving its ability to speak even complex sentences naturally. The breakthrough could be what the technology needs to escape the uncanny valley.

These models were always going to grow and improve, but the researchers specifically hoped to see the kind of leap in ability that we observed once language models got past a certain size. For reasons unknown to us, once LLMs grow past a certain point, they start being way more robust and versatile, able to perform tasks they weren’t trained to.

That is not to say they are gaining sentience or anything, just that past a certain point their performance on certain conversational AI tasks hockey sticks. The team at Amazon AGI — no secret what they’re aiming at — thought the same might happen as text-to-speech models grew as well, and their research suggests this is in fact the case.

The new model is called Big Adaptive Streamable TTS with Emergent abilities , which they have contorted into the abbreviation BASE TTS. The largest version of the model uses 100,000 hours of public domain speech, 90% of which is in English, the remainder in German, Dutch and Spanish.

At 980 million parameters, BASE-large appears to be the biggest model in this category. They also trained 400M- and 150M-parameter models based on 10,000 and 1,000 hours of audio respectively, for comparison — the idea being, if one of these models shows emergent behaviors but another doesn’t, you have a range for where those behaviors begin to emerge.

As it turns out, the medium-sized model showed the jump in capability the team was looking for, not necessarily in ordinary speech quality (it is reviewed better but only by a couple points) but in the set of emergent abilities they observed and measured. Here are examples of tricky text mentioned in the paper :

  • Compound nouns : The Beckhams decided to rent a charming stone-built quaint countryside holiday cottage.
  • Emotions : “Oh my gosh! Are we really going to the Maldives? That’s unbelievable!” Jennie squealed, bouncing on her toes with uncontained glee.
  • Foreign words : “Mr. Henry, renowned for his mise en place, orchestrated a seven-course meal, each dish a pièce de résistance.
  • Paralinguistics (i.e. readable non-words): “Shh, Lucy, shhh, we mustn’t wake your baby brother,” Tom whispered, as they tiptoed past the nursery.
  • Punctuations : She received an odd text from her brother: ’Emergency @ home; call ASAP! Mom & Dad are worried…#familymatters.’
  • Questions : But the Brexit question remains: After all the trials and tribulations, will the ministers find the answers in time?
  • Syntactic complexities : The movie that De Moya who was recently awarded the lifetime achievement award starred in 2022 was a box-office hit, despite the mixed reviews.

“These sentences are designed to contain challenging tasks – parsing garden-path sentences, placing phrasal stress on long-winded compound nouns, producing emotional or whispered speech, or producing the correct phonemes for foreign words like “qi” or punctuations like “@” – none of which BASE TTS is explicitly trained to perform,” the authors write.

Such features normally trip up text-to-speech engines, which will mispronounce, skip words, use odd intonation or make some other blunder. BASE TTS still had trouble, but it did far better than its contemporaries — models like Tortoise and VALL-E.

There are a bunch of examples of these difficult texts being spoken quite naturally by the new model at the site they made for it. Of course these were chosen by the researchers, so they’re necessarily cherry-picked, but it’s impressive regardless. Here are a couple, if you don’t feel like clicking through:

https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/shh-its-starting.wav

https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/how-french.wav

https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/guiding-moonlight.wav

Because the three BASE TTS models share an architecture, it seems clear that the size of the model and the extent of its training data seem to be the cause of the model’s ability to handle some of the above complexities. Bear in mind this is still an experimental model and process — not a commercial model or anything. Later research will have to identify the inflection point for emergent ability and how to train and deploy the resulting model efficiently.

A representative for Amazon AI, Leo Zao (not an author of the paper), wrote that they don’t make any claims of exclusive emergent properties here.

“We think it’s premature to conclude that such emergence won’t appear in other models. Our proposed emergent abilities test set is one way to quantify this emergence, and it is possible that applying this test set to other models could produce similar observations. This is partly why we decided to release this test set publicly,” he wrote in an email. “It is still early days for a ‘Scaling Law’ for TTS, and we look forward to more research on this topic.”

Notably, this model is “streamable,” as the name says — meaning it doesn’t need to generate whole sentences at once but goes moment by moment at a relatively low bitrate. The team has also attempted to package the speech metadata like emotionality, prosody and so on in a separate, low-bandwidth stream that could accompany vanilla audio.

It seems that text-to-speech models may have a breakout moment in 2024 — just in time for the election! But there’s no denying the usefulness of this technology, for accessibility in particular. The team does note that it declined to publish the model’s source and other data due to the risk of bad actors taking advantage of it. The cat will get out of that bag eventually, though.

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  • A Research Guide
  • Writing Guide
  • Assignment Writing

How to Write a Speech

efore you are able to write a great speech, it is necessary to first learn a little bit about the different types of speeches and how one is made up. Not surprisingly, there are various types of speeches, and each will contain specific characteristics depending on their nature.

Tips for Beginners – How to write a speech

Similar to essays, every speech has three primary sections: The beginning (the introduction), the middle (the body) and the end (the conclusion.) Contrary to essays, speeches are designed to be heard rather than read. The best speeches are written in a manner that not only engages with the audience, but also holds their attention from start to finish. This, of course, necessitates that your speech must have ‘flair’ or ‘pizzazz’ something that draws the listener in.

The various types of speeches are:

  • Informative
  • Instructional
  • Entertaining
  • Special Occasion

Some Ideas How to start a speech

How you start your speech will depend largely on the reason you are delivering the speech. For example, the most powerful speeches that also happen to be informative in nature, often contain an introductory statement that not only introduces the topic being discussed but also piques the interest of the audience. It must be followed up by a strong transition into the main body of the speech.

Think of the attention grabbing portion of the introduction as the ‘hook’, it must be something that not only compels the audience to remain open-minded, but also encourages them to want to listen to everything you have to say.  How long is your introduction or speech supposed to be? That will depend specifically on the amount of time that you’ve been allotted to deliver your speech and whether or not there is a question and answer forum afterwards.

Speech Format – Is There Any?

As mentioned earlier, speech writing follow the same basic format as a traditional essay. There must be an introduction, a body and a conclusion. We discussed the introduction earlier.

There is no ‘set in stone’ rule when it comes to how the body of a speech must be organized. However there are a few speech tips to keep in mind.

  • Keep in chronological – this provides a more accurate order for the timeline of events
  • Present one key piece of information at a time
  • Follow a cause and effect pattern
  • Offer a full overview of the design or physical arrangement

Most speeches will have the body divided into three topic sections.

Lastly you would move on to the conclusion. More on that below.

A Short Guide How to write a speech outline

Writing an outline is one of the most crucial success factors for writing the best speeches, and often one of the most overlooked items.

Having an outline will not only save you time in the long run, it will help you to keep your thoughts organized and ensure that you are following proper structure and formatting.

Here is an example of how to make a speech outline you might use for reference purposes

  • Determine your topic
  • Get to know your audience
  • Determine the purpose of the speech
  • Decide how you will organize the speech
  • Jot down an attention grabbing intro statement
  • Redefine your thesis statement (summarize what the speech is about)
  • State something that establishes credibility
  • Transition from the intro to the body
  • Offer your main idea and supporting information
  • Provide examples and as much detail as needed
  • Offer a summary of the body and the main points
  • Jot down a strong call to action or closing statement

Ways How to end a speech

Ending your speech properly requires that you not only restate your main points, but also leave the audience with something to think about. Some people choose to do this by prompting listeners to consider a statement or by reciting a quote. Ideally, you are looking for something that neatly wraps up the entire speech, but also offers a bit of a twist or call to action.

Regardless of the nature of your speech, there are certain things that you will want to consider including. They are:

  • Witty or relevant quotes
  • Funny stories or anecdotes that have a purpose
  • Strong transitions that are meaningful and make sense
  • A solid ending

The most important thing to consider when writing a speech comes from knowing who you are writing it for. You need to be able to convey passion and eagerness, but you also want your audience to share in your eagerness with their own enthusiasm. This means you need to be able to write attention-grabbing statements that pique their interest and not just your own.

Some of Speech Examples You May Find Useful

When preparing to write (or deliver) a speech, there is merit in reading or listening to famous speeches to pick up on little things like transitions, body language, openers and how strong conclusions are delivered.

Here are a few world-famous great speeches that you can refer to:

  • I have a dream by Martin Luther King
  • The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln
  • T he Infamy Speech by Franklin Roosevelt
  • Barak Obama’s Election Speech
  • Checkers Speech by Richard Nixon

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How To Write A Speech

Table of Contents

Content of this article

  • Classification

Introduction

  • Tips for writing a good speech
  • Sample for speakers

How To Write A Speech (Complete Guide)

Giving a speech is not as easy as some natural orators make it to be. It requires adequate preparation as well as planning and in some cases, it is easier to order the speech at ghostwriting service . Even good speakers get it wrong sometimes and find themselves giving the wrong speech or deviating from the theme of an event. People only get the part where someone walks before an audience and delivers whatever they have written down or whatever the Teleprompters have. However, speeches are first written and this is the point where things often go wrong. While preparing a speech entails reading and working on oneself, that is, audibility and confidence, writing a speech calls for a good mastery of language and also requires writers to equip themselves with enough vocabulary. Speeches can be formal and informal, but in both occasions, prior preparation is needed. People often take for granted the aspect of preparation, but as many have found out the hard way, preparation spares one of the embarrassments of getting something as obvious facts wrong.

The first step to writing a good speech is choosing the right or appropriate topic. All good speeches aim at passing some information to the audience. The information must be relevant or in line with the occasion or the theme of the event. Some audiences can be intimidating, and if one chooses the wrong topic for an event, the result will entail a bored audience as well as a shuttered self-esteem among some orators. Some people have developed phobias simply because of having chosen the wrong topic for their speech. While some audiences are forgiving, others might even get offended and ask the speaker to leave the stage. Topic selection is thus an important ingredient in giving a good speech. One of the obvious instructions when choosing a topic is to make sure that it is relevant to the event and appeals to the audience’s interests.

Speech classification

There are different types of speeches, and it is essential that speakers understand when to give which one. They include:

  • demonstrative,
  • persuasive ,
  • informative ,
  • and finally entertaining speeches.

Each of the above is given on a different occasion and understanding the theme of an event is crucial. A demonstrative speech aims at educating an audience about an idea /object or phenomenon. Speakers who give demonstrative speeches also make use of presentations that include the use of pictures as well as designs that help to reinforce the message. An informative speech is almost the same as a demonstrative speech but differs in the fact that it does not make use of demonstrations. When giving an informative speech, speakers talk extensively about objects, events, processes, or concepts and this ensures that their message is delivered. On the other hand, a persuasive speech seeks to persuade the audience. Speakers giving this kind of speech aim at convincing their audience that their opinion is indeed factual and credible. Finally, an entertaining speech aims at amusing people and helps to create a happy mood. These are often given in graduation and wedding ceremonies.

Every speech must have a purpose /thesis or an underlying message that the speaker aims at delivering to their audience. When writing a speech, it is important to define the message that one intends to pass clearly. Whether it was an assignment at school or a speech at a wedding or an organization’s annual meeting, the writer must ensure that they write their speech around the specific message that they wish to pass. Understanding the type of speech one is required to give is the first step to finding a thesis for a speech. The above provides writers with a starting point because it makes their end goal clear, that is, writing to entertain, educate or persuade. The thesis must hence be established first before the writer delves into writing the entire speech.

A speech outline is of great importance and guides the writer on what they need to do while writing the different sections. As with any piece of writing, mostly essays, the format is the same, that is, introduction, body, and finally a conclusion. Each of these sections aims at developing the central theme of the speech.

Typical speech structure

In the introduction, the writer needs to briefly but clearly establish the message or underlying theme of the speech. Audiences differ, and while some might stick around for the entire speech, a majority expect to hear the speaker’s theme in the introduction.

A thesis carries the speech’s message or theme. If left out, the speech would be flat and lacks a sense of direction or purpose. If for example, the speech written is about a suicide bombing that took place in the market, the thesis statement can be about how the world can foster peace and insist on love.

Regardless of the events in the market, it is important for the world to consider a strategy that is not aimed at ending more lives. Preaching and insisting on love can indeed help avert the dangers of terrorism and ensure that people love others as they love themselves.

The body supports the thesis statement and builds on it. When writing a speech, it is important to have topic sentences that represent the main points that support the main theme. These need to stand out, and the audience needs to know when the speaker is going through them.

How to finish a speech is not a challenging task. When writing a conclusion for a speech, the writer needs to recap the highlights of a speech. A summary of the speech’s core message makes up a speech conclusion.

Tips for speech writing

There are different speech writing tips and if adhered to can help one to deliver a high-quality speech. Things like the choice of vocabulary and understanding the theme of the event are of great importance when writing a speech, but other tips can help writers to write high-quality and relevant speeches.

Below are some tips for an effective speech:

  • Be memorable –On some occasions, the audience only remembers a single line from a speech. It is, therefore, important to condense the speech’s theme into a few words that the audience can easily remember.
  • Avoid wasting the opening – Audiences are most receptive during the opening stages of speech. However, some speechwriters waste the opportunity of maintaining them by starting low. It is thus essential to include shocking facts or make a joke or start with a question and in some instances engage the audience by seeking answers to the question.
  • Maintain eye contact –making and maintaining eye contact is a strategy that speakers can use to engage their audience personally.
  • Always speak of things that mean something to you –this induces passion as well as originality. It is easy for an audience to tell when someone is faking it but when they see and feel the speaker’s passion for a particular subject, they get hooked and offer their full attention.
  • Repeat yourself –Emphasis is true of great importance. The speech’s keywords, theme, as well as phrases should always be reinforced. This also helps to make the speech more memorable.

Speech sample

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Illustration shows ChatGPT logo and AI Artificial Intelligence words

How to get away with AI-generated essays

Prof Paul Kleiman on putting ChatGPT to the test on his work. Plus letters from Michael Bulley and Dr Paul Flewers

No wonder Robert Topinka found himself in a quandary ( The software says my student cheated using AI. They say they’re innocent. Who do I believe?, 13 February ). To test ChatGPT’s abilities and weaknesses, I asked it to write a short essay on a particular topic that I specialised in. Before looking at what it produced, I wrote my own 100% original short essay on the same topic. I then submitted both pieces to ChatGPT and asked it to identify whether they were written by AI or a human. It immediately identified the first piece as AI-generated. But then it also said that my essay “was probably generated by AI”.

I concluded that if you write well, in logical, appropriate and grammatically correct English, then the chances are that it will be deemed to be AI-generated. To avoid detection, write badly. Prof Paul Kleiman Truro, Cornwall

Robert Topinka gets into a twist about whether his student’s essay was genuine or produced by AI. The obvious solution is for such work not to contribute to the final degree qualification. Then there would be no point in cheating.

Let there be real chat between teachers and students rather than ChatGPT , and let the degree be decided only by exams, with surprise questions, done in an exam room with pen and paper, and not a computer in sight. Michael Bulley Chalon-sur-Saône, France

Dr Robert Topinka overlooks a crucial factor with respect to student cheating – so long as a degree is a requirement to obtain a reasonable job, then chicanery is inevitable. When I left school at 16 in the early 1970s, an administrative job could be had with a few O-levels; when I finished my PhD two decades ago and was looking for that sort of job, each one required A-levels, and often a degree. I was a mature student, studying for my own edification, and so cheating was self-defeating. Cheating will stop being a major problem only when students attend university primarily to learn for the sake of learning and not as a means of gaining employment. Dr Paul Flewers London

  • Artificial intelligence (AI)
  • Higher education
  • Universities

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How to use Copilot Pro to write, edit, and analyze your Word documents

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Microsoft's Copilot Pro AI offers a few benefits for $20 per month. But the most helpful one is the AI-powered integration with the different Microsoft 365 apps. For those of you who use Microsoft Word, for instance, Copilot Pro can help you write and revise your text, provide summaries of your documents, and answer questions about any document.

First, you'll need a subscription to either Microsoft 365 Personal or Family . Priced at $70 per year, the Personal edition is geared for one individual signed into as many as five devices. At $100 per year, the Family edition is aimed at up to six people on as many as five devices. The core apps in the suite include Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote.

Also: Microsoft Copilot vs. Copilot Pro: Is the subscription fee worth it?

Second, you'll need the subscription to Copilot Pro if you don't already have one. To sign up, head to the Copilot Pro website . Click the Get Copilot Pro button. Confirm the subscription and the payment. The next time you use Copilot on the website, in Windows, or with the mobile apps, the Pro version will be in effect.

How to use Copilot Pro in Word

1. open word.

Launch Microsoft Word and open a blank document. Let's say you need help writing a particular type of document and want Copilot to create a draft. 

Also: Microsoft Copilot Pro vs. OpenAI's ChatGPT Plus: Which is worth your $20 a month?

A small "Draft with Copilot" window appears on the screen. If you don't see it, click the tiny "Draft with Copilot icon in the left margin."

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2. Submit your request

At the text field in the window, type a description of the text you need and click the "Generate" button.

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Submit your request.

3. Review the response and your options

Copilot generates and displays its response. After reading the response, you're presented with a few different options.

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Review the response and your options.

4. Keep, regenerate, or remove the draft

If you like the draft, click "Keep it." The draft is then inserted into your document where you can work with it. If you don't like the draft, click the "Regenerate" button, and a new draft is created. 

Also: What is Copilot (formerly Bing Chat)? Here's everything you need to know

If you'd prefer to throw out the entire draft and start from scratch, click the trash can icon.

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Keep, regenerate, or remove the draft.

5. Alter the draft

Alternatively, you can try to modify the draft by typing a specific request in the text field, such as "Make it more formal," "Make it shorter," or "Make it more casual."

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Alter the draft.

6. Review the different versions

If you opt to regenerate the draft, you can switch between the different versions by clicking the left or right arrow next to the number. You can then choose to keep the draft you prefer.

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7. Revise existing text

Copilot will also help you fine-tune existing text. Select the text you want to revise. Click the Copilot icon in the left margin and select "Rewrite with Copilot."

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Revise existing text.

8. Review the different versions

Copilot creates a few different versions of the text. Click the arrow keys to view each version.

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Review the different versions.

9. Replace or Insert

If you find one you like, click "Replace" to replace the text you selected. 

Also: ChatGPT vs. Microsoft Copilot vs. Gemini: Which is the best AI chatbot?

Click "Insert below" to insert the new draft below the existing words so you can compare the two.

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Replace or Insert.

10. Adjust the tone

Click "Regenerate" to ask Copilot to try again. Click the "Adjust Tone" button and select a different tone to generate another draft.

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Adjust the tone.

11. Turn text into a table

Sometimes you have text that would look and work better as a table. Copilot can help. Select the text you wish to turn into a table. Click the Copilot icon and select "Visualize as a Table."

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Turn text into a table.

12. Respond to the table

In response, click "Keep it" to retain the table. Click "Regenerate" to try again. Click the trash can icon to delete it. Otherwise, type a request in the text field, such as "remove the second row" or "make the last column wider."

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Respond to the table.

13. Summarize a document

Copilot Pro can provide a summary of a document with its key points. To try this, open the document you want to summarize and then click the Copilot icon on the Ribbon. 

Also: The best AI chatbots

The right sidebar displays several prompts you can use to start your question. Click the one for "Summarize this doc."

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Summarize a document.

14. Review the summary

View the generated summary in the sidebar. If you like it as is, click the "Copy" button to copy the summary and paste it elsewhere.

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Review the summary.

15. Revise the summary

Otherwise, choose one of the suggested questions or ask your own question to revise the summary. For example, you could tell Copilot to make the summary longer, shorter, more formal, or less formal. 

Also: The best AI image generators

You could also ask it to expand on one of the points in the summary or provide more details on a certain point. A specific response is then generated based on your request.

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Revise the summary.

16. Ask questions about a document

Next, you can ask specific questions about any of the content in a document. Again, click the Copilot icon to display the sidebar. In the prompt area, type and submit your question. Copilot displays the response in the sidebar. You can then ask follow-up questions as needed.

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Ask questions about a document.

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Guest Essay

The Most Important Writing Exercise I’ve Ever Assigned

An illustration of several houses. One person walks away from a house with a second person isolated in a window.

By Rachel Kadish

Ms. Kadish is the author of the novel “The Weight of Ink.”

“Write down a phrase you find abhorrent — something you yourself would never say.”

My students looked startled, but they cooperated. They knew I wouldn’t collect this exercise; what they wrote would be private unless they chose to share it. All that was required of them was participation.

In silence they jotted down a few words. So far, so good. We hadn’t yet reached the hard request: Spend 10 minutes writing a monologue in the first person that’s spoken by a fictitious character who makes the upsetting statement. This portion typically elicits nervous glances. When that happens, I remind students that their statement doesn’t represent them and that speaking as if they’re someone else is a basic skill of fiction writers. The troubling statement, I explain, must appear in the monologue, and it shouldn’t be minimized, nor should students feel the need to forgive or account for it. What’s required is simply that somewhere in the monologue there be an instant — even a fleeting phrase — in which we can feel empathy for the speaker. Perhaps she’s sick with worry over an ill grandchild. Perhaps he’s haunted by a love he let slip away. Perhaps she’s sleepless over how to keep her business afloat and her employees paid. Done right, the exercise delivers a one-two punch: repugnance for a behavior or worldview coupled with recognition of shared humanity.

For more than two decades, I’ve taught versions of this fiction-writing exercise. I’ve used it in universities, middle schools and private workshops, with 7-year-olds and 70-year-olds. But in recent years openness to this exercise and to the imaginative leap it’s designed to teach has shrunk to a pinprick. As our country’s public conversation has gotten angrier, I’ve noticed that students’ approach to the exercise has become more brittle, regardless of whether students lean right or left.

Each semester, I wonder whether the aperture through which we allow empathy has so drastically narrowed as to foreclose a full view of our fellow human beings. Maybe there are times so contentious or so painful that people simply withdraw to their own silos. I’ve certainly felt that inward pull myself. There are times when a leap into someone else’s perspective feels impossible.

But leaping is the job of the writer, and there’s no point it doing it halfway. Good fiction pulls off a magic trick of absurd power: It makes us care. Responding to the travails of invented characters — Ahab or Amaranta, Sethe or Stevens, Zooey or Zorba — we might tear up or laugh, or our hearts might pound. As readers, we become invested in these people, which is very different from agreeing with or even liking them. In the best literature, characters are so vivid, complicated, contradictory and even maddening that we’ll follow them far from our preconceptions; sometimes we don’t return.

Unflinching empathy, which is the muscle the lesson is designed to exercise, is a prerequisite for literature strong enough to wrestle with the real world. On the page it allows us to spot signs of humanity; off the page it can teach us to start a conversation with the strangest of strangers, to thrive alongside difference. It can even affect those life-or-death choices we make instinctively in a crisis. This kind of empathy has nothing to do with being nice, and it’s not for the faint of heart.

Even within the safety of the page, it’s tempting to dodge empathy’s challenge, instead demonizing villains and idealizing heroes, but that’s when the needle on art’s moral compass goes inert. Then we’re navigating blind: confident that we know what the bad people look like and that they’re not us — and therefore we’re at no risk of error.

Our best writers, in contrast, portray humans in their full complexity. This is what Gish Jen is doing in the short story “Who’s Irish?” and Rohinton Mistry in the novel “A Fine Balance.” Line by line, these writers illuminate the inner worlds of characters who cause harm — which is not the same as forgiving them. No one would ever say that Toni Morrison forgives the character Cholly Breedlove, who rapes his daughter in “The Bluest Eye.” What Ms. Morrison accomplishes instead is the boldest act of moral and emotional understanding I’ve ever seen on the page.

In the classroom exercise, the upsetting phrases my students scribble might be personal (“You’ll never be a writer,” “You’re ugly”) or religious or political. Once a student wrote a phrase condemning abortion as another student across the table wrote a phrase defending it. Sometimes there are stereotypes, slurs — whatever the students choose to grapple with. Of course, it’s disturbing to step into the shoes of someone whose words or deeds repel us. Writing these monologues, my graduate students, who know what “first person” means, will dodge and write in third, with the distanced “he said” instead of “I said.”

But if they can withstand the challenges of first person, sometimes something happens. They emerge shaken and eager to expand on what they’ve written. I look up from tidying my notes to discover students lingering after dismissal with that alert expression that says the exercise made them feel something they needed to feel.

Over the years, as my students’ statements became more political and as jargon (“deplorables,” “snowflakes”) supplanted the language of personal experience, I adapted the exercise. Worrying that I’d been too sanguine about possible pitfalls, I made it entirely silent, so no student would have to hear another’s troubling statement or fear being judged for their own. Any students who wanted to share their monologues with me could stay after class rather than read to the group. Later, I added another caveat: If your troubling statement is so offensive, you can’t imagine the person who says it as a full human being, choose something less troubling. Next, I narrowed the parameters: No politics. The pandemic’s virtual classes made risk taking harder; I moved the exercise deeper into the semester so students would feel more at ease.

After one session, a student stayed behind in the virtual meeting room. She’d failed to include empathy in her monologue about a character whose politics she abhorred. Her omission bothered her. I was impressed by her honesty. She’d constructed a caricature and recognized it. Most of us don’t.

For years, I’ve quietly completed the exercise alongside my students. Some days nothing sparks. When it goes well, though, the experience is disquieting. The hard part, it turns out, isn’t the empathy itself but what follows: the annihilating notion that people whose fears or joys or humor I appreciate may themselves be indifferent to all my cherished conceptions of the world.

Then the 10-minute timer sounds, and I haul myself back to the business of the classroom — shaken by the vastness of the world but more curious about the people in it. I put my trust in that curiosity. What better choice does any of us have? And in the sanctuary of my classroom I keep trying, handing along what literature handed me: the small, sturdy magic trick any of us can work, as long as we’re willing to risk it.

Rachel Kadish is the author of the novel “The Weight of Ink.”

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips . And here’s our email: [email protected] .

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  2. 😎 Speech writing examples. 7 Speech Writing Examples in PDF. 2019-03-07

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  1. #1 Text To Speech (TTS) Reader Online. Free & Unlimited

    #1 Text To Speech (TTS) Reader Online. Free & Unlimited Player Voice Over Legacy #1 Text To Speech (TTS) Reader Online Proudly serving millions of users since 2015 Type or upload any text, file, website & book for listening online, proofreading, reading-along or generating professional mp3 voice-overs. I need to > Play Text Out Loud

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    What is text to speech? Text to speech (TTS) is a technology that converts text into spoken audio. It can read aloud PDFs, websites, and books using natural AI voices.

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    Essay reader. Read your essay out loud to write a better paper. Presentations. Use text-to-speech for impressive PowerPoint presentations and slideshow. Reading documents. Save your time reading documents aloud with a speech synthesizer. Book reader. Use our text-to-speech web app for ebook reading aloud with natural voices.

  4. Here's How to Write a Perfect Speech

    Joanna Cutrara Updated on May 22, 2019 Writing Tips Writing a speech isn't all that different than writing for other mediums. You need to know your audience, the required length, and the purpose or topic. This is true whether your speech is for a business conference, a wedding, a school project, or any other scenario.

  5. How To Turn an Essay Into a Speech

    January 29, 2022 by Ivana Haruki Murakami famously quotes that sometimes taking time is a shortcut. It is very alluring to take the easier way out instead of working up yourself trying to follow the correct way. However, the result of the two methods is as different as the east is from the west.

  6. How to Write a Good Speech: 10 Steps and Tips

    Create an outline: Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval. Write in the speaker's voice: While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style.

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    It should have "flair." Make your speech memorable by using attention-grabbing anecdotes and examples. Determine the Type of Speech You're Writing Since there are different types of speeches, your attention-grabbing techniques should fit the speech type.

  8. How to Write a Speech: 6 Tips for a Powerful Address

    Second Part: Describes a possible solution or set of solutions. Third Part: Summarizes how the solutions will solve the problem. 3. Write in the same tone as you speak. One of the most important public speaking tips is to remember that you are writing something that you will be speaking out loud for people to hear.

  9. How to Write a Speech

    For writing a speech, create an outline and flesh out your ideas within the structure. Learn about how to write a speech here. Get free topics and sample also.

  10. How to Write a Narrative Essay or Speech

    A narrative essay or speech is used to tell a story, often one that is based on personal experience. This genre of work comprises works of nonfiction that hew closely to the facts and follow a logical chronological progression of events. Writers often use anecdotes to relate their experiences and engage the reader.

  11. The Four Main Types of Essay

    An essay is a focused piece of writing designed to inform or persuade. There are many different types of essay, but they are often defined in four categories: argumentative, expository, narrative, and descriptive essays. Argumentative and expository essays are focused on conveying information and making clear points, while narrative and ...

  12. Free Speech to Text Online, Voice Typing & Transcription

    Speechnotes is a reliable and secure web-based speech-to-text tool that enables you to quickly and accurately transcribe your audio and video recordings, as well as dictate your notes instead of typing, saving you time and effort.

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    5. Add some personality and humor. Remember to let your personality shine through. This speech is more than just words on a page. Allow the audience to feel your passion and vigor. Force them to think about the message you're conveying. Share personal stories, fears, memories, or failures to help the audience relate to you as a person.

  14. 20+ Free Speech Examples to Craft the Best Speech

    1. Speech Examples 2. Tips to Write a Good Speech Speech Examples Talking in front of a bunch of audiences is not as easy as it seems. But, if you have some good content to deliver or share with the audience, the confidence comes naturally. Before you start writing your speech, it is a good idea that you go through some good speech samples.

  15. Text To Speech: #1 Free TTS Online With Realistic AI Voices

    The Best Text to Speech Converter Listen up to 9x faster with Speechify's ultra realistic text to speech software that lets you read faster than the average reading speed, without skipping out on the best AI voices. Try for free Listen & Read at the Same Time

  16. Learn Speech Writing in 10 Easy Steps with Examples

    1. What is Speech? 2. How to Write a Speech? 3. Speech Writing Format 4. Types of Speech Writing 5. Speech Writing Topics 6. Speech Writing Examples 7. Speech Writing Tips What is Speech? Speech, often regarded as the art of effective communication, is the act of expressing thoughts, ideas, or messages verbally in a structured manner.

  17. 15 Powerful Speech Opening Lines (And How to Create Your Own)

    Analyze their response and tweak the joke accordingly if necessary. Starting your speech with humour means your setting the tone of your speech. It would make sense to have a few more jokes sprinkled around the rest of the speech as well as the audience might be expecting the same from you. 4. Mohammed Qahtani.

  18. Speech and Essay Samples • My Speech Class

    Speech and Essay Samples Don't know where to start? Get inspired by our FREE speech and essay examples. Use them to get the creative juices flowing. Don't copy any of these examples!

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    1. How to Write a Speech Format? 2. How to Rehearse a Speech 3. Speech Format Examples for Different Academic Levels 4. Speech Format Examples for Different Occasions How to Write a Speech Format? Speech writing gives you a chance to leave an everlasting and meaningful impression on the audience.

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    Abraham Lincoln's "The Gettysburg Address". Neil Armstrong's Speech on The Moon. Winston Churchill's "Never Give in". Baz Luhrmann and Mary Schmich- "Everybody's Free". Share this with your friends. Find essay topics, speech examples and samples of a speech. Learn essay writing and about English speech with the help of ...

  21. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    understand why it's worth writing that essay. A strong thesis will be arguable rather than descriptive, and it will be the right scope for the essay you are writing. If your thesis is descriptive, then you will not need to convince your readers of anything—you will be naming or summarizing something your readers can already see for themselves.

  22. Largest text-to-speech AI model yet shows 'emergent abilities'

    Researchers at Amazon have trained the largest ever text-to-speech model yet, which they claim exhibits "emergent" qualities improving its ability to speak even complex sentences naturally.

  23. 40 Big Words That Make an Impact In Speech and Writing

    40 Big Words That Make an Impact In Speech and Writing By Alvin Park , Staff Writer Updated January 9, 2023 Image Credits Whether you're giving a rollicking good speech or writing the next great American novel, being effective comes down to using the right words.

  24. How to Write a Speech Format & Structure Examples

    Tips for Beginners - How to write a speech. Similar to essays, every speech has three primary sections: The beginning (the introduction), the middle (the body) and the end (the conclusion.) Contrary to essays, speeches are designed to be heard rather than read. The best speeches are written in a manner that not only engages with the audience ...

  25. How To Write A Speech, Samples Of Writing

    Thesis. A thesis carries the speech's message or theme. If left out, the speech would be flat and lacks a sense of direction or purpose. If for example, the speech written is about a suicide bombing that took place in the market, the thesis statement can be about how the world can foster peace and insist on love.

  26. How to get away with AI-generated essays

    To test ChatGPT's abilities and weaknesses, I asked it to write a short essay on a particular topic that I specialised in. Before looking at what it produced, I wrote my own 100% original short ...

  27. College Admissions Trends: AI, College Essays And Going ...

    Students Striving To Write More Authentic Essays. The Supreme Court's ruling to end affirmative action has caused a great deal of consternation among people of color in the nation.

  28. How to use Copilot Pro to write, edit, and analyze your Word ...

    For those of you who use Microsoft Word, for instance, Copilot Pro can help you write and revise your text, provide summaries of your documents, and answer questions about any document.

  29. Viewpoint-Based Distinctions Within Proscribable Speech

    Justice Antonin Scalia, writing for the majority, gave the following example: One could hold up a sign saying, for example, that all 'anti-Catholic bigots' are misbegotten; ... (White, J., concurring in the judgment) (referring to unprotected speech). Jump to essay-3 Id. at 388-91 ...

  30. Opinion

    "Write down a phrase you find abhorrent — something you yourself would never say." My students looked startled, but they cooperated. They knew I wouldn't collect this exercise; what they ...