10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

  • By Illiya Vjestica
  • - January 23, 2023

10 Powerful Examples of How to End a Presentation

Here are 10 powerful examples of how to end a presentation that does not end with a thank you slide.

How many presentations have you seen that end with “Thank you for listening” or “Any questions?” I bet it’s a lot…

“Thank you for listening.” is the most common example. Unfortunately, when it comes to closing out your slides ending with “thank you” is the norm. We can create a better presentation ending by following these simple examples.

The two most essential slides of your deck are the ending and intro. An excellent presentation ending is critical to helping the audience to the next step or following a specific call to action.

There are many ways you can increase your presentation retention rate . The most critical steps are having a solid call to action at the end of your presentation and a powerful hook that draws your audience in.

What Action do You Want Your Audience to Take?

Before designing your presentation, start with this question – what message or action will you leave your audience with?

Are you looking to persuade, inspire, entertain or inform your audience? You can choose one or multiple words to describe the intent of your presentation.

Think about the action words that best describe your presentation ending – what do you want them to do? Inspire, book, learn, understand, engage, donate, buy, book or schedule. These are a few examples.

If the goal of your presentation is to inspire, why not end with a powerful and inspiring quote ? Let words of wisdom be the spark that ignites an action within your audience.

Here are three ways to end your presentation:

  • Call to Action – getting the audience to take a specific action or next step, for example, booking a call, signing up for an event or donating to your cause.
  • Persuade – persuading your audience to think differently, try something new, undertake a challenge or join your movement or community.
  • Summarise – A summary of the key points and information you want the audience to remember. If you decide to summarise your talk at the end, keep it to no more than three main points.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

1. Asking your audience to take action or make a pledge.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

Here were asking the audience to take action by using the wording “take action” in our copy. This call to action is a pledge to donate. A clear message like this can be helpful for charities and non-profits looking to raise funding for their campaign or cause.

2. Encourage your audience to take a specific action, e.g. joining your cause or community

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

Here was are asking the audience to join our community and help solve a problem by becoming part of the solution. It’s a simple call to action. You can pass the touch to your audience and ask them to take the next lead.

3. Highlight the critical points for your audience to remember.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

Rember, to summarise your presentation into no more than three key points. This is important because the human brain struggles to remember more than three pieces of information simultaneously. We call this the “Rule of Three”.

4. If you are trying to get more leads or sales end with a call to action to book a demo or schedule a call.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

Can you inspire your audience to sign up for a demo or trial of your product? Structure your talk to lead your prospect through a journey of the results you generate for other clients. At the end of your deck, finish with a specific call to action, such as “Want similar results to X?”

Make sure you design a button, or graphic your prospect can click on when you send them the PDF version of the slides.

5. Challenge your audience to think differently or take action, e.g. what impact could they make?

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

6. Give your audience actions to help share your message.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

7. Promote your upcoming events or workshops

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

8. Asking your audience to become a volunteer.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

9. Direct your audience to learn more about your website.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

10. If you are a book author, encourage your audience to engage with your book.

10 Examples of How to End a Presentation

6 Questions to Generate an Ending for Your Presentation

You’ve told an engaging story, but why end your presentation without leaving your audience a clear message or call to action?

Here are six great questions you can ask yourself to generate an ending for your presentation or keynote talk.

  • What impression would you want to leave your audience with?
  • What is the big idea you want to leave them with?
  • What action should they take next?
  • What key point should you remember 72 hours after your presentation?
  • What do you want them to feel?
  • What is the key takeaway for them to understand?

What to Say After Ending a Presentation?

When you get to the end of a book, you don’t see the author say, “thank you for reading my last chapter.” Of course, there is no harm in thanking the audience after your presentation ends, but don’t make that the last words you speak.

Think of the ending of the presentation as the final chapter of an epic novel. It’s your chance to leave a lasting impression on the audience. Close with an impactful ending and leave them feeling empowered, invigorated and engaged.

  • Leave a lasting impression.
  • Think of it as the last chapter of a book.
  • Conclude with a thought or question.
  • Leave the audience with a specific action or next step.

How to End a Presentation with Style?

There are many great ways you can end your presentation with style. Are you ready to drop the mic?

Ensure your closing slide is punchy, has a clear headline, or uses a thought-provoking image.

Think about colours. You want to capture the audience’s attention before closing the presentation. Make sure the fonts you choose are clear and easy to read.

Do you need to consider adding a link? If you add links to your social media accounts, use icons and buttons to make them easy to see. Add a link to each button or icon. By doing this, if you send the PDF slides to people, they can follow the links to your various accounts.

What Should you Remember?

💡 If you take one thing away from this post, it’s to lose the traditional ending slides. Let’s move on from the “Thank you for your attention.” or “Any questions.” slides.

These don’t help you or the audience. Respect them and think about what they should do next. You may be interested to learn 3 Tactics to Free Your Presentation Style to help you connect to your audience.

Illiya Vjestica

Illiya Vjestica

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Best Ways to Conclude a Presentation

Last Updated: October 4, 2023 Fact Checked

Strategies for Wrapping up a Presentation

Other best practice presentation tips, public speaking advice, how should you end a presentation.

This article was co-authored by Patrick Muñoz and by wikiHow staff writer, Ali Garbacz, B.A. . Patrick is an internationally recognized Voice & Speech Coach, focusing on public speaking, vocal power, accent and dialects, accent reduction, voiceover, acting and speech therapy. He has worked with clients such as Penelope Cruz, Eva Longoria, and Roselyn Sanchez. He was voted LA's Favorite Voice and Dialect Coach by BACKSTAGE, is the voice and speech coach for Disney and Turner Classic Movies, and is a member of Voice and Speech Trainers Association. There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 5,113 times.

You’ve just spent the last hour or so preparing a super thorough and detailed presentation. Now it’s time to add the finishing touches and come up with an attention-grabbing and memorable closer. What strategies can you use to make sure that people really remember what you've said? Keep reading to learn all the most effective methods you can use to conclude your presentation in a way that’ll really stick with your audience. We'll cover different strategies you can mix and match to end your presentation with a bang, then follow up with public speaking tips. Let's dive in!

Things You Should Know

  • Bring your presentation to a close by first giving a clear indication that you’ll be wrapping up, followed by a short summary of your main ideas.
  • Grab your audience’s attention with a strong call to action and an explanation of what good things will happen when they listen to your message.
  • Make your presentation memorable by embellishing it with a powerful quote, a story, or a surprising statistic or fact.
  • Get your audience involved by running a poll or survey at the end of your presentation.

Step 1 Give a clear indication that the presentation is coming to an end.

  • “In conclusion…”
  • “In summary…”
  • “As I conclude my presentation, let me ask you a question.”
  • “This brings me to the end of my presentation today.”
  • “In respect of time, allow me to wrap up my last comments.”

Step 2 Provide a quick and concise summary of the presentation’s key points.

  • “That brings me to the conclusion of my presentation. If you’re to take anything away from my presentation today, let it be the three Cs of credit that we talked about: character, capacity, and capital.”
  • "Above all else, remember the acronym RAM: redesign, application, and management."

Step 3 Grab your audience’s attention with a strong call to action.

  • “When you volunteer for this program, you will build your skills and gain valuable experiences.”
  • “You will participate in the increased profitability of our company by joining this new program.”
  • “Make this company a more inclusive and healthy place to work by taking just a few minutes out of your day to do these small actions.”

Step 4 End your presentation with a powerful statement or quote.

  • “As the Greek historian Plutarch once said, ‘The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.’ Let’s kindle the fire within our minds and make the changes we want to see.”
  • “I’ll leave you today with a quote from Theodore Roosevelt: ‘Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.’”
  • “Work hard to inspire not only those around you, but yourself as well.”

Step 5 Present one last surprising statistic to grab people’s attention.

  • Pair this statistic or fact with a memorable visual, such as an illustrated graph, a video, or a picture. The more visual your presentation is, the more memorable it will be to your audience.

Step 6 Conclude by telling a story that encompasses your main ideas.

  • Another way to go about telling a story is to start it in your presentation’s intro and end it during the conclusion. Your audience will be curious to know how the story ends.

Step 7 Ask a rhetorical question that’ll make your audience think.

  • “What do you think the word ‘success’ means?”
  • “How can we make an impact every day through the work we do?”
  • “Why do you think people are so afraid of change and questioning the way things have always been done?”
  • Asking a question at the beginning of your presentation and answering it during the conclusion is another strategy to consider. Just be sure that you don’t forget to answer this question and accidentally leave your audience hanging.

Step 1 Put your Q&A section in the middle of your presentation instead of at the end.

  • “What’s your usual mood during the workday?”
  • “Have you ever presented your supervisor with a new idea or suggestion?”
  • “Do you see yourself participating in this new program?”

Step 4 Conduct a final...

  • What they liked and disliked about the presentation
  • What improvements could be made
  • One memorable thing they took away from your presentation

Step 1 Make your presentation about your audience and not solely about you.

  • Before your presentation, go and talk with some of the audience members. This will give them a chance to warm up to you and can help you feel more relaxed once you get up and start presenting.

Step 2 Use hand gestures to create an inviting atmosphere.

  • Using hand gestures also shows the audience that you’re in control of the space around you, and makes you appear much more confident and at ease.

Step 3 Maintain your professional stage presence before and after the presentation.

Expert Q&A

  • Keep in mind that your presentation gives you the chance to be a messenger. Give your audience something meaningful to walk with at the end of your speech. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

how to end a good presentation

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  • ↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/worst-ways-to-end-a-presentation-2014-7
  • ↑ https://www.washington.edu/doit/presentation-tips-0
  • ↑ https://www.wilmu.edu/edtech/documents/the-science-of-effective-presenations---prezi-vs-powerpoint.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.mentimeter.com/blog/awesome-presentations/ways-to-end-a-presentation-and-tools
  • ↑ https://www.niu.edu/presentations/organize/index.shtml
  • ↑ https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2017/11/02/15-methods-of-every-effective-public-speaker/?sh=3a911bdd3047
  • ↑ https://youtu.be/VRJzvJ5XPQI?t=11

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How To End A Presentation & Leave A Lasting Impression

By Krystle Wong , Aug 09, 2023

How To End A Presentation

So you’ve got an exciting presentation ready to wow your audience and you’re left with the final brushstroke — how to end your presentation with a bang. 

Just as a captivating opening draws your audience in, creating a well-crafted presentation closing has the power to leave a profound and lasting impression that resonates long after the lights dim and the audience disperses.

In this article, I’ll walk you through the art of crafting an impactful conclusion that resonates with 10 effective techniques and ideas along with real-life examples to inspire your next presentation. Alternatively, you could always jump right into creating your slides by customizing our professionally designed presentation templates . They’re fully customizable and require no design experience at all! 

Click to jump ahead:

Why is it important to have an impactful ending for your presentation?

10 effective presentation closing techniques to leave a lasting impression, 7 things to put on a conclusion slide.

  • 5 real-life exceptional examples of how to end a presentation

6 mistakes to avoid in concluding a presentation

Faqs on how to end a presentation, how to create a memorable presentation with venngage.

how to end a good presentation

People tend to remember the beginning and end of a presentation more vividly than the middle, making the final moments your last chance to make a lasting impression. 

An ending that leaves a lasting impact doesn’t merely mark the end of a presentation; it opens doors to further exploration. A strong conclusion is vital because it:

  • Leaves a lasting impression on the audience.
  • Reinforces key points and takeaways.
  • Motivates action and implementation of ideas.
  • Creates an emotional connection with the audience.
  • Fosters engagement, curiosity and reflection.

Just like the final scene of a movie, your presentation’s ending has the potential to linger in your audience’s minds long after they’ve left the room. From summarizing key points to engaging the audience in unexpected ways, make a lasting impression with these 10 ways to end a presentation:

1. The summary

Wrap up your entire presentation with a concise and impactful summary, recapping the key points and main takeaways. By doing so, you reinforce the essential aspects and ensure the audience leaves with a crystal-clear understanding of your core message.

how to end a good presentation

2. The reverse story

Here’s a cool one: start with the end result and then surprise the audience with the journey that led you to where you are. Share the challenges you conquered and the lessons you learned, making it a memorable and unique conclusion that drives home your key takeaways.

Alternatively, customize one of our cool presentation templates to capture the attention of your audience and deliver your message in an engaging and memorable way

3. The metaphorical prop

For an added visual touch, bring a symbolic prop that represents your message. Explain its significance in relation to your content, leaving the audience with a tangible and unforgettable visual representation that reinforces your key concepts.

4. The audience engagement challenge

Get the audience involved by throwing them a challenge related to your informational presentation. Encourage active participation and promise to share the results later, fostering their involvement and motivating them to take action.

how to end a good presentation

5. The memorable statistic showcase

Spice things up with a series of surprising or intriguing statistics, presented with attention-grabbing visual aids. Summarize your main points using these impactful stats to ensure the audience remembers and grasps the significance of your data, especially when delivering a business presentation or pitch deck presentation .

Transform your data-heavy presentations into engaging presentations using data visualization tools. Venngage’s chart and graph tools help you present information in a digestible and visually appealing manner. Infographics and diagrams can simplify complex concepts while images add a relatable dimension to your presentation. 

how to end a good presentation

6. The interactive story creation

How about a collaborative story? Work with the audience to create an impromptu tale together. Let them contribute elements and build the story with you. Then, cleverly tie it back to your core message with a creative presentation conclusion.

7. The unexpected guest speaker

Introduce an unexpected guest who shares a unique perspective related to your presentation’s theme. If their story aligns with your message, it’ll surely amp up the audience’s interest and engagement.

8. The thought-provoking prompt

Leave your audience pondering with a thought-provoking question or prompt related to your topic. Encourage reflection and curiosity, sparking a desire to explore the subject further and dig deeper into your message.

9. The empowering call-to-action

Time to inspire action! Craft a powerful call to action that motivates the audience to make a difference. Provide practical steps and resources to support their involvement, empowering them to take part in something meaningful.

how to end a good presentation

10. The heartfelt expression

End on a warm note by expressing genuine gratitude and appreciation for the audience’s time and attention. Acknowledge their presence and thank them sincerely, leaving a lasting impression of professionalism and warmth.

Not sure where to start? These 12 presentation software might come in handy for creating a good presentation that stands out. 

Remember, your closing slides for the presentation is your final opportunity to make a strong impact on your audience. However, the question remains — what exactly should be on the last slide of your presentation? Here are 7 conclusion slide examples to conclude with a high note:

1. Key takeaways

Highlight the main points or key takeaways from your presentation. This reinforces the essential information you want the audience to remember, ensuring they leave with a clear understanding of your message with a well summarized and simple presentation .

how to end a good presentation

2. Closing statement

Craft a strong closing statement that summarizes the overall message of your presentation and leaves a positive final impression. This concluding remark should be impactful and memorable.

3. Call-to-action

Don’t forget to include a compelling call to action in your final message that motivates the audience to take specific steps after the presentation. Whether it’s signing up for a newsletter, trying a product or conducting further research, a clear call to action can encourage engagement.

how to end a good presentation

4. Contact information

Provide your contact details, such as email address or social media handles. That way, the audience can easily reach out for further inquiries or discussions. Building connections with your audience enhances engagement and opens doors for future opportunities.

how to end a good presentation

Use impactful visuals or graphics to deliver your presentation effectively and make the conclusion slide visually appealing. Engaging visuals can captivate the audience and help solidify your key points.

Visuals are powerful tools for retention. Use Venngage’s library of icons, images and charts to complement your text. You can easily upload and incorporate your own images or choose from Venngage’s library of stock photos to add depth and relevance to your visuals.

6. Next steps

Outline the recommended next steps for the audience to take after the presentation, guiding them on what actions to pursue. This can be a practical roadmap for implementing your ideas and recommendations.

how to end a good presentation

7. Inspirational quote

To leave a lasting impression, consider including a powerful and relevant quote that resonates with the main message of your presentation. Thoughtful quotes can inspire and reinforce the significance of your key points.

how to end a good presentation

Whether you’re giving an in-person or virtual presentation , a strong wrap-up can boost persuasiveness and ensure that your message resonates and motivates action effectively. Check out our gallery of professional presentation templates to get started.

5 real-life exceptional examples of how to end a presentation 

When we talk about crafting an exceptional closing for a presentation, I’m sure you’ll have a million questions — like how do you end a presentation, what do you say at the end of a presentation or even how to say thank you after a presentation. 

To get a better idea of how to end a presentation with style — let’s delve into five remarkable real-life examples that offer valuable insights into crafting a conclusion that truly seals the deal: 

1. Sheryl Sandberg 

In her TED Talk titled “Why We Have Too Few Women Leaders,” Sheryl Sandberg concluded with an impactful call to action, urging men and women to lean in and support gender equality in the workplace. This motivational ending inspired the audience to take action toward a more inclusive world.

2. Elon Musk

Elon Musk often concludes with his vision for the future and how his companies are working towards groundbreaking advancements. His passion and enthusiasm for pushing the boundaries of technology leave the audience inspired and eager to witness the future unfold.

3. Barack Obama

President Obama’s farewell address concluded with an emotional and heartfelt expression of gratitude to the American people. He thanked the audience for their support and encouraged them to stay engaged and uphold the values that define the nation.

4. Brené Brown 

In her TED Talk on vulnerability, Brené Brown ended with a powerful quote from Theodore Roosevelt: “It is not the critic who counts… The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena.” This quote reinforced her message about the importance of embracing vulnerability and taking risks in life.

5. Malala Yousafzai

In her Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech, Malala Yousafzai ended with a moving call to action for education and girls’ rights. She inspired the audience to stand up against injustice and to work towards a world where every child has access to education.

For more innovative presentation ideas , turn ordinary slides into captivating experiences with these 15 interactive presentation ideas that will leave your audience begging for more.

So, we talked about how a good presentation usually ends. As you approach the conclusion of your presentation, let’s go through some of the common pitfalls you should avoid that will undermine the impact of your closing:

1. Abrupt endings

To deliver persuasive presentations, don’t leave your audience hanging with an abrupt conclusion. Instead, ensure a smooth transition by providing a clear closing statement or summarizing the key points to leave a lasting impression.

2. New information

You may be wondering — can I introduce new information or ideas in the closing? The answer is no. Resist the urge to introduce new data or facts in the conclusion and stick to reinforcing the main content presented earlier. By introducing new content at the end, you risk overshadowing your main message.

3. Ending with a Q&A session

While Q&A sessions are valuable, don’t conclude your presentation with them. Opt for a strong closing statement or call-to-action instead, leaving the audience with a clear takeaway.

4. Overloading your final slide

Avoid cluttering your final slide with too much information or excessive visuals. Keep it clean, concise and impactful to reinforce your key messages effectively.

5. Forgetting the call-to-action

Most presentations fail to include a compelling call-to-action which can diminish the overall impact of your presentation. To deliver a persuasive presentation, encourage your audience to take specific steps after the talk, driving engagement and follow-through.

6. Ignoring the audience

Make your conclusion audience-centric by connecting with their needs and interests. Avoid making it solely about yourself or your achievements. Instead, focus on how your message benefits the audience.

how to end a good presentation

What should be the last slide of a presentation?

The last slide of a presentation should be a conclusion slide, summarizing key takeaways, delivering a strong closing statement and possibly including a call to action.

How do I begin a presentation?

Grabbing the audience’s attention at the very beginning with a compelling opening such as a relevant story, surprising statistic or thought-provoking question. You can even create a game presentation to boost interactivity with your audience. Check out this blog for more ideas on how to start a presentation . 

How can I ensure a smooth transition from the body of the presentation to the closing? 

To ensure a smooth transition, summarize key points from the body, use transition phrases like “In conclusion,” and revisit the main message introduced at the beginning. Bridge the content discussed to the themes of the closing and consider adjusting tone and pace to signal the transition.

How long should the conclusion of a presentation be?

The conclusion of a presentation should typically be around 5-10% of the total presentation time, keeping it concise and impactful.

Should you say thank you at the end of a presentation?

Yes, saying thank you at the end of a PowerPoint presentation is a courteous way to show appreciation for the audience’s time and attention.

Should I use presentation slides in the concluding part of my talk? 

Yes, using presentation slides in the concluding part of your talk can be effective. Use concise slides to summarize key takeaways, reinforce your main points and deliver a strong closing statement. A final presentation slide can enhance the impact of your conclusion and help the audience remember your message.

Should I include a Q&A session at the end of the presentation?

Avoid Q&A sessions in certain situations to ensure a well-structured and impactful conclusion. It helps prevent potential time constraints and disruptions to your carefully crafted ending, ensuring your core message remains the focus without the risk of unanswered or off-topic questions diluting the presentation’s impact.

Is it appropriate to use humor in the closing of a presentation?

Using humor in the closing of a presentation can be appropriate if it aligns with your content and audience as it can leave a positive and memorable impression. However, it’s essential to use humor carefully and avoid inappropriate or offensive jokes.

How do I manage nervousness during the closing of a presentation?

To manage nervousness during the closing, focus on your key points and the main message you want to convey. Take deep breaths to calm your nerves, maintain eye contact and remind yourself that you’re sharing valuable insights to enhance your presentation skills.

how to end a good presentation

Creating a memorable presentation is a blend of engaging content and visually captivating design. With Venngage, you can transform your ideas into a dynamic and unforgettable presentation in just 5 easy steps: 

  • Choose a template from Venngage’s library: Pick a visually appealing template that fits your presentation’s theme and audience, making it easy to get started with a professional look.
  • Craft a compelling story or outline: Organize your content into a clear and coherent narrative or outline the key points to engage your audience and make the information easy to follow.
  • Customize design and visuals: Tailor the template with your brand colors, fonts and captivating visuals like images and icons, enhancing your presentation’s visual appeal and uniqueness. You can also use an eye-catching presentation background to elevate your visual content. 
  • Incorporate impactful quotes or inspiring elements: Include powerful quotes or elements that resonate with your message, evoking emotions and leaving a lasting impression on your audience members
  • Utilize data visualization for clarity: Present data and statistics effectively with Venngage’s charts, graphs and infographics, simplifying complex information for better comprehension.

Additionally, Venngage’s real-time collaboration tools allow you to seamlessly collaborate with team members to elevate your presentation creation process to a whole new level. Use comments and annotations to provide feedback on each other’s work and refine ideas as a group, ensuring a comprehensive and well-rounded presentation.

Well, there you have it—the secrets of how to conclude a presentation. From summarizing your key message to delivering a compelling call to action, you’re now armed with a toolkit of techniques that’ll leave your audience in awe.

Now go ahead, wrap it up like a pro and leave that lasting impression that sets you apart as a presenter who knows how to captivate, inspire and truly make a mark.

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How to End a Presentation with Punch (17 Techniques)

  • PowerPoint Tutorials
  • Presentation Design
  • March 5, 2019

In this post you’ll learn 17 different ways for how to end a presentation that you can test out.

Why worry about the ending?

Because how you end your presentation is just as important as how you start your presentation ( details here ).

If you start strong but flounder at the end of your presentation, what feeling are people going to be walking away with?

Not a good one, that’s for sure! That’s why the ending your presentation is so important.

1. Call to action

how to end a good presentation

2. Skip the Q&A at the end your presentation

how to end a good presentation

3. End your presentation with a rhetorical Question

how to end a good presentation

4. Conclude your speech with a story

how to end a good presentation

As you can learn in our post on the best ways to start a presentation ( details here ), emotional listeners retain more information. An emotional story, whether it’s funny, sad, or thought-provoking, is a sure fire way to engage your audience.

If you can, try to tie the beginning and end together with your stories, like Heather Lanier does here:

5. The power of 3 for your conclusion

how to end a good presentation

6. Come full circle at the end of your presentation

how to end a good presentation

  • Pose a question which you answer at the end
  • Tell a story and either refer to it or finish it at the end
  • Repeat the first slide, this work especially well with powerful images or quotes

7. Demonstrate your product

how to end a good presentation

8. End with an either / or scenario

how to end a good presentation

9. End your presentation on a high note

how to end a good presentation

10. A sound bite

how to end a good presentation

11. End with a provocative question

how to end a good presentation

12. Use the title close technique

how to end a good presentation

13. A quick presentation recap

how to end a good presentation

14. End with a powerful quote

how to end a good presentation

15. End with a strong visual image

how to end a good presentation

16. Close with a clear cut ending

how to end a good presentation

17. End your presentation on time

how to end a good presentation

What’s Next?

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How to End a Presentation (+ Useful Phrases)

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Most people are aware of the power of first impressions.

However, our appearance and the first words we utter are only one part of the impact we have on others.

Arguably, the final words we exchange during an interaction can have an even more lasting effect . And that applies to public speaking, too.

Obviously, the way you introduce yourself and the topic you’ll be discussing is important.

However, the end of a presentation should also be recognized as a crucial part of the experience .

With that in mind, this article will walk you through some:

  • Things you should consider before drafting your conclusion,
  • Tips for ending a presentation memorably,
  • Mistakes you should avoid, and
  • Phrases you can use to wrap up your speech.

But, before we discuss how to end a presentation, let’s establish why having an impactful conclusion is so essential.

How to end a presentation - cover

Table of Contents

Why is it important to have an impactful ending for your presentation?

In our article about starting a presentation , we explained how the steps of the motivated sequence framework correspond to the structure of the average presentation or speech.

As we have established, the introduction of a presentation mirrors the first step of that model. That means that one of its main goals is to get the listeners’ attention .

The central part of the speech, or the body , corresponds to the second, third, and fourth steps of the motivated sequence framework. In other words, it has to:

  • Introduce the audience’s need (or identify a problem the listeners are having),
  • Offer a way to satisfy (or resolve) that need, and
  • Help the listeners visualize the successful implementation of the speaker’s solution.

Having checked off these points, we arrive at the conclusion , i.e., the subject of this article.

That stage of a presentation corresponds to the final step of the motivated sequence model — which consists of the call to action .

So, the conclusion of a presentation allows the speaker to drive their point home and nudge the audience toward performing a specific action.

However, that’s not the only purpose of a conclusion.

According to the authors of Business Communication: Process & Product , the final section of a presentation should achieve 3 goals . It should:

  • Summarize the main themes of the presentation,
  • Leave the audience with a specific and noteworthy takeaway (i.e. propose a specific course of action), and
  • Include a statement that allows the speaker to leave the podium (or pass the mic) gracefully.

Above all, the ending of a presentation should be memorable , akin to the punchline of a joke.

Having said that, let’s talk about some factors you should consider as you’re writing the conclusion of your speech.

Things to consider before crafting the conclusion of your presentation

If you’re trying to figure out how to end a presentation, knowing the goals of a conclusion should help.

However, those objectives are only one part of the puzzle. To get the others, you should also consider:

  • Your audience’s demographic breakdown,
  • The general purpose of your presentation ,
  • The specific purpose of your presentation , and
  • Your thesis statement .

With that in mind, let’s see how each of these factors can help you develop an impactful conclusion for your presentation.

Factor #1: The demographic breakdown of the audience

As we have noted in our article about starting presentations, understanding the demographic breakdown of one’s audience is a crucial part of drafting a speech .

After all, the audience affects all of the choices we make — from the way we present ourselves to the vocabulary and the supporting materials we use during our presentations.

In our quest to learn more about the effect an audience can have on a presentation, we spoke to Persuasion Strategist Juliet Huck .

Having spent a significant portion of her professional career preparing people to take the witness stand, Huck knows a thing or two about adjusting one’s messaging to fit the preferences of one’s audience. She says:

Juliet Huck

“[The] ending [of] every presentation should be different and always based on the background of your audience. This should not be a blanket statement.  It also depends on if you are educating your audience or persuading them to make a decision in your favor.  You must do the homework on your audience prior to giving a presentation and end by leading them to your desired conclusion by giving them a conclusion they can relate to.”

But, if you’re not entirely sure how to take your audience into account when drafting your conclusion, consider the following questions:

  • How will your audience connect to the topic you’re discussing?
  • How can you relate the information you’re sharing to the listeners’ needs?
  • What would make your audience think back on your presentation in positive terms?
  • What would be the most effective way to get your point across to this specific audience?

Knowing whether your audience is friendly, neutral, uninterested, or hostile will also help you adjust your approach.

If nothing else, it’ll tell you whether you should stick to the facts or feel free to deliver a more casual or rousing speech.

Examples of different audience breakdowns

In our article about starting a presentation, we demonstrated our tips through 3 fictional speakers. So, let’s use the same presenters to illustrate this point.

  • Nick Mulder is talking about the dangers of phishing. He introduced himself as the head of the security department. So, we can assume that he’s speaking to an audience of fellow employees, perhaps even through video conferencing software. Therefore, he was addressing an internal problem the company was having in front of a fairly receptive audience.
  • Joan Miller is talking about how artificial intelligence is changing the future of the marketing industry. In her introduction, she mentioned having over four decades of experience in marketing. Consequently, we can infer that she’s speaking to an audience of marketing specialists who were previously unaware of her credentials.
  • Milo Green is talking about employee retention. In his introduction, he indicated that the audience may know him as the founder of Green & Co. So, he’s probably famous enough to be recognized by at least a portion of his audience. Between that and the subject of his presentation, we can assume that he’s talking to the upper management of other companies.

From our examples, we can see how the identity of the speaker and their level of familiarity with the listeners might affect the way they prepare their presentations .

Factor #2: The general purpose of your presentation

Understanding the general purpose of a speech brings you one step closer to knowing how to end a presentation.

According to the authors of Communicating at Work , most presentations can be sorted into one of 3 categories based on that factor. In that regard, your presentation could be:

  • Informative , aiming to expand the listeners’ knowledge and/or help them acquire a specific skill,
  • Persuasive , with the goal of changing the listeners’ opinions or encouraging them to behave a certain way, or
  • Entertaining , which is good for getting the audience to relax and look forward to upcoming speakers or events.

The general purpose of your presentation will naturally affect your conclusion because it will change what you choose to emphasize.

💡 Pumble Pro Tip

The basic goal of your presentation could correspond with the type of presentation you’re giving. To learn more about presentation types and styles, check out this article:

  • Presentation types and styles explained

Examples of defining the general purpose of a presentation 

Let’s see how our imaginary presenters would define the general purpose of their presentations.

  • The general purpose of our phishing expert’s presentation is informative . The speaker’s primary goal is to teach his coworkers how to recognize and defend themselves against phishing attempts.
  • Our marketing expert’s presentation is persuasive . She wants to change her listeners’ minds and make them more open to using AI in their marketing campaigns.
  • The last speaker’s presentation about employee retention is also persuasive . After all, the speaker is attempting to show his listeners how they can increase the employee retention rate at their own companies. However, depending on the circumstances surrounding the speech, it could also take on some entertaining qualities.

Factor #3: The specific purpose of your presentation

The specific purpose of a presentation is essentially the outcome you’re looking to achieve with your speech. Defining this goal will require you to know the answers to the following questions :

  • Who do you want to influence?
  • What do you want them to think or do?
  • How, when, and where do you want them to do it?

Ideally, the specific goal you come up with should be realistic and highly specific .

To that end, the authors of Communicating at Work recommend setting measurable goals . So, for example, instead of thinking: “ I want to get approval for my project. ”,

“I want my manager to let me set aside one day per week to work on this project. I also want them to let me ask one or two other people to help me with it.”

Having this kind of goal in mind will help you figure out how to wrap up your presentation.

Examples of defining the specific purpose of a presentation

So, how would our 3 speakers specify the desired outcomes of their presentations in measurable terms? Let’s see:

“I want the people in my company to understand the dangers of phishing attacks. They should learn the exact steps they need to take when they see a suspicious email in their inbox.”
“I want these marketing experts to be more knowledgeable about the way artificial intelligence works right now and understand how they can incorporate that software into their professional practice.”
“I want managers and HR professionals to know how they can make their companies a better place to work so they can keep their employee retention rate high.”

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Factor #4: Your thesis statement

Ultimately, defining the general and specific goals of your presentation is a great way to keep yourself on track when crafting your speech.

However, the audience doesn’t need to know those goals.

Instead, they can hear your thesis statement — a summary of your overall message .

You can treat this statement as the throughline of your presentation. It will appear at least once in the introduction, followed by a few repetitions throughout the body of the presentation.

Finally, you’ll also want to include that same idea in your conclusion at least once.

In addition to keeping you, as the speaker, grounded, that repetition also keeps your audience from wondering what your presentation is about .

Examples of defining the thesis statement of a presentation

So, what would a thesis statement look like in practice? Let’s hear it from our fictional presenters:

“Identifying and reporting phishing emails will save the company’s information and money in the long term.”
“Right now, artificial intelligence isn’t as advanced as people think it is. However, we can still use it for marketing purposes as long as we make sure the process doesn’t begin and end with AI.”
“Improving your employee retention rate makes employees more engaged with their work and saves the company time and money that would otherwise go to training new personnel.”

How to end a presentation with a bang: 10 tips + examples

Now that we know why having an impactful conclusion is so crucial, it’s time to find the right way to achieve your goals.

To that end, we have highlighted 10 tips that might help you wrap up your presentation .

  • Reiterate the key points and your core message.
  • Mirror your opening statement.
  • Elicit a response.
  • Engage the audience.
  • Call to action.
  • Hand out materials.
  • Acknowledge your contributors.
  • Provide contact information.
  • Thank the audience.
  • Ask for feedback.

Of course, many of these methods we’ll discuss can be combined. However, your choices may be limited depending on the factors we have previously mentioned.

Tip #1: Reiterate the key points and your core message

Making sure the audience remembers your main points is one of the most important objectives your conclusion should accomplish.

With that in mind, you should dedicate some time at the end of your speech to reinforcing what you were trying to say throughout your presentation.

Take it from Mark Beal , Assistant Professor of Professional Practice, Communication, at Rutgers University:

Mark Beal

“Every presentation should deliver and consistently reinforce three key message points. Most audience members will not recall more than three messages. Some may only recall one or two. With that [in mind], an engaging and effective presentation should conclude with the three messages the presenter wants the audience to take away.”

In essence, you’ll want to summarize your presentation by reiterating up to 3 key points and then repeating your thesis statement.

You could even translate this tip to your presentation slides. As Juliet Huck says:

“Your last slide should always draw your audience to your desired conclusion. [It] should be your billboard message , as we remember 70% of what we see and 20% of what we hear.”

We can see what that might look like through the example of our imaginary presentation on the dangers of phishing, below.

The final slide of a presentation about phishing

Tip #2: Mirror your opening statement

According to the authors of Communicating at Work , splitting a narrative between the introduction and the conclusion of your presentation is a good way to keep your audience’s attention.

Assistant Professor of Rhetorical Communication at the State University of New York, Dr. Lee M. Pierce , agrees:

Dr. Lee M. Pierce

“Psychological closure is looping back to the beginning to give the audience a sense of a closed circle. Don’t add new information in the conclusion, just tie the presentation up with a bow. [For example,] I always customize my closings based on the opening of the speech. During a TEDx Talk on Beyoncé’s ‘Formation,’ I began by walking out to the introduction to the song, and then I ended by walking off to the end of the song.”

The above quote demonstrates that this tip can be useful no matter which method you used to start your presentation .

You can use it to put a new spin on a statistic you shared in the introduction, give a story you told a different ending, or finish the punchline of a joke you started with.

Overall, coming back to the theme you introduced at the beginning of your speech should make your presentation seem more complete and intentional .

Phrases you can use to reflect the introduction of your presentation in the conclusion

With all that being said, let’s see how our imaginary speakers would mirror the opening lines of their presentations in their conclusion.

Having started with a phishing statistic, our first speaker might say:

“Going back to the number we started with, remember that the Anti-Phishing Working Group has recorded 1,270,883 individual phishing attacks in the third quarter of 2022 — and that number is always on the rise. Luckily, you now have all the information you need to avoid becoming a part of that statistic.”

Our second speaker would have announced her plans to survey her listeners at the beginning of her presentation. In her conclusion, she might say:

“At the beginning of my presentation, I asked you to answer a quick survey on whether you’d be willing to work with AI. If you look back at your phones, you’ll see a different link in the #general channel on Pumble . Let’s see if this talk has managed to sway some opinions!”

how to end a good presentation

Lastly, our final speaker might refer back to a humorous statement he made about chaining one’s employees to their desks to ensure that employee retention rates stay high.

“Once you start making your company a better place to work, your employees will happily perform their daily tasks — without being glued to their desks.”

Tip #3: Elicit a response

Making an audience experience strong emotions is always a good thing, but especially as the presentation comes to a close.

Putting the listeners in a contemplative mood or, even better, a cheerful one, means that they’ll be more likely to remember you and the points you made after your presentation ends.

On top of that, concluding your presentation in this manner would allow you to step off the stage gracefully, which is one of the main goals your conclusion should accomplish.

Now, depending on the type of presentation you’re delivering and, indeed, your style of presenting, you could elicit a response by:

  • Ending with a short but powerful statement ,
  • Asking a thought-provoking rhetorical question ,
  • Relying on an impactful statistic or a quote , or even
  • Inserting a funny picture or a meme on your final presentation slide.

Any one of these methods could help you solidify yourself and your message in the minds of the audience.

Phrases you can use to elicit a response from the audience

So, how would our 3 presenters try to get a response from their audiences? Well, they might use the following statements.

“Ultimately, the best defense against phishing attacks is human intelligence. You, alone, can ensure that your information remains secure by implementing the checklist I’ve shared today.”
“So, let me ask you again. Would you be willing to incorporate AI into your marketing campaign?”
“Hey, if the conditions you’re offering to your employees are good enough — there’s no need to keep them glued to their desks.”

how to end a good presentation

Tip #4: Engage the audience

As we’ll discuss later on, having a Q&A session at the end of your presentation doesn’t always pan out the way you want it to.

Even so, getting your audience — or at least a few select listeners — to verbally respond to you can go a long way toward making you seem like a more engaging speaker.

Still, you can’t implement this tip without a strategy. You want to lead your audience to a certain type of response .

Professional speaker, career change consultant, and host of the Career Relaunch® podcast, Joseph Liu , had this to say:

Joseph Liu

“I often invite attendees to share what action they’re going to take amongst the potential ones I’ve covered throughout the presentation or to at least commit to taking some sort of action.”

Speaker, author, and editorial producer at CNN, Nadia Bilchik , agrees:

Nadia Bilchik

“If time allows, I always ask participants to share their biggest takeaway.”

The quote above also highlights the importance of being aware of the time as you are concluding a presentation — which is another thing we’ll talk about later.

For now, we’ll just boil this tip down to the following statement: if possible, try to make people verbalize or at least think about the knowledge they’re taking away from your speech .

Phrases you can use to engage the audience

Going back to our imaginary speakers, let’s see how this tip might work in practice.

“As we approach my conclusion, I’d like for us to reflect on everything we’ve learned here today. So, let me turn the spotlight on you all. Does anyone remember how to recognize a phishing email without opening it?”
“Now, I’m sure everyone here has some idea of how they might incorporate AI into their next marketing campaign. Is anyone willing to share their strategy?”
“Alright! Pop quiz time — don’t worry, I won’t grade you. Can you all shout out the main 3 ways to increase employee retention? Number 1?”

Tip #5: Call to action

Once you have finished reiterating your core message and making sure you have your audience’s attention, you need to be able to direct the listeners to the next step.

As Michelle Gladieux , author of Communicate with Courage and President of Gladieux Consulting, an employee coaching provider, would put it:

Michelle Gladieux

“What can the audience DO with the information you’ve shared? Suggest a positive, fruitful next step or, even better, suggest several, and let your presentation participants choose among options that have panned out well for others.”

In her workshops, Gladieux says:

“We ask participants to document at least one goal for behavior change that is specific, measurable, and time-based, and take a bonus step of inviting them to name one person they’ll tell about their goal for added accountability.”

According to the authors of Communicating at Work , there are 2 ways to deliver a call to action at the end of your presentation. Namely, you can either phrase it as:

  • An appeal or a question (e.g. “If any of this sounds interesting, you can learn more by signing up for our newsletter through the link on the screen behind me.” ), or
  • A challenge or a demand (e.g. “Now, you can keep doing what you’re doing and getting lackluster results. Or, you can sign up for our newsletter to receive tips that will help you upgrade your strategy.” ).

As always, your choice will depend on the factors we have listed at the top of this article.

Phrases you can use to call the audience to action

Let’s see what our fictional speakers’ calls to action might look like.

“Remember, even if you happen to open a phishing email, you’ll be able to deal with it easily by forwarding it to this email address. That’s the main thing you need to remember from this talk.”
“I bet many of you could come up with even more creative ways to incorporate AI into your marketing campaigns. So, how about this: if you fill out the form I’m about to send you, I’ll check in with you in about three months. Those of you who succeed in using AI in a meaningful way will get a chance to share your insights on this very stage next year!”
“I have a challenge for those of you who are ready to meet me at my level. I want you to sign a pledge, promising to boost your employee retention rate by 10% in the next year. We had a similar experiment at one of my talks a couple of years back, and even I was surprised by the results.”

If you decide to accompany this part of your speech with a call to action slide, keep Juliet Huck’s advice in mind:

“A call to action slide is not always persuasive. Persuasion is not a call to action — it is a directed action. To ‘call’ means someone can say no, but to ‘persuade’ [is to] direct your audience to your desired conclusion based on a number of steps.”

In effect, that means that your call to action should be the final step of your persuasion strategy.

You should start building to that desired outcome well before you get to the end of your presentation.

Tip #6: Hand out materials

The ending of a presentation is the perfect time to give the audience a keepsake of your speech .

But, keep in mind that a memento doesn’t have to be a physical item. As Michelle Gladieux would say:

“I like to direct my audiences to free downloadable resources on our website for those who want to continue their personal and professional growth as leaders and communicators.”

So, sharing resources through email or a business messaging app would work just as well.

Of course, you don’t have to hold off until the conclusion of your presentation to give your audience something to remember you by. Gladieux also shared a method she used in her workshops: 

“[Most of our] participants have our high-quality original workbooks in hand during the presentation and available later as a tangible resource. Folks add notes, take short assessments, and work on case studies when we teach using workbooks. If we use presentation slides, we keep the content as engaging visually as possible and short on words.”

If your budget allows you to do something similar, that might be a good way to make the audience remember you.

Phrases you can use before handing out materials

In the scenarios we have conjured up, the speakers might introduce their additional materials like so.

“If you’re interested in learning more about phishing and how you can defend yourself from future attacks, you’ll find more information by following the link on the screen.”
“Now, at this point, I see that my associates have already started delivering some additional materials and miscellaneous goodies to you. I hope you’ll use them to workshop further ideas for using AI in your marketing strategies.”
“I’ll go ahead and forward these presentation slides as well as some additional resources for improving employee retention to you all.”

The third speaker uses the team communication app, Pumble, to share additional resources

If you’re looking for a convenient way to deliver additional resources to the attendees of your speech, Pumble is a great option. This article offers some practical tips for using business messaging software for educational purposes — including online conferences:

  • Using Pumble for teaching and learning  

Tip #7: Acknowledge contributors

If you’re delivering a business presentation as a representative of a team or a department, you can also use the final moments of your speech to acknowledge everyone who worked on the presentation with you.

On the one hand, you could simply thank your team in general terms and leave it at that.

Alternatively, you could highlight the individual contributions of specific team members if you want to make sure their effort doesn’t go unnoticed.

Phrases you can use to acknowledge your contributors

Here’s how our fictitious presenters might acknowledge the people who helped them create their presentations:

“Before I sign off, I’d like to take a moment to thank Jill and Vanessa from the security team, who helped me compile the data and create the slides you just saw.”
“Finally, I’d like to acknowledge that this presentation wouldn’t be half as informative without the experts who helped me understand the technical side of AI.”
“Now, let’s all give it up for my wonderful team, who helped me organize this lecture.”

Improve communication and collaboration for increased team efficiency with Pumble.

Tip #8: Provide contact information

Business presentations often double as networking opportunities , both for presenters and for audience members.

With that in mind, you might want to put your contact information on one of your closing slides.

For one, doing so would show the audience how they can get in touch with you after your presentation ends. After all, they may have additional questions or even interesting business opportunities for you.

On top of that, putting your contact information on the last slide is also a good way to remind the audience of your name and credentials .

For that reason, our second imaginary speaker might have “Joan Miller — Chief Marketing Officer at Happy Media” on her final slide.

Phrases you can use to provide contact information

So, how would our presenters encourage their audience to keep in touch? Well, they might say: 

“I’m always happy to answer any of your security or phishing-related questions on Pumble. You’ll find me by clicking the plus sign next to the direct messages section and searching my name, Nick Mulder.”
“If you all have any follow-up questions for me or one of the AI experts I’ve spoken to, you’ll find all of our contact information on this slide.”
“If you want to stay up to date on Green & Co’s latest news, follow us on LinkedIn.”

The first speaker asked his coworkers to contact him through direct messages on the business communication app, Pumble 

Tip #9: Thank the audience

Many presenters find a way to incorporate a “ thank you ” slide at the end of their presentations.

If you want to express your appreciation to your audience members , you could do the same thing.

However, as we’ll soon discuss, many of the experts we’ve spoken to would advise against having pointless visuals at the end of your presentation.

After all, you want to leave the audience with something memorable to take away from your speech.

Still, if you want to thank the audience, you could always make that final slide serve multiple functions .

For example, a “thank you” slide can also contain the speaker’s contact information, as well as additional resources.

how to end a good presentation

Tip #10: Ask for feedback

Lastly, some speakers might benefit from knowing what the audience thinks about their delivery and other aspects of their presentation.

That’s why some of the experts we’ve spoken to suggest that conducting a brief survey of the audience could be a good activity to end a presentation with.

Rutgers University professor, Mark Beal, says that:

“Offering audience members the opportunity to take a concise survey at the conclusion of a presentation will result in valuable insights that will inform how to consistently evolve and improve a presentation. […] We use the last few minutes of seminars to allow participants to answer a few questions about what was most useful in our content and delivery, and what, in that individual’s opinion, could improve.”

Michelle Gladieux is also an advocate for audience surveys, saying:

“I’ve delivered thousands of training workshops and keynotes and never miss an opportunity to ask for feedback formally (in writing), informally (in conversation), or both. As you might guess, I advise every presenter reading this to do the same.”

You could encourage this type of feedback by:

  • Asking attendees to share their thoughts on your presentation after you step off the stage,
  • Setting up a notebook near the door and asking people to jot down their thoughts as they exit,
  • Having a suggestion box for hand-written feedback notes, or
  • Creating an anonymous survey online and linking to it on your presentation slides.

Most presenters nowadays tend to rely on technology to compile audience feedback, but the method you use will depend on the circumstances surrounding your presentation.

If you’ve never had to ask for feedback before, you might find this article interesting:

  • How to ask your manager for feedback  

The worst ways to end a presentation

Having gone through the best practices for concluding a presentation memorably, we also wanted to know what are some of the mistakes speakers should avoid as they reach the end of their speech.

The experts we have spoken to have identified 5 of the worst ways to end a presentation :

  • Overloading your final slide.
  • Settling for a lackluster closer.
  • Ending with a Q&A session.
  • Not having time for any questions at all.
  • Going over your time.

So, let’s see what makes these mistakes so bad.

Mistake #1: Overloading your final slide

Overloading your presentation slides isn’t a mistake you can make only at the end of your presentation.

Professional speakers know that slides are only there to accompany your speech — they shouldn’t be the main event.

As Nadia Bilchik says:

Nadia Bilchik

“Slides are only there to support your message. Towards the end of the presentation, I may even stop the slideshow entirely and just have a black screen. At the very end of the presentation, my suggestion is to have a slide up with the next steps or a call to action.”

Dr. Lee M. Pierce also tends to use blank slides:

Dr. Lee M. Pierce

“I always end and begin with blank slides. As a speaker, you’re trying to build connection and rapport between you and the audience, not between the audience and your slide deck.”

Therefore, putting too much information onto a single slide can make the speaker seem unprepared, in addition to overwhelming the audience.

When in doubt, remember Kawasaki’s 10/20/30 rule :

  • No more than 10 slides per presentation,
  • Keep your presentations under 20 minutes, and
  • The text on your slides should never be smaller than 30-point font. 

Mistake #2: Settling for a lackluster closer

If your goal is to become a proficient speaker, you’ll have to stop using uninspired closers like:

  • “Well, I guess that’s it.”
  • “That’s pretty much all I had to say.”
  • “That’s about it from me. Can we get some applause?”

The audience will respond if you say something deserving of a response.

Instead of using these bland lines, remember Juliet Huck’s advice:

“Never end your presentation without closing the loop of your beginning theme and being specific when asking for your desire conclusion.”

As we have established, it’s best to conclude your speech by bringing back your thesis statement and key points.

Finishing with weak visuals is similarly offensive — and here we’re not just talking about presentation slides.

Remember, body language is an important component of our communication .

Fidgeting as your presentation comes to a close or slumping your posture as soon as you’re finished speaking won’t do.

As Michelle Gladieux would say:

“Never end a presentation seeming happy to be done, even if you are! Be certain you’re happy to be the presenter before you begin, or find someone else to do it.”

In other words, try not to show signs of anxiety during your presentation .

Maintain a confident demeanor for as long as you remain on stage or as long as you’re on camera, in the case of virtual meetings .

Mistake #3: Ending with a Q&A session

One of the experts we have spoken to, Nadia Bilchik, was particularly adamant about not ending presentations with Q&A sessions.

“Never ever end a presentation on a question-and-answer session. I have seen numerous presenters end by asking ‘Any questions?’ Too often there are no questions, and the presenter is left looking deflated and muttering ‘Thank you.’ [If there are] no questions, you can always say ‘A question I’m often asked is…’ or ‘Something I would like to reiterate is…’ Never end your presentation without your audience being clear about what they are expected to do with the information you have just shared.”

Adding that you can:

“Ask for questions, comments, and concerns, and only then end with a quick wrap-up. The goal is to end with your audience being clear on their next steps.”

Even if the listeners do have questions, there’s a good reason not to have a Q&A session at the very end of your presentation.

Namely, there’s always a chance that someone will ask a question that completely derails the conversation.

If you have the Q&A portion right before your conclusion, you’ll have time to reiterate your core message and proceed with a memorable closing statement .

For reference, you can ask for questions by saying:

“Before I close out this lecture, do you guys have any questions for me?”

Then, if there are no questions, you can still proceed to your conclusion without losing face. 

A Q&A session is one of the best ways to make your presentations more interactive — but it’s not the only way to go about it. To learn more, check out this article:

  • 18 Ways to make presentations more interactive and engaging

Mistake #4: Not having time for any questions at all

Ending with a Q&A session could be a problem — but, perhaps, not as big of a problem as not taking questions at all.

As Mark Beal would say:

“Not giving the audience the opportunity to participate in the presentation via a question and answer session is another ineffective way to end a presentation. Audiences want to have a voice in a presentation. They will be more engaged with the presentation content and recall it more effectively if given the opportunity to participate in the presentation and interact with the presenter.”

Dr. Lee M. Pierce adds:

“It’s always good to leave at least 15 minutes for questions. Leaving 5 minutes is annoying and pointless. Also, be prepared that the audience may not have questions or not feel comfortable just jumping in, so have some of your own questions ready to offer them. You can say something like, ‘Just to put it out there, if I were going to ask me a question, I’d ask…’ ”

Now, both Nadia Bilchik and Lee M. Pierce have mentioned phrases you can use if no one comes forth with a question.

You’ll notice that the sentences they have come up with will require you to consider the questions you may be asked ahead of time .

In addition to helping you create a better presentation, doing this will also allow you to answer any questions effortlessly.

Mistake #5: Going over your time

Last but not least, many of the professional speakers we have interviewed have stressed the importance of ending one’s presentation on time.

Michelle Gladieux said it best:

“The best way to end a presentation is ON TIME. Respect others’ time commitments by not running over. You can always hang around for a while to speak with people who have more to say or more to ask.”

Dr. Lee M. Pierce agrees:

“The worst thing you can do is run over time. If you were given 45 minutes for a presentation plus 15 minutes for Q & A, you should end at 45 minutes — better if you end at 35 or 40.”

Then again, according to Guy Kawasaki’s 10/20/30 rule, even going over the 20-minute mark could risk boring and alienating one’s audience.

Useful phrases for ending a presentation

In the course of our research, we’ve found many practical phrases one might use to wrap up a presentation.

We even had experts send in their suggestions. For example, Nadia Bilchik says:

“I always end with a very quick summary of the content, a definitive call to action, and a reiteration of the benefits to the audience. This is a superb model, and I have shared it with thousands of individuals who have found it immensely valuable. Use this as your framework: What I have looked at today… What I am asking you to do… The benefits are…”

Other phrases you might use at the end of your presentation include:

“To recap, we’ve discussed…”

“Throughout this presentation, we talked about…”

“In other words,…”

“To wrap up/conclude,…”

“In short, I’d like to highlight…”

“To put it simply,…”

“In conclusion…”

“In summary, the goal of my presentation…”

“If there’s one thing you take away from my presentation…”

“In bringing my presentation to a close, I wanted to…”

If you’d like to incorporate a call to action, you might say:

“I’m counting on you to…”

“After this presentation, I’d like to ask you to…”

“Please take a minute to…”

“Next time you (see a suspicious email), remember to (forward it to this email address).”

To end with a quote, you could say:

“Let me leave you with this quote…”

“That reminds me of the old saying…”

Lastly, more useful phrases include:

“Feel free to reach out if you have any questions.”

“For more information, head to the link on the screen.”

“Thank you for your time/attention.”

“I hope you found this presentation informative/useful/insightful.”

Remember: the last words you say should make it abundantly clear that your presentation has ended.

What should your final slide look like?

If you don’t want to leave your final slide blank as some of the experts we have talked to would recommend, there are other ways to fill that space.

Joseph Liu told us:

“I tend to make it very clear the presentation is coming to an end by having a slide that says, ‘Closing Thoughts’ or something to that effect. I recommend ending with a recap of your content, reconnecting with the initial hook you used at the start, and finally, some sort of call to action.”

Mark Beal has a similar formula for his closing slides, saying:

“The final slides of my presentation include: A slide featuring three key messages/takeaways, A question and answer slide to engage the audience at the conclusion in the same manner a presenter wants to engage an audience at the start of a presentation, and A final slide including the presenter’s contact information and a website address where they can learn more information. This slide can include a QR code that the audience can screenshot and access the presenter’s website or another digital destination.”

Between these two suggestions and the many examples we have included throughout our guide, you ought to have a clear picture of what your final slide might look like.

End your presentations with a bang on Pumble

Knowing how to end a presentation effectively is a skill like any other — you’re bound to get better through practice and repetition.

To get the most out of your presentations, make sure to give them on Pumble.

Pumble — a team communication and collaboration app — allows you to have the most interactive, efficient presentations thanks to:

  • The video conferencing feature that allows you to share your knowledge with a large group of people,
  • The screen sharing feature that allows you share your presentation,
  • The in-call message feature, to ensure your audience can participate (and send questions for the FAQ partition of the presentation, for example), and
  • The blur background feature, that ensures your audience’s attention is always on you and you alone.

Secure, real-time communication for professionals.

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Olga Milicevic is a communication researcher and author dedicated to making your professional life a bit easier. She believes that everyone should have the tools necessary to respond to their coworkers’ requests and communicate their own professional needs clearly and kindly.

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How to end a presentation in english: methods and examples.

  • By Matthew Jones

how to end a good presentation

Naturally, the way you end a presentation will depend on the setting and subject matter. Are you pitching an idea to your boss? Are you participating in a group presentation at school? Or are you presenting a business idea to potential investors? No matter the context, you’ll want to have a stellar ending that satisfies your audience and reinforces your goals.

So, do you want to learn how to end a presentation with style? Wondering how to end an informative speech? Or do you want to know how to conclude a Powerpoint presentation with impact? We’re here to help you learn how to end a presentation and make a great impression!

How to End a Presentation: 3 Effective Methods

Every presentation needs a great beginning, middle, and end. In this guide, we will focus on crafting the perfect conclusion. However, if you’d like to make sure that your presentation sounds good from start to finish, you should also check out our guide on starting a presentation in English .

Though there are many ways to end a presentation, the most effective strategies focus on making a lasting impression on your audience and reinforcing your goals. So, let’s take a look at three effective ways to end a presentation:

1. Summarize the Key Takeaways

Most presenters either make an argument (i.e. they want to convince their audience to adopt their view) or present new or interesting information (i.e. they want to educate their audience). In either case, the presentation will likely consist of important facts and figures. The conclusion gives you the opportunity to reiterate the most important information to your audience.

This doesn’t mean that you should simply restate everything from your presentation a second time. Instead, you should identify the most important parts of your presentation and briefly summarize them.

This is similar to what you might find in the last paragraph of an academic essay. For example, if you’re presenting a business proposal to potential investors, you might conclude with a summary of your business and the reasons why your audience should invest in your idea.

2. End with a CTA (Call-To-Action)

Ending with a Call-To-Action is one of the best ways to increase audience engagement (participation) with your presentation. A CTA is simply a request or invitation to perform a specific action. This technique is frequently used in sales or marketing presentations, though it can be used in many different situations.

For example, let’s say that you’re giving an informational presentation about the importance of hygiene in the workplace. Since your goal is to educate your audience, you may think that there’s no place for a CTA.

On the contrary, informational presentations are perfect for CTA’s. Rather than simply ending your presentation, you can direct your audience to seek out more information on the subject from authorities. In this case, you might encourage listeners to learn more from an authoritative medical organization, like the World Health Organization (WHO).

3. Use a Relevant Quote

It may sound cliche, but using quotes in your closing speech is both memorable and effective. However, not just any quote will do. You should always make sure that your quote is relevant to the topic. If you’re making an argument, you might want to include a quote that either directly or indirectly reinforces your main point.

Let’s say that you’re conducting a presentation about your company’s mission statement. You might present the information with a Powerpoint presentation, in which case your last slide could include an inspirational quote. The quote can either refer to the mission statement or somehow reinforce the ideas covered in the presentation.

Formatting Your Conclusion

While these 3 strategies should give you some inspiration, they won’t help you format your conclusion. You might know that you want to end your presentation with a Call-To-Action, but how should you “start” your conclusion? How long should you make your conclusion? Finally, what are some good phrases to use for ending a presentation?<br>

Examples of a Good Conclusion

In conclusion, I believe that we can increase our annual revenue this year. We can do this with a combination of increased efficiency in our production process and a more dynamic approach to lead generation. If we implement these changes, I estimate that annual revenue will increase by as much as 15%.

The example above shows a good conclusion for a business presentation. However, some people believe that the term in conclusion is overused. Here’s how to end a presentation using transition words similar to in conclusion .

Transition words help your audience know that your presentation is ending. Try starting your conclusion with one of these phrases:

  • To summarize

However, transition words aren’t always necessary. Here are a few good ways to end a presentation using a different approach.

  • Summarize Key Takeaways : There are two things that I’d like you to remember from today’s presentation. First, we are a company that consults startups for a fraction of the cost of other consultation services. And second, we have a perfect record of successfully growing startups in a wide variety of industries. If anything was unclear, I’d be happy to open the floor to questions.
  • Make a Call-To-Action : I am very passionate about climate change. The future of the planet rests on our shoulders and we are quickly running out of time to take action. That said, I do believe that we can effect real change for future generations. I challenge you to take up the fight for our children and our children’s children.
  • Use a Relevant Quote: I’d like to end my presentation with one of my favorite quotes: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.”

As you can see, your conclusion does not need to be very long. In fact, a conclusion should be short and to the point. This way, you can effectively end your presentation without rambling or adding extraneous (irrelevant) information.

How to End a Presentation in English with Common Phrases

Finally, there are a few generic phrases that people frequently use to wrap up presentations. While we encourage you to think about how to end a presentation using a unique final statement, there’s nothing wrong with using these common closing phrases:

  • Thank you for your time.
  • I appreciate the opportunity to speak with you today.
  • I’ll now answer any questions you have about (topic).
  • If you need any further information, feel free to contact me at (contact information).

We hope this guide helps you better understand how to end a presentation ! If you’d like to find out more about how to end a presentation in English effectively, visit Magoosh Speaking today!

Matthew Jones

Matthew Jones

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How to End a Presentation? [Top 8 Strategies with Examples]

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Guru - May 9, 2023 - Leave your thoughts. 9 min read

animaker deck , presentation , presentation ideas , Presentation Software , presentation tips

How you end a presentation is just as crucial as its opening. It can make or break the impression that you leave on your audience.

A strong conclusion can reinforce your key message and ensure that your audience remembers it even after the presentation is over.

A well-concluded presentation can leave your audience impressed, energized, and motivated to take action.

So now, are you wondering what’s the best way to conclude your presentation? Don’t worry! You have come to the right place!

To help you make a powerful ending to your presentation, we have compiled a list of 8 different strategies in this blog post.

Each of these strategies is designed to help you create a memorable and impactful conclusion to your presentation.

By choosing the most appropriate one for your presentation, you can ensure that your audience remembers your key message and feels motivated to take action.

Let’s jump right in,

1. Emphasize the core message 2. Mirror your opening statement 3. Pose an open-ended question 4. End with a Call to action 5. Thank the audience 6. End with a powerful quote 7. Acknowledge your contributors 8. Ask for feedback

1. Emphasize the core message:

One of the most important aspects of any presentation is ensuring your audience understands your core message.

Reiterating your main points and summarizing your message at the end of your presentation can reinforce this and leave a lasting impression.

It helps to ensure that your audience understands the purpose of your presentation and has a clear takeaway from the information you have provided.

In this video, the speaker restates her topic to conclude her speech firmly and gives a pause, resulting in tremendous applause from the audience.

Similarly, by restating your core message, you can also create a sense of cohesion and give your presentation a firm closure.

This can be particularly important if you want to motivate your audience to take action or influence their behavior in some way.

However, it's important not to repeat EVERYTHING you have said. Instead, focus on the most crucial elements and highlight them in a concise and clear manner.

2. Mirror your opening statement:

A great way to end your presentation is by mirroring your opening statement in your conclusion.

Highlighting your presentation's key message at the end and emphasizing the central idea you aimed to communicate will help your audience to retain it in their memory.

During the conclusion of the presentation, the speaker effectively utilized the technique of mirroring the opening example she had presented - ordering a pizza on the phone by herself.

The speaker demonstrated the remarkable transformation she had undergone in terms of personal growth and confidence, which strongly reinforced her message to the audience.

By mirroring her opening example, she created a sense of familiarity and connection with her audience while simultaneously driving home the key message of her presentation.

This technique allowed the audience to understand better and relate to the speaker's personal journey and the message she was conveying.

Similarly, you can also use this strategy to conclude your presentation. This can be particularly effective if you are trying to reinforce a specific theme or idea throughout your presentation.

3. Pose an open-ended question:

One of the best ways to conclude your presentation is to elicit a response from your audience using an open-ended question that can effectively engage them and make your presentation more memorable.

Look at how the speaker concludes her speech with an open-ended question in this video.

Similarly, you can also raise open-ended questions to help your audience look from a different perspective and encourage them to investigate more thoroughly on the information presented.

Most importantly, ensuring that your question is relevant to your presentation and doesn't detract from your overall message is essential when eliciting a response.

So make sure that you kindle your audiences’ thoughts and ideas with the open-ended question at the end. This helps create a good long-lasting impression of your presentation.

4. End with a Call to action:

One of the best ways to end your presentation is by concluding with a call to action slide.

Incorporating a call to action into your presentation can be a powerful way to encourage your audience to take the next step.

Whether it's signing up for a program, making a purchase, or supporting a cause, a clear call to action is essential to achieving your desired outcome.

Similarly, according to your type of presentation, you can include a relevant call to action.

For example, this might involve providing specific instructions or offering an incentive for taking action, such as a discount or free trial.

It's essential that you understand their pain points and make your call to action compelling. Ensure that your core message and the needs of your audience are aligned so that they are motivated enough to act.

5. Thank the audience:

At the end of your presentation, it's essential to recognize that your audience has taken time out of their busy schedules to attend and listen to your message.

Thanking your audience for their time and attention can create a positive impression and make them feel appreciated.

It's essential to make your gratitude genuine and sincere rather than a superficial gesture. For example, consider expressing your gratitude with a personal anecdote or acknowledging specific individuals in the audience.

This simple act of gratitude can also create a sense of personal connection and signal to your audience that the presentation has reached its conclusion, paving the way for future interactions with them.

6. End with a powerful quote:

One effective strategy to end your presentation on a high note is by leaving the audience with a powerful quote.

However, it's crucial to choose a quote that is not only impactful but also unique and relevant to your topic.

Using a commonly known quote may come across as unoriginal and irrelevant, losing the attention and interest of your audience in most cases.

In this presentation, Steve Jobs concludes his speech with an inspiring and powerful message, “Stay Hungry! Stay Foolish”. Thereby emphasizing that you should never stop learning, pursue more goals, and never stop being satisfied.

Similarly, in your conclusion, consider using a relevant quote to make an impact.

7. Acknowledge your contributors:

Another best way to conclude your presentation is by showing gratitude to your contributors.

For example, if you deliver a business presentation on behalf of a team or a department, it's essential to recognize the collective effort that went into creating the presentation.

The concluding moments of your speech are the perfect opportunity to acknowledge your team members' hard work and dedication.

You can express gratitude to your team as a whole, thanking them for their contribution to the presentation.

However, if you want to ensure that the individual efforts of team members are recognized, highlighting specific contributions may be a better approach.

Some examples include:

"Join me in giving a round of applause to my incredible team, who played a significant role in arranging this pitch deck."

"Finally, I would like to mention that my tech team experts provided me with insight into the technical nuances, and without their contribution, this presentation would not have been as informative as it is now."

"As I conclude, I want to express my gratitude to Mark and Serene from the Marketing team, whose assistance in gathering the data and designing the slides was invaluable."

By acknowledging individual team members, you are demonstrating your appreciation for their work and giving them the recognition they deserve.

This will not only make them feel valued but also motivate them to continue contributing to the success of future presentations.

So be sure to end your presentation with the required acknowledgment for all the contributions.

8. Ask for feedback:

You can conclude your presentation seamlessly by thanking the audience and asking for feedback from them.

Encouraging feedback from your audience can greatly benefit your future presentations. It allows you to understand how your message was received and how you can improve for the next time.

So, how can you gather feedback effectively?

Firstly, ask attendees to share their thoughts on your presentation after you finish speaking. This can be done by initiating a Q&A session or by approaching individuals directly.

Another option is to set up a QR code near the exit and ask people to scan and jot down their thoughts on the online form as they leave. This allows attendees to provide their feedback in a confidential and hassle-free manner.

Also, consider having a suggestion box for handwritten feedback notes or creating an anonymous online survey that links to your presentation slides. This method is beneficial if you want to gather feedback from a large audience or if you prefer to have quantitative data.

By actively seeking feedback, you show your audience that you value their input and are committed to improving your presentation skills.

However, this strategy does not apply to all the general presentations. So use this way of concluding your presentation where it makes more sense to you and the audience.

In summary, an impactful conclusion is vital to wrap up your presentation successfully.

Each of these strategies serves a unique purpose, and by combining them, you can create a conclusion that is both engaging and impactful.

By incorporating the 8 critical strategies mentioned in this guide, you can leave a lasting impression on your audience, ensuring that your message stays with them even after the presentation has ended.

Now that you have learned the pro strategies of how to end a presentation, take a look at this guide on “How to start a presentation” as well and nail your presentation from start to end!

If you are still uncertain about how to make a presentation from the ground up, we suggest checking out Animaker Deck - the world's first avatar-driven presentation software.

With over 40 distinct and creatively designed templates at your disposal, we are confident you will find it worth trying!

We hope this article was helpful. Do let us know your thoughts on which strategy worked best for you, and also suggest your own ways of ending a presentation.

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How to Close Your Presentation in English Powerfully [+ FREE Presentation Checklist]

May 9, 2018 | Business Professional English , Free Resource , Public Speaking & Presentations

What to Include in the Conclusion of Your Presentation in English

This lesson has been updated from its original posting in 2016.

You’re giving your presentation in English. You have just two minutes left. And it’s time for the conclusion …

Did you know most people only remember the first and last things you tell them? It’s true.

If you are giving a presentation in English, then you definitely want people to remember what you say at the end. And this means your closing must be powerful!

You’ve worked hard on your presentation. You searched for information online. You couldn’t sleep at night. You felt nervous about making mistakes. You spent hours preparing. You reviewed the grammar and vocabulary. You worried about someone asking a question. You practiced and practiced and practiced.

And now it’s the last two minutes. This is the last opportunity for your audience to hear your key points. It is the last chance you have to help your audience remember your comments.

A closing in a presentation should be short and clear. It should summarize your key points. And, most importantly, it should be powerful.

In today’s lesson, you’re going to learn about 3 ways to make your closing more powerful. Plus you’ll learn useful key expressions you can use in your presentation.

3 steps to a powerful closing in your presentation.

Lesson by Annemarie

3 Strategies to Close Your Presentation Powerfully

Use these 3 strategies in your conclusion to:

  • recapture your audience’s attention
  • get your audience to focus and remember your key points
  • help your audience connect with you and your topic
  • end your presentation powerfully

One: Include a Call to Action (CTA)

Is there something you want your audience to do or think after your presentation. Do you want them to take action? Tell your audience exactly what you want them to do with a Call to Action.

Here’s my example:

“ After you finish today’s lesson, please take 2 minutes to  leave a comment about your experience with presentations. You can share your thoughts or ask questions in the comments section at the bottom of this lesson – it’s the perfect place to join a discussion on this topic.”

A couple useful expressions to help you introduce your CTA is:

  • To close, I’d like to ask you to do this one thing…
  • And finally, before you leave the conference today, please take two minutes to…

Two: End with a Powerful/Inspirational Quote

Is there one thing you really want your audience to remember? Or is there a specific feeling you want your audience to have after your presentation?

Using a powerful quote can help you do that. You could introduce a great quote or interesting statistic with:

  • I’d like to finish with this powerful/interesting/wonderful/inspiring/ quote from …
  • And finally, let’s finish up today’s discussion with this surprising/useful/shocking/hopeful statistic …

Here are some example quotes that might help people be prepared to take action or to think differently. But remember! Always match the quote or statistic to your topic:

“In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”  – Martin Luther King, Jr. “Sometimes we stare so long at a door that is closing that we see too late the one that is open.”  – Alexander Graham Bell

Three: Add a Surprising Fact or Statistic

Is there something you’d love for your audience to think about after your presentation? Is there a statistic or fact that will help someone remember your key points?

A surprising fact can also help re-engage your audience, it will snap their attention back to you.

For example:

Did you know that the human brain’s capacity is limitless – that’s great new right? BUT … did you also know that a person is likely to remember only 25% of a presentation after 24 hours?

Uh oh. That is why it’s SO important to have a powerful ending! Remember: the key is to find a statistic or fact that connects directly to your topic.

Useful Language to Close Your Presentation

Summarize Your Key Points & Close Your Presentation

  • That brings us to the end of the presentation. I’d like to summarize by saying …
  • That concludes my presentation. However, I’d like to quickly summarize the main points or takeaways.
  • And on that final note, that concludes my presentation.
  • To quickly recap, I’d like you to remember these key points …
  • To summarize …
  • In conclusion …
  • I’d like to bring this presentation to a close with …
  • I’d like to close this talk with …
  • So, this concludes the focus of discussion today. To end, I’d like to highlight …
  • This concludes [name/title of the section] so let’s move on to the final comments.

Thank Your Audience

  • I sincerely appreciate your attention today/this evening/this morning.
  • And that brings us to the end. I’d like to thank you for your time and attention today.
  • Thank you so much for your interest and attention.
  • At this time, I’d like to have my colleague speak so I’ll finish up by saying thank you for your attention.
  • I can see that our time is just about up so to finish I’d like to say thank you.
  • I sincerely appreciate that I’ve had this opportunity to present to you.
  • If there is one thing I would like you to remember from today’s presentation it’s …

Take Questions

  • If anyone has any questions, I’d be happy to open up the discussion.
  • If anyone has any questions, please feel free to ask now and I’ll do my best to answer.
  • Would anyone like to ask any questions?
  • I would now be interested to hear from you with your thoughts or questions.
  • Now let’s move on to some Q&A. (Q&A = Questions and Answers)

Provide Next Steps or Contact Information

  • If you would like more information, here is a list of useful resources/websites.
  • If anyone who like more information or has questions, please feel free to contact me at: [include contact info]
  • Here is a list for further reading on this topic. (Include the list of books or websites.)

Get the complete Presentations in English Series:

Part 1: How to Prepare for Your Presentation in English

Part 2:  How to Start with a Great Introduction in Your Presentation

Part 3:  How to Organize Your Presentation in English

Part 4: How to End Your Presentation Powerfully

After you’ve watched the video and reviewed the lesson, I’d love to hear from you!

Tell me about the best presentation you ever heard. Who gave the presentation? And why do you remember it? Share what you remember in the comments section below.

And for the bonus question!! Have you given a presentation in English? What tips or advice would you like to share with others? You can add your advice in the comments section.

Thank you so much for joining me!

~ Annemarie

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#301: Vocabulary for English Conversation on Artificial Intelligence (AI)

#301: Vocabulary for English Conversation on Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a hot topic of conversation. My goal is for you to feel comfortable and confident in those conversations. In this lesson, you’ll get the vocabulary you need to do that.

#300: How to Talk About Achievements in English | Plus Your Good News

#300: How to Talk About Achievements in English | Plus Your Good News

Talking about your achievements demonstrates your value to your employer or interviewer. Sharing your good news and milestones with loved ones allows them to celebrate your successes with you. Here’s how to do all of that in English.

#299: Practical Steps to Be a Confident English Speaker [Myth vs. Reality]

#299: Practical Steps to Be a Confident English Speaker [Myth vs. Reality]

Tired of trying but not making progress? Don’t know why everything you’re doing now isn’t working? This will give you clarity + practical strategies to make progress — today.

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Great website. I found a typo in on the presentation closings page “Useful Langauge to Close Your Presentation”.

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hey Annemarie could you help me in ending my presentation on mental health. it is a school presentation for MUN

If you’d like editing help, please see our options for 1:1 classes .

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How to End a Presentation The Right Way (+ 3 Downloadable Creative PowerPoint Conclusion Slides)

Ausbert Generoso

Ausbert Generoso

How to End a Presentation The Right Way (+ 3 Downloadable Creative PowerPoint Conclusion Slides)

Ever been in a presentation that started strong but fizzled out at the end? It’s a common frustration. The conclusion is where your message either sticks or fades away.

But how often have you left a presentation wondering, “Was that it?” A lackluster ending can undermine the impact of an entire presentation. In the digital age, a strong conclusion isn’t just a courtesy; it’s your secret weapon to make your message unforgettable.

In this blog, we’re diving into the art of crafting a powerful ending, making sure your audience doesn’t just understand but gets inspired. Let’s explore the key on how to end a presentation in a way that lingers in your audience’s minds.

Table of Contents

Why having a good presentation conclusion matters.

how to end a good presentation

Understanding why a conclusion is not merely a formality but a critical component is key to elevating your presentation game. Let’s delve into the pivotal reasons why a well-crafted conclusion matters:

🎉 Lasting Impression

The conclusion is the last note your audience hears, leaving a lasting impression. It shapes their overall perception and ensures they vividly remember your key points.

🔄 Message Reinforcement

Think of the conclusion as the reinforcement stage for your central message. It’s the last opportunity to drive home your main ideas, ensuring they are understood and internalized.

📝 Audience Takeaways

Summarizing key points in the conclusion acts as a guide, ensuring your audience remembers the essential elements of your presentation.

💬 Connection and Engagement

A well-crafted conclusion fosters engagement, connecting with your audience on a deeper level through thought-provoking questions, compelling quotes, or visual recaps.

🚀 Motivation for Action

If your presentation includes a call to action, the conclusion plants the seeds for motivation, encouraging your audience to become active participants.

🌟 Professionalism and Polishing

A strong conclusion adds professionalism, showcasing attention to detail and a commitment to delivering a comprehensive and impactful message.

6 Unique Techniques and Components to a Strong Conclusion

As we navigate the art of how to end a presentation, it becomes evident that a powerful and memorable conclusion is not merely the culmination of your words—it’s an experience carefully crafted to resonate with your audience. In this section, we explore key components that transcend the ordinary, turning your conclusion into a compelling finale that lingers in the minds of your listeners.

unique techniques on how to end a presentation

1. Visual Storytelling through Imagery

What it is:  In the digital age, visuals carry immense power. Utilize compelling imagery in your conclusion to create a visual story that reinforces your main points. Whether it’s a metaphorical image, a powerful photograph, or an infographic summarizing key ideas, visuals can enhance the emotional impact of your conclusion.

How to do it:  Select images that align with your presentation theme and evoke the desired emotions. Integrate these visuals into your conclusion, allowing them to speak volumes. Ensure consistency in style and tone with the rest of your presentation, creating a seamless visual narrative that resonates with your audience.

2. Interactive Audience Participation

What it is:  Transform your conclusion into an interactive experience by engaging your audience directly. Pose a thought-provoking question or conduct a quick poll related to your presentation theme. This fosters active participation, making your conclusion more memorable and involving your audience on a deeper level.

How to do it:  Craft a question that encourages reflection and discussion. Use audience response tools, if available, to collect real-time feedback. Alternatively, encourage a show of hands or open the floor for brief comments. This direct engagement not only reinforces your message but also creates a dynamic and memorable conclusion.

3. Musical Closure for Emotional Impact

What it is:  Consider incorporating music into your conclusion to evoke emotions and enhance the overall impact. A carefully selected piece of music can complement your message, creating a powerful and memorable ending that resonates with your audience on a sensory level.

How to do it:  Choose a piece of music that aligns with the tone and message of your presentation. Introduce the music at the right moment in your conclusion, allowing it to play during the final thoughts. Ensure that the volume is appropriate and that the music enhances, rather than distracts from, your message.

4. Intentional and Deliberate Silence

What it is:  Sometimes, the most impactful way to conclude a presentation is through intentional silence. A brief pause after delivering your final words allows your audience to absorb and reflect on your message. This minimalist approach can create a sense of gravity and emphasis.

How to do it:  Plan a deliberate pause after your last sentence or key point. Use this moment to make eye contact with your audience, allowing your message to sink in. The strategic use of silence can be particularly effective when followed by a strong closing statement or visual element.

5. Narrative Bookending

What it is:  Create a sense of completeness by bookending your presentation. Reference a story, quote, or anecdote from the introduction, bringing your presentation full circle. This technique provides a satisfying narrative structure and reinforces your core message.

How to do it:  Identify a story or element from your introduction that aligns with your conclusion. Reintroduce it with a fresh perspective, revealing its relevance to the journey you’ve taken your audience on. This technique not only creates coherence but also leaves a lasting impression.

6. Incorporating Humor for Memorable Impact

What it is:  Humor can be a powerful tool in leaving a positive and memorable impression. Consider injecting a well-timed joke, light-hearted anecdote, or amusing visual element into your conclusion. Humor can create a sense of camaraderie and connection with your audience.

How to do it:  Choose humor that aligns with your audience’s sensibilities and the overall tone of your presentation. Ensure it enhances, rather than detracts from, your message. A genuine and well-placed moment of humor can humanize your presentation and make your conclusion more relatable.

[Bonus] Creative Ways on How to End a Presentation Like a Pro

1. minimalist conclusion table design.

One of the many ways to (aesthetically) end your PowerPoint presentation is by having a straightforward and neat-looking table to sum up all the important points you want your audience to reflect on. Putting closing information in one slide can get heavy, especially if there’s too much text included – as to why it’s important to go minimal on the visual side whenever you want to present a group of text.

PowerPoint conclusion slide table

Here’s how you can easily do it:

  • Insert a table. Depending on the number of points you want to reinforce, feel free to customize the number of rows & columns you might need. Then, proceed to fill the table with your content.
  • Clear the fill for the first column of the table by selecting the entire column. Then, go to the Table Design tab on your PowerPoint ribbon, click on the Shading drop down, and select No Fill.
  • Color the rest of the columns as preferred. Ideally, the heading column must be in a darker shade compared to the cells below.
  • Insert circles at the top left of each heading column. Each circle should be colored the same as the heading. Then, put a weighted outline and make it white, or the same color as the background.
  • Finally, put icons on top each circle that represent the columns. You may find free stock PowerPoint icons by going to Insert, then Icons.

2. Animated Closing Text

Ever considered closing a presentation with what seems to be a blank slide which will then be slowly filled with text in a rather captivating animation? Well, that’s sounds specific, yes! But, it’s time for you take this hack as your next go-to in ending your presentations!

Here’s how simple it is to do it:

  • Go to Pixabay , and set your search for only videos. In this example, I searched for the keyword, ‘yellow ink’.
  • Insert the downloaded video onto a blank PowerPoint slide. Then, go to the Playback tab on the PowerPoint ribbon. Set the video to start automatically, and tick the box for ‘Loop until stopped’. Then, cover it whole with a shape.
  • Place your closing text on top of the shape. It could be a quote, an excerpt, or just a message that you want to end your PowerPoint presentation with.
  • Select the shape, hold Shift, and select the text next. Then, go to Merge Shapes, and select Subtract.
  • Color the shape white with no outline. And, you’re done!

3. Animated 3D Models

What quicker way is there than using PowerPoint’s built-in 3D models? And did you know they have an entire collection of animated 3D models to save you time in setting up countless animations? Use it as part of your presentation conclusion and keep your audience’ eyes hooked onto the screens.

Here’s how you can do it:

  • Design a closing slide. In this example, I’m using a simple “Thank You” slide.
  • Go to Insert, then click on the 3D Models dropdown, and select Stock 3D Models. Here, you can browse thru the ‘All Animated Models’ pack and find the right model for you
  • Once your chosen model has been inserted, go to the Animations tab.
  • In this example, I’m setting a Swing animation. Then, set the model to start with previous.
  • For a final touch, go to Animation Pane. From the side panel, click on the Effect Options dropdown and tick the check box for Auto-reverse. Another would be the Timing dropdown, then select Until End of Slide down the Repeat dropdown.

Get a hold of these 3 bonus conclusion slides for free!

Expert Tips on How to End a Presentation With Impact

🔍  Clarity and Conciseness

Tip:  Keep your conclusion clear and concise. Avoid introducing new information, and instead, focus on summarizing key points and reinforcing your main message. A concise conclusion ensures that your audience retains the essential takeaways without feeling overwhelmed.

⏩  Maintain a Strong Pace

Tip:  Control the pacing of your conclusion. Maintain a steady rhythm to sustain audience engagement. Avoid rushing through key points or lingering too long on any single aspect. A well-paced conclusion keeps your audience focused and attentive until the very end.

🚀  Emphasize Key Takeaways

Tip:  Clearly highlight the most critical takeaways from your presentation. Reinforce these key points in your conclusion to emphasize their significance. This ensures that your audience leaves with a firm grasp of the essential messages you aimed to convey.

🔄  Align with Your Introduction

Tip:  Create a sense of cohesion by aligning your conclusion with elements introduced in the beginning. Reference a story, quote, or theme from your introduction, providing a satisfying narrative arc. This connection enhances the overall impact and resonance of your presentation.

🎭  Practice, but Embrace Flexibility

Tip:  Practice your conclusion to ensure a confident delivery. However, be prepared to adapt based on audience reactions or unexpected changes. Embrace flexibility to address any unforeseen circumstances while maintaining the overall integrity of your conclusion.

📢  End with a Strong Call to Action (if applicable)

Tip:  If your presentation includes a call to action, conclude with a compelling and actionable statement. Clearly communicate what you want your audience to do next and why. A strong call to action motivates your audience to take the desired steps.

🙏  Express Gratitude and Closure

Tip:  Express gratitude to your audience for their time and attention. Provide a sense of closure by summarizing the journey you’ve taken together. A gracious and thoughtful conclusion leaves a positive final impression.

Final Thoughts

In wrapping up your presentation, the conclusion serves as the final touch, leaving a strong and lasting impression. Think of it as the last puzzle piece that completes the picture. Ensure your conclusion goes beyond a simple summary, using visuals and engagement to make it memorable. Express gratitude sincerely as you bring your talk to an end, acknowledging the shared experience and setting the stage for what follows.

In these closing moments, aim for more than just a conclusion; create a connection that lingers in the minds of your audience.

About Ausbert Generoso

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Business | Storytelling

How to end your presentation with style.

how to end a good presentation

Written by Kai Xin Koh

How to end a presentation with style - saltbae

“I’ve come to the end of my presentation. Any questions?” you ask, hoping to hear a response from your audience. Unfortunately, you get nothing but an awkward silence.You think you pulled off a pretty great presentation, but then find yourself falling flat at the end. In this article, we endeavor to de-mystify how to end a presentation with style.

Let’s face the truth. Unless you present like Steve Jobs , the likelihood of an audience remembering your public speaking performance from start to end is extremely low. But this doesn’t mean that it is impossible to make a lasting impression. Studies have shown that when an audience is given a series of information, they have a tendency to remember the first and last items best. So use this to your advantage, and make an impact with your closing statement. Not only will you create a memorable moment, but your audience will also have an easier time retaining the message you’re trying to bring across.

We’ll show you 5 proven ways on how to end your presentation.

1. Inspire Your Audience with a Quote

Quotes are one of the most commonly used methods and with good reason. It has been a tried-and-tested way to reach out to your audience and connect with them on a deeper level. But here’s the thing: You need to figure out what resonates with them, and choose one that fits the presentation theme. If you’re up to it, you can round off the quote with your own thoughts as well.

For a great example, take a look at Sir Ken Robinson’s TED Talk, ‘How to escape education’s death valley’. When he was concluding his presentation, he used Benjamin Franklin’s quote:

There are three sorts of people in the world: Those who are immovable, people who don’t get it, or don’t want to do anything about it; there are people who are movable, people who see the need for change and are prepared to listen to it; and there are people who move, people who make things happen.

However, instead of ending it there, he then continued, “And if we can encourage more people, that will be a movement. And if the movement is strong enough, that’s, in the best sense of the word, a revolution. And that’s what we need.”

Not only did he use the quote to inspire the audience, he also added his own thoughts to provide perspective and illustrate his point further.

The quotes you share do not have to be from well-known authors. In fact, unusual quotes that have been rarely used can work in your favor by providing a different perspective. Just remember, it pays to exercise caution, as an inappropriate quote in the wrong situation may backfire instead.

2. End with a Compelling Image

We all know the saying, ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’. It’s pretty cliché, but true – Images do help to bring your message across in an impactful way. Ever heard of the ‘The Burning Monk’? In 1963, photographer Malcolm Browne captured a stunning photo of a monk who self-immolated in protest against the persecution of Buddhists. That award-winning photo sparked outrage around the world, and brought the situation into focus for many who were previously unaware of the situation.

how to end your presentation - burning man example

Image Credit: rarehistoricalphotos.com

If the news had been reported without this image, would it have the same impact? Unlikely. Of course, information can’t be shared without text, but ultimately, images are the ones that leave the biggest impression.

When you’re selecting an image to put on your final slide, ask yourself these questions to guide you along.

  • What do you want to show your audience?
  • What are you trying to illustrate?
  • How should they feel after looking at the image?

3. Leave With a Question

While it is not often encouraged to leave your audience hanging, suspense can be a fantastic way to create a memorable ending if you use it appropriately. Round off with a question that they can reflect on after the presentation, to keep them thinking about what you’ve shared. Keep it closely related to your topic, and use it to put the spotlight on a point you which to bring across.

Take a look at Scott Dinsmore’s TEDx talk, ‘How to find and do work you love’. In his presentation, he talked about discovering what matters to us, and then start doing it. For his conclusion, he ended by asking the audience, “What is the work you can’t not do?”

This ending can also useful if you know that you will be following up with a second presentation that will answer the question. Pose a thought-provoking question, then hint that you will be answering it in your next presentation, to give them something to look forward to.

4. Encourage Action

Sometimes, it’s great to be straightforward, and tell the audience what you’d like them to do. Would you like them to try doing something? Buy a product you’re selling? Commit to an event?

When you’re inviting the audience to act on something, be sure to make a clear statement. Ensure that your words are not vague or misleading, and bring your point across in a confident and firm manner.

Don’t make it tough for your audience to do an action. Who likes to leap through dozens of obstacles to get things done? Get your audience moving by starting slow. For example, if you’re presenting about environmental protection, don’t ask them to cut out all wastage immediately, that’s an impossible task. Instead, ask them to start by recycling whenever they can.

Alternatively, if you’re daring enough, make a bold statement. Share your belief in something, and involve the audience in it.

Not sure how you can do it? Watch Kakenya Ntaiya’s talk, ‘A girl who demanded school’. In her concluding statement, she passionately declared:

“I want to challenge you today. You are listening to me because you are here, very optimistic. You are somebody who is so passionate. You are somebody who wants to see a better world. You are somebody who wants to see that war ends, no poverty. You are somebody who wants to make a difference. You are somebody who wants to make our tomorrow better. I want to challenge you today that to be the first , because people will follow you. Be the first. People will follow you. Be bold. Stand up. Be fearless. Be confident. ”

5. Reiterate Your Message

You’ve spent a lot of time preparing the message you’re sharing, and now it’s time to reinforce it. To do that, summarize the key points of your presentation, and repeat them so that your audience remembers it once more.

A great technique to use when you’re repeating your message is the Rule of Three, a rule that suggests that people generally tend to remember concepts or ideas presented in threes better. Some commonly used examples would be ‘Reduce, Reuse, Recycle’ and ‘Mind, Body and Spirit’. Think of your presentation, and distil your key message into three words, phrases or sentences, before structuring your conclusion.

Neil Pasricha’s TEDx talk, ‘The 3 A’s of awesome’, is a fantastic example to learn from. In it, he talks about 3 secrets to lead an awesome life, i.e., Attitude, Awareness and Authenticity, which form the message for his entire presentation. But to further strengthen his message, he then repeats it at his conclusion by saying:

“And that’s why I believe that if you live your life with a great attitude , choosing to move forward and move on whenever life deals you a blow, living with a sense of awareness of the world around you, embracing your inner three year-old and seeing the tiny joys that make life so sweet and being authentic to yourself, being you and being cool with that, letting your heart lead you and putting yourself in experiences that satisfy you, then I think you’ll live a life that is rich and is satisfying, and I think you’ll live a life that is truly awesome.”

Sounds great, isn’t it? Not only did he reinforce his points, but he also captured his audience’s attention with a positive statement.

As presenters, we always hope that our presentations will end off on a high note. So now that you know how to end a presentation with style, take some time to prepare and practice, and you’re good to go. All the best!

Article Written By: Kai Xin Koh

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How to End Your Presentation with a Bang

how to end a good presentation

So you’ve spent days (maybe weeks) putting together a killer presentation. Now, you stand up with confidence, present every bullet point with poise, and then you get all the way to the end… and the presentation just fizzles.

It’s like a marathon runner who trains for months (maybe years), then just a half mile before the finish line, starts to cramps and can’t finish the race.

The last thing that you tell your audience will most likely be what they remember. So, you want to end your presentation with a bang!

In this post, we will cover three things that you should absolutely avoid when you close your presentation. In addition, we will also cover 6 killer ways to end on a positive note.

By the way, for more details about how to organize a good speech, see the following. 7 Foolproof Ways to Start a Presentation . | How to Design a Presentation Quickly .

Eliminate these “Show Stoppers” from Your Presentation Conclusion

Avoid these Presentation Ending Showstoppers

Avoid Ending Your Presentation with a Question & Answer Period.

One of the things that drives me up the wall is ending a fantastic presentation with a Q & A session that has a high propensity to just flop.

It reminds me of some sage advice from my jr high school football coach. He was an old-school running game type of coach. He’d say,

“In football, when you pass the ball, only three things can happen and two of them are bad.”

I kind of feel the same way about Question & Answer periods. There are only three ways that Q & A sessions can end, and two of them are bad .

Yes, If your audience asks you great questions, you can end your presentation on a high note. However, if your audience asks you odd questions or uninteresting questions, you can end on a low note. Even worse than getting crappy questions, though is getting no questions. Now, the ending will just seem odd.

When I present, I encourage people to ask questions DURING my presentation . That way, I can use a more dynamic way to end my presentation with a bang.

Don’t End by Thanking the Audience for Their Time.

When you stand up to speak, you should have the attitude that your audience is there to hear from you because you have important information that they need. When you thank your audience for their time, you are conceding that their time is more important than your time.

Also Avoid an Abrupt Ending with No Conclusion.

This happened to me early in my career. The first time that I really bombed a speech, I made two really big mistakes. The first was that I sped through the information so quickly that I finished in less than half of the allotted time. Then, I just ran out of things to say, so I sat down. The people in the audience were confused. I had more time and the ending was so abrupt, that they weren’t sure if I was finished.

So, spend time preparing your conclusion. Practice it a few times, and you will end on a high note.

Bonus Tip: Warn Your Audience Ahead of Time that Your Speech is Coming to a Close.

Our brains are wired to look for structure in things. That’s why people get frustrated with cliffhangers in movies. Only in movies, there’s a sequel. In speeches and presentations, the end is the end.

Give a hint that you are nearing a close a couple of slides or paragraphs before you actually do. Saying something like, “So let’s review what we’ve discussed so far”, “As I wrap up this presentation” or “In conclusion”.

Signaling the close prepares your audience for the ending. Ironically, it also makes the ending more memorable.

Secrets to a Powerful Presentation Ending – 6 Ways to End Your Presentation with a Bang

Not that we have covered what NOT to do, let’s focus on a few, turnkey ways to end your presentation with a bang.

(1) End Your Presentation with a Brief Summary You Key Points.

End Your Presentation with a Brief Summary You Key Points

This technique works really well because it allows you to repeat your key points a few times. This repetition helps your audience remember the content better.

An Example of Using a Summary to End Your Presentation with a Bang!

A couple of months ago, I had a class member that used this technique really well. She worked for a local TV station that was trying to attract new viewers. Here is the presentation outline that she created:

We Can Increase the Number of Young Viewers by Focusing More on Our Social Media Platforms Teens get most news from social media. Increase coverage w/ teens increases interest in station. Making social media selective will make us stand out against competition.

[Introduction] “My topic today is about how we can increase the number of young viewers by focusing more on social media. The things that we are going to cover are, how teens get most of their news from social media, that if we increase our coverage with teens there will also be a corresponding increase in interest in our TV station, and how making our social media selective will allow us to stand out from the competition.”

After the introduction, the speaker would then cover the “meat” of the presentation by going through each point with specific examples and evidence about how each of those points is true.

At the conclusion, the speaker could just recap by saying, “So in conclusion, since teens get most of their news via social media, if we increase our coverage with teens, we will also increase interest in our station, and if we make our social media selective we will stand out from the crowd, I believe that we can increase the number of young viewers by focusing more on social media.”

The summary technique is a very easy way to conclude your speech, and it will also increase the retention of your audience.

For additional examples, see How to Write a Speech in Just a few Steps .

(2) End with an Example, Story, or Anecdote.

End with a Story or Anecdote

I spoke for another 45 minutes, and then I finished the presentation by describing the success story of one of my class members. He had implemented the very content that I had just delivered to that breakout session group. However, he was delivering a very data-intense presentation for the Center for Disease Control. (So his content was even more boring than the type of content the audience had to deliver.) The story showed the group how a speaker can take even boring, data-filled material and deliver it well.

Those contrasting stories — the one at the start of my presentation, and the one at the end, work really well together. They bookend the entire presentation.

An Easy Way to Find a Funny Anecdote to End Your Presentation.

Sometimes a good anecdote or funny story can be a good way to end on a positive as well. A good place to get funny anecdotes is from Reader’s Digest . (RD has a great book published that has just funny work-related stories. You can purchase it here: Laughter the Best Medicine @ Work: America’s Funniest Jokes, Quotes, and Cartoons )

This is kind of an embarrassing incident, but it shows that if you get a little creative, any type of story can be a great ending.

I was training an instructor years ago, and I had her just pick a random funny anecdote from Reader’s Digest. I told her that, no matter what the story was about, I’d find some way to insert the funny story into our class. Here is the story that she picked…

A woman went to her boss saying that she was going to go home early because she was feeling sick. The boss, having just gotten over a cold said that he hoped it wasn’t something that he had given to her. A coworker overhearing the conversation said, ‘I hope not. She has morning sickness.'”

(Obviously, this instructor-in-training also had a sense of humor, as well.) I thought about it a while, and I just ended the session with, “So, in summary, one of the most important parts of the presentation design process is knowing your audience. In fact, that reminds me of a story…” I then just added the anecdote word-for-word, and I got a big laugh.

I created a whole series of posts on storytelling starting with Storytelling in Public Speaking .

(3) Finish Your Speech by Telling the End of an Earlier Story.

Tell the End of an Earlier Story

Then, I finished the presentation by telling how, just a year later, after a little outside training, I had to stand in front of over 400 people to give an acceptance speech for an award. This time, I was calm, and I used my humor to win over the audience, and I killed it. By continuing the story and providing a positive result at the end, it makes for a pretty nice presentation ending.

So start with a story where you had a challenge and end with a success story about how you overcame that challenge.

(4) End Your Presentation with an Open-Ended Question.

Ask an Open Ended Question

That’s why people are drawn to thought-provoking questions. So a great way to end your speech is with a well-designed, thought-provoking question.

When I teach a class, I use this technique before almost every break. For instance, if I teach an hour-long session, it will be easy for the audience to forget a lot of the content if it isn’t reinforced right away. So, by asking a thought-provoking question about the content, it stimulates the content in the minds of the audience.

When you ask questions, though, avoid easy questions where the answer is an obvious “yes” or “no.” Instead, ask open-ended questions. The easiest way to do this is to ask for the audience members’ opinions.

For instance, if my title is “Starting with a 3-Point Outline Will Help You Save Time When You Design Presentations,” I could end the speech with a question like, “Based on what we’ve talked about today, how can you see starting with a three-point outline helping you save time?”

Any answers that the audience provides will help me prove my point. The more the better.

(5) Give the Audience a Call-to-Action at the End of Your Speech.

End Your Speech with a Call to Action

Just as an FYI, here, though, if you ask them to do a single thing, they are more likely to do it. If you ask them to do a second thing, they are more likely to do neither. Sp, to prevent that and to inspire your audience, challenge them to do one specific thing from your speech.

If your presentation is about why your company should invest in advertising, make your call to action very specific. “So, my suggestion is that we increase our advertising budget by 10% and use that budget for additional re-targeting ads.”

The thing to keep in mind here is that the more calls to action that you have, the less likely they will do anything. So, make your call to action just a single item. And make the item easy to implement.

(6) The Echo Close Is an Inspirational Way to End Your Speech with a Bang.

The Echo Close for a Presentation

A wise man once said, “The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.” So, when you present, kindle the fire of knowledge. Kindle the fire of enthusiasm. Kindle the fire of humor. Kindle the fire of empathy. And you will kindle the fire of learning from your audience.

Another example might be.

So, in conclusion, brevity in public speaking is pretty important. In fact, George Orwell once said, “If it is possible to cut a word out of your speech, always cut it out.” So, when you create a presentation, cut the fluff. Cut the repetitive bullets. Cut the platitudes. And when you do, you will cut the confusion from your audience.

It is an easy technique if you prepare the ending and practice it a few times.

So that concludes the six ways that you can end your presentation with a bang. However… There is…

“One More Thing”

Steve Jobs was famous for concluding his keynotes with “One more thing…” then following it up with a surprising fact, feature, or innovation.

Why is this effective? Because it leaves people talking.

One More Thing

Regardless of how you choose to end your presentation, spend a little time on the ending. Make it flawless, and you will leave your audience wanting more! If you do, you will end your presentation with a bang!

Choose the Best Presentation Ending for Your Presentation Purpose

With all of the great choices, how do we know which presentation ending to use? Luckily, we have created a free handout to help you pick the best presentation ending. Although many of the tips above will work in many different types of speeches, the handout will help you identify which ending will accomplish specific purposes for your specific presentation.

For instance, if your goal is to help your audience retain the content, then summarizing your key points is a great choice. If your purpose is to inspire the audience, you might try the Call to Action or Echo technique instead. Just complete the form below for instant access!

Download the Free “How to End Your Presentation” Handout!

by Doug Staneart | Podcasts , presentation skills

View More Posts By Category: Free Public Speaking Tips | leadership tips | Online Courses | Past Fearless Presentations ® Classes | Podcasts | presentation skills | Uncategorized

How to Start and End a Presentation: 10 Practical Tips to Grab Attention and Make an Impact

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How to Start and End a Presentation

No matter how well-crafted and planned the body of your presentation, its impact depends on its opening and ending.  On one hand, you have 30 seconds to grab your audience’s attention so people would be interested in hearing what you have to say. On the other, your ending is what your audience will be left with and will shape how they feel about your presentation and how they’ll remember it. This might be like a lot of pressure but the truth is, it’s easier than it sounds. This is why, in this article, we will help you achieve this and more with 10 practical tips on how to start and end a presentation effectively .

Article overview: The Opening: 5 Tips To Get Your Audience Invested  1. The Hook 2. Transition 3. Personal Story 4. Build Tension with Silence 5. Use Startling Statistics The Ending: 5 Tips To Make an Impact 1. The Rule of Three 2. Come Full Circle 3. Food for Thought Question Ending 4. Inspire with Personal Involvement 5. Make Your Audience Laugh

5 Practical Tips on How to Start a Presentation

Imagine you spent weeks preparing an amazing presentation with lots of valuable insight that you just can’t wait to share with your audience. Unfortunately, only a few minutes in, you notice that most of your viewers are on their phones scrolling and barely paying any attention to what you have to say. What happened?

Presenters and speakers often start with a long introduction. They introduce themselves, share how excited they are, thank the audience for attending, explain what they’re going to speak about in a minute, why the topic is important, etc. This might take only one or two minutes, however, when it comes to presentation,  two minutes without telling anything interesting might result in losing your audience. In fact, you only have 30 seconds to grab your audience’s attention .

This is why, no matter the topic and goal of your presentation, you must always captivate your audience’s attention first. Leave the introductions and summaries for later .

In this section, we’ll talk about ways to hook your audience in the first 30 seconds and get them invested in what you have to say in your presentation.

1. The Hook

Anything unpredictable that catches you off-guard, will get your attention.

This tactic, masterfully named as a metaphor for attracting fish with a juicy worm on a hook, refers to a few-second short story, metaphor, shocking fact, statistics, analogy, controversial statement, or anything unconventional and unexpected that will capture your viewer’s imagination. We’ll have a look at three examples for hooks.

1.1 Bold Claim

“Here’s all you have to know about men and women: women are crazy, men are stupid.” This opening line by stand-up comedy legend George Carlin is a great example of a hook in the form of a bold claim. If you’re confident enough with your presentation and you have a bold claim up to your sleeve, don’t save it for the end. Instead, shoot that bullet confidently the second you start your presentation. It will immediately catch your audience off-guard and you will have it paying attention to your every word after that.

Here are some examples for bold claim starters in presentations and public speaking.

  • “What you’re doing right now at this very moment is killing you.” ( Nilofer Merchant )
  • “Sadly, in the next 18 minutes when I do our chat, four Americans that are alive will be dead through the food that they eat.” ( Jamie Oliver )
  • “I’m going to try to increase the lifespan of every single person in this room by seven and a half minutes. Literally, you will live seven and a half minutes longer than you would have otherwise just because you watched this talk.” ( Jane McGonagall )
  • “I don’t want to alarm anybody in this room. However, it’s just come to my attention that the person to your right is a liar.” ( Pamela Meyer )

1.2 Imagine

One of the greatest ways to get attention and start strong is through storytelling. People love stories and are always interested in hearing one. In fact, many presentations may revolve around a story or just use small anecdotes to enhance their message. With this being said, amongst the best methods to create a compelling story is to get your audience involved. To do so, make them imagine themselves in the shoes of the main character. This attention-grabber invites your viewers to create a mental image and get emotionally invested.

Here are examples of speeches starting with the Imagine play:

  • “I want you, guys, to imagine that you’re a soldier, running through the battlefield. Now, you’re shot in the leg with a bullet that severs your femoral artery. This bleed is extremely traumatic and can kill you in less than 3 minutes. Unfortunately, by the time a medic actually gets to you, what the medic has on his or her belt can take 5 minutes or more with the application of pressure to stop that type of bleed.” ( Joe Landolina )
  • “Imagine a big explosion as you climb through 3000 feet. Imagine a plane full of smoke, imagine an engine going clack-clack-clack-clack-clack. Well, I had a unique seat that day.”( Ric Elias )

1.3. Humourous Twists

Great stories have unexpected plot twists. The best stories, however, have a funny plot twist. Depending on your topic, you can start by telling your story, get your audience in the mood for a serious talk, and then contradict all expectations with a hilarious spin.

  • “I need to make a confession at the outset here. A little over 20 years ago I did something that I regret. Something that I’m not particularly proud of. Something that in many ways I wish no one would ever know. But here I feel kind of obliged to reveal. In the late 1980s, in a moment of youthful indiscretion, I went to law school.” ( Daniel Pink )

2. Transition

Your next step would be to make an organic transition between your hook and the main point of your presentation. You can do this seamlessly or by linking directly with “I tell you this, because”, “This brings us to…”. Mohammed Qahtani, for example, does this transition so smoothly, that you’ll never even catch it.

First, as a hook, he chooses to use a prop. He literally goes on stage and lights a cigarette, capitalizing on unpredictability, originality, bold statement, humor, and immediately uses the second hook in the form of a provocative question, asking the audience “You think smoking kills?”. The third thing he does is strike with shocking data that he immediately admits to being fake. He already has the audience on the tip of his fingers. Having accomplished that, Mohammed Qahtani is ready to finally move to the body of the presentation and reveal his actual message.

3. Personal Story

Another storytelling technique besides making people from your audience imagine themselves in a particular situation, is to start with your own personal story. One that is relevant to the topic of your presentation. Your personal involvement and experience give you credibility in the eyes of the viewers, and, as we mentioned, everyone loves to hear an interesting story. This is because stories are relatable, easy to identify with communicating honesty, openness, and connection.

4. Build Tension with Silence

Interestingly enough, saying nothing is also a very powerful option. In fact, standing in front of an audience and confidently keeping silent is as powerful as making a bold statement. Silence will definitely build tension and pique your audience’s curiosity about what you have to say. Be careful, however, as this technique requires knowing your timing.

5. Use Startling Statistics

Sometimes you just can’t think of a story, a joke, or a specific statement that is bold enough. And that’s okay. As a last resort, but also a pretty effective one, you can always rely on curious shocking statistics, related to your topic, to instantly gain people’s attention. Take your time researching curious statistics that will emphasize the seriousness of your topic or as a tool to start over the top.

To sum it up, your presentation opening follows 5 steps:

  • Hook: You immediately strike your audience instantly with something interesting and unconventional they wouldn’t expect.
  • Transition: You link your hook to your main point.
  • Introduction: Once you already have your audience’s attention, you can finally make a very brief introduction with something relevant to your topic.
  • Preview: Give your audience a brief preview of what you’re going to talk about.
  • Benefits: Tell your audience how will they benefit from listening to your presentation. (ex. “By the end, you will already know how to…”)

Keep in mind, that your opening, consisting of these 5 steps, should be brief and ideally not exceed 2 minutes . If you manage to make a great hook, transition, introduction, review and list the benefits in 2 minutes, you already have your audience’s full attention and they will be listening to your every word throughout the body of your presentation.

5 Practical Tips on How to End a Presentation

Let’s consider this situation. You start watching a movie that instantly opens with a jaw-dropping suspenseful scene that raises questions and makes you want to unravel the mystery. This scene will certainly make your stay through the movie. You are very invested, you love the story, the build-up keeps you on the edge of your seat until the end when the reveal is so underwhelming, you feel disappointed. The ending doesn’t fit the intensity of the story and feels incomplete and rushed. How does this relate to your presentation?

Having a great start for your presentation is what will keep your audience interested in what you have to say. However, the end is what your audience will be left with and will shape how they feel about your presentation and how they’ll remember it.  In short, if you fail your opening, you will still be able to catch up with your presentation and capitalize with a great closing line. But an underwhelming conclusion can kill the velocity of a good presentation and ruin the overall experience.

Let’s look at some practical tips and examples by great presenters to get inspired and never let that happen.

1. The Rule of Three

This powerful technique in speech writing refers to the collection of three words, phrases, sentences, or lines. In photography, there’s a similar rule, known as the Rule of Thirds, that serves to divide an image into three. In writing, the Rule of Three combines a collection of thoughts into three entities with combined brevity and rhythm to create a pattern.

Information presented in a group of three sticks in our heads better than in other groups. This is why this principle presents your ideas in more enjoyable and memorable ways for your audience.  It also serves to divide up a speech or emphasize a certain message. Let’s see a couple of examples where the rule is applied in different forms.

Examples of the Rule of three in Speeches

  • “ I came, I saw, I conquered .” (Veni, Vidi, Vici. ) by Julius Caesar in a letter to the Roman Senate
  • “…this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people , shall not perish from the earth.” from Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address
  • “ It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. lt means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.” from Steve Job’s Stanford Commencement Speech

In Veni Vidi Vici, the rule serves to divide the concept of Caesar’s victory into three parts to prolong the conclusion in order to give it more power. The “came” and “ saw” parts are technically obvious and unnecessary in terms of context. However, they serve to build up the conclusion of conquering, creating a story, rhythm, and, ultimately, a memorable and powerful line. A single “I conquered” wouldn’t impress the Senate that much, let alone become such a legendary phrase preserved in history.

Lincoln’s famous speech ending shows an excellent practice of the Rule of Three in the form of repetition to emphasize the new role of the Government.  “That Government of the people shaw not perish from the earth.” would still be a good line, however, the repetition makes it way more powerful and memorable.

And last, Steve Job uses the Rule of Three in the form of repetition to accomplish building up the conclusion and emphasizing what “it means”.  This repetition gives rhythm and helps the audience to be more receptive, stay focused, and follow the speaker to the final conclusion.

You can also use the Rule of Three to close your presentation by giving your audience two negatives and ending with a positive . Typical structures would be “This is not… this is not… but it is”; “You wouldn’t… you wouldn’t… but you would..”, etc.

For example, you can conclude a speech about self-growth with something similar to “Your future isn’t a matter of chance, it isn’t a matter of circumstances, it’s a matter of choice.”

2. Come Full Circle

In short, this means capitalizing  on your message by ending your presentation the exact way you started it . If done right, this is a powerful tool to make an impact. Usually, you begin your presentation with a statement that piques your audience’s curiosity. You use it to set the topic and start building on it. You take your audience on a journey, you make them start at one point, follow them through the entire journey, and make them end at the same point. By repeating the opening line as an ending, now the message makes more sense, it’s way more personal and makes a satisfying logical conclusion .

A good example of this comes from Yubing Zang in her speech “Life Begins at the End of Your Comfort Zone.” The speaker opens her TED talk with that same line to take you on a journey. You experience her story, you learn how fear is the biggest thief of dreams while comfort is a drug that keeps you from following them. After that strong message, she finishes with that same phrase. In the end, this phrase isn’t just an abstract quote, now it makes more sense and feels more real and personal.

You can also use the full circle method to start and finish your presentation with the same question. As an opening line, your question will make your audience think. It will compel them to listen to your presentation and learn the answers. As an ending, however, this same question will become rhetorical .

And speaking of questions…

3. Food for Thought Question Ending

The easiest way to end a speech on a good note is to leave your audience with a question. The kind of open-ended question that will inspire your audience to reflect on . Such questions can be so inviting, they will give your audience something exciting to think about and even think of throughout the day.

Examples of open-ended questions, depending on your topic, could sound like this.

  • What if it doesn’t work out that way?
  • What does this look like for you?
  • If you could do it over again, what would you do differently?

Unlike close-ended questions that the viewers can answer immediately on the spot and forget about your speech later, interesting open-ended questions that give them food for thought will inevitably surface on occasion.

For example, Lera Boroditski closes her topic on “How Language Shapes the Way We Think” with ” And that gives you the opportunity to ask: why do I think the way that I do? How could I think differently? And also, what thoughts do I wish to create?”

In order for your open-ended question to become food for thought, make sure your presentation raises it organically . It should sound like a relevant and logical conclusion to what you’ve built during your speech. Otherwise, the question would be forced and would seem like coming from nowhere. The best way to think of such an open-ended question is to reflect on what is the question you wished to answer during your presentation but couldn’t. Something that doesn’t have a solution yet.

  • Why do people fear losing things that they do not even have yet?
  • Why do we strive for perfection if it is not attainable?
  • How much control do you have over your life?
  • When will we reach a point where terraforming Mars will be our only chance at human survival? How can you influence this deadline?

This will give a great puzzle for your audience to solve and something to remember your presentation with, for a long time.

4. Inspire with Personal Involvement

If you have a story to share, don’t hesitate to inspire your audience with it during your own presentations.

This method is most powerful when we share a personal story or experience . Our vulnerability and personal touch are what will help you inspire your audience without sounding insincere or forcing them a piece of advice out of nowhere. The key here is to have credibility and personal involvement . It might come from your degree, accomplishments, or from your life’s story. Also, make sure the story is relatable and encourages empathy from your audience.

Steve Jobs gave a commencement speech at Stanford University sharing his personal experiences in order to inspire change in his audience’s mindset. He uses his authority and credibility to shape the spirit of leadership and entrepreneurship in young people. He aims to inspire people that they should learn to color outside the lines instead of following the patterns and structure of society. And he serves as a great example with his own life story and accomplishments .

Which makes the ending memorable and impactful: “ Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary. Stay hungry. Stay foolish. ”

In conclusion, the entire speech builds up to this conclusion making it powerful as the personal involvement and experience make it sincere and inspirational.

5. Make Your Audience Laugh

If your topic allows it, one of the best ways to make your presentation memorable and a great experience for your audience is to end with a joke. Just make sure to craft a joke that relates to the main point of your presentation.

As an example for this tip, we chose the TED talk of webcartoonist Randall Munroe where he answers simple what-if questions using math, physics, logic, and -you guessed it- humor.

He ends by sharing an allegedly personal experience about receiving an email from a reader with a single subject line “Urgent”. “And this was the entire email: If people had wheels and could fly, how would we differentiate them from airplanes? Urgent. And I think that there are some questions math just cannot answer. ”

Final Words

In conclusion, the start and end of your presentation are crucial to its success. No matter the topic and goal of your presentation, you must always captivate your audience’s attention first, leaving the introductions and summaries for later. Having a great start for your presentation is what will keep your audience interested in what you have to say. However, the end is what your audience will be left with and will shape how they feel about your presentation and how they’ll remember it.  We hope we managed to inspire your inner public speaker to rock your presentation like a pro.

In the meantime, you could also check some more insights on related topics, gather inspiration, or simply grab a freebie?

  • Digital Marketing Trends 2022: How To Win An Audience and Keep It
  • 30 Free Marketing Presentation Templates with Modern Design
  • 35+ Free Infographic PowerPoint Templates to Power Your Presentations

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13 Powerful Ways How to End a Presentation

13 Powerful Ways How to End a Presentation

In my experience, a lot of my public speaking students give much more attention to how they start their speech rather than how to end it. Many of them don’t realize that how you end a speech is of paramount importance, too. After all, the last things your audience hears from you may make the biggest lasting impression.

What are some powerful ways how to end a presentation? There are some proven techniques for ending a presentation, like giving your audience a call to action or using the rule of three. You may also use some lesser-known ways like giving visual imagery or asking them a question.

Now, let’s jump right in!

Table of Contents

How to End Your Presentation in a Powerful Way?

Today, I am going to show you 13 proven tips that I have found highly effective for ending your speech in a powerful way. And when I am done, you will be able to confidently give an ending to any presentation.

#1 Give Your Audience a “Call to Action”

A call to action is not only one of the most common ways to end a speech , but it is certainly one of the most powerful. The type of call to action you will give your listeners is based upon the tone and subject of your presentation.

The first step to planning this type of ending is to know what kind of action you want your audience to take. Then, find a way to tell them to take that action. Don’t just assume people will figure that out on their own; it’s okay to tell them, too.

Are you giving a marketing talk with the intention of selling a product or service to your audience members? Maybe your call to action is to encourage them to become a customer of yours.

Or maybe you are promoting a lifestyle of volunteering and helping others. Your call to action could be telling your audience how they should get involved with charity at a local level. Do you see where I’m going with this?

One common way of doing this is to give your audience two possible actions they could take, and the outcomes of each. First, you should give them a negative action.

This is the thing you don’t want them to do. Elaborate what might happen if they take this action. Then, tell them the action you want them to take, and what positive outcome they may have. Here is an example:

“Let’s say that you decide not to invest in a retirement account today. What will your future look like after age 65? How will you know you will have enough to live on without a retirement account? You could end up still working into your 70’s without the ability to fully retire.

Or, you could invest in your future today. And when it is time for you to retire, you will be able to enjoy those years without worrying about how you will make ends meet. If this is the future you want for yourself and your family, stop by one of our local branches today to talk about opening a retirement account.”

Can you see where we are giving the negative action choice and the positive action choice in the example above? Remember, the positive action choice is the action that you want your audience to take.

#2 End With a Quote

Do you know of a good quote by a trusted source that would help drive your point home? Or do you have a self-written quote you wish to share? Your presentation ending may be a good time to use a relevant quote.

People love quotes , and they provide a satisfying ending. But make sure that your quote is appropriate for the tone and message of your speech .

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how to end a good presentation

If you give a quote about an unrelated matter, you are no longer delivering a powerful ending. Instead, you may just end up baffling your audience.

If you plan on writing a quote, devote a lot of your speech-planning time to coming up with just the right one. Or maybe you want to give a quote that you have already used on social media, in a book, in a previous presentation, or somewhere else. That is fine, as long as it is relevant.

#3 Give a Quick Summary of Your Message

This is one of the more common methods that I see recommended to the beginners when it comes to ending a speech.

What is the message of your speech? Once you can effectively answer that question, write a brief summary ending that is based on that message.

After all, this is the thing you want your audience to remember most about your presentation. Ending with it will help drill the message into their minds. Don’t leave them walking away, confused about the purpose of your talk.

One easy way you can do this is by setting up a question at the beginning of your talk, and then answering it at the very end. This has the added benefit of keeping your audience hooked throughout your presentation , waiting for you to deliver that answer!

#4 Offer a Visual Image

Visual imagery is incredibly powerful to the human mind. That is why it might be a good idea to show an image to your audience that relates to your point when you are giving your closing.

While this may be easier if you are giving a PowerPoint slideshow during your talk , there are certainly other ways to incorporate this method.

Ask yourself what kind of image relates to the purpose of your talk, and might also be a good thing for your audience to see before they walk out the door? What will help solidify your message in their memories?

#5 Don’t End With a Question and Answer Session

Many good presentations include a question and answer session at some point to allow the audience to ask questions and get answers from the speaker.

And while many speakers usually have a question and answer period after making their main points, they will open up the floor. However, you should not make this the last thing you do during a presentation.

A lot of speakers don’t realize that this sort of ending is not powerful, nor is it memorable . It makes you go off track, and after all those questions?

Well, your audience may lose sight of the purpose of your speech . A negative question from an audience member can also leave a bad taste in everyone’s mouth if it is the last thing they hear before they exit.

Don’t get me wrong, it is always a good idea to open the floor up to answer questions from your audience. But after that is done, end the question and answer period to give a proper ending. This will make a much greater, and more positive, impact.

#6 Ever Heard of the “Rule of Three”?

If you’ve attended a lot of public speaking events, chances are that you have heard someone use the rule of three before. But what exactly does this term refer to? There is a whole school of thought that says that our words are more powerful when we present information in sets of threes.

Look up famous quotes , and notice most of them present information in sets of threes. For example, you can say something like, “ Retirement accounts can provide three things for your future: financial stability, peace of mind, and something to fall back on during hard times”.

Three-word slogans or using the same memorable word three times can also both work. You can tailor the rule of three ideology to fit your own specific needs, but the principle remains the same.

#7 Ending With a Story

This tactic may take some extra planning, but it creates a very relatable experience for your listeners. After all, sharing a story with your audience gives a personal touch that lets them feel closer to you when you are speaking.

And if you have read any of my other articles , you know I’m a big fan of storytelling.

When you end with a story, try to make it brief. You don’t want to start something that is going to be long and drawn-out when you are trying to bring everything to a close.

In order to make this method really compelling, be sure to choose a story that is both personal and emotionally compelling. This creates a more powerful impact on your audience.

If you’re looking to take this a step further, I can offer you a more advanced tip. Start your story at the beginning of your presentation, and promise your audience you will get back to it later.

Then, end your speech with the rest of that same story. This will keep them hooked throughout your speech, waiting for you to finish that story!

#8 Have a Unique Tagline? Use it

Not all speakers have a personal tagline associated with them. But if you do have one, you should probably consider using it during your closing.

And what do I mean by a unique tagline? Well, do you have a catchphrase for you or your brand ? Have you coined a well-known saying in the business world or on social media?

If there is a tagline that you consistently use, you should consider using it as an ending for your speech. This helps to both reinforce your message in the short term, and build your brand in the long term.

In between the times that you give public speeches , I recommend that you constantly use this unique tagline as much as you can on social media and in other outlets.

#9 Go Back to the Beginning

Many students are baffled when I tell them to end their presentation by going back to the beginning . But when you think about it, this is a practice that really works.

Did you use a specific hook during your opening? Use that during your closing. Did you open with a quote or interesting fact? Restate it. Do you need to wrap up something that you started at the beginning? Wrap it up.

This can also work in reverse, as a lot of speakers use the content of their ending to decide what their beginning will be. This is why proper planning can help make a speech perfect.

#10 Ask Your Audience a Compelling Question

Many speeches are actually ended with the speaker asking the audience a compelling question that is relevant to the main topic. Because when you ask a question, people are automatically c ompelled to think about the topic in order to give a worthwhile answer.

Plan out a solid question related to your topic that will make your audience members think more in-depth about it.

For example, asking your audience what they think life will be like after retirement without a retirement account will certainly get people thinking about retirement funds.

#11 Don’t be Afraid to Use Humor

Maybe you would rather use a joke instead of a story or quote to end your presentation. Depending on your personality and the tone of your talk, this may actually be the most appropriate approach.

Examples of this include if you are known for your humorous personality, or if your talk is playful and friendly instead of professional and serious.

Humor is a good way to show your audience that you are trying to relate to them on a personal and authentic level. It is also a good feeling when everyone is walking away smiling and laughing. After all, laughter releases feel-good chemicals in the brain!

It almost goes without saying that you should not choose a joke that is sexually inappropriate, or culturally offensive to anyone. While these may seem funny to some of us in our personal lives, you should never use an offensive joke during a presentation.

#12 Plan Your Ending in Advance

If you know me, then you know I am a big fan of planning ahead. Rehearsing, planning and speech-writing can be incredibly effective tools for making sure your presentation is ultimately successful.

And if your speech is not an on-the-spot kind of thing, it should be easy for you to take time to plan the entire thing. This includes giving careful attention to the ending.

You could even take out a piece of paper with a pen, and write a list of possible endings to use . From there, you can make a proper decision. Once you have chosen, start fleshing out your ending plan with more details.

#13 No Matter What, Offer a Clear Sign You’ve Ended

You don’t want your audience still sitting in their chairs long after you’ve finished, uncertain of whether you are done or not.

I am surprised by the number of students I have taught who will walk off stage before making a clear ending. If you want to keep your audience coming back to see future presentations of yours, you have to give a clear and satisfying ending.

This can be tricky to master, but I promise you that it is worth it. Don’t fidget with things, shuffle your note cards, move about awkwardly, or randomly leave the stage.

Give your audience a verbal cue to indicate that you are finished, without sounding generic or cliche. Then, take a strong, confident stance.

And here’s an extra tip…

I want my readers to feel like they are getting all the information they need when they come to my blog. And that is why I am going to give you an extra tip in addition to the 13 that I have given you above.

Picture yourself as part of the audience instead of the speaker. You have just spent the better part of an afternoon of your life listening to a speaker giving a presentation on stage in front of you.

Throughout their presentation, you have listened intently, you took notes, and you applauded at the appropriate times. You even raised your hand and asked that burning question that was in the back of your mind all throughout the first part of the speech.

But before the speaker walks off stage, they take a brief moment to thank the audience members for coming out, listening, asking questions, and staying until the very end.

Whether you realize it or not, this speaker has just made a connection with you.

An important part of giving any speech is making your audience feel valued. That is why you should make sure you always thank your audience after a presentation. I explain to my students all the time that there are many reasons why this is a major key to giving a successful speech.

Without an audience, you would be speaking to an empty room of no one but yourself. Be sure to thank them each and every time.

The Tone Sets the Ending

So, what kind of presentation are you giving?

Clearly define the purpose of your speech long before you even begin or end it. This is important whether you are talking with or without notes .

Are you giving a persuasive speech on behalf of your business with the hopes of gaining more clients? Or is it a commencement speech at a college graduation? Or maybe an impromptu speech?

Obviously, you can see how these two types of talks have two distinctly different tones. It would not look very tasteful if you were trying to sell a product or service during a commencement speech.

And vice-versa, not using any sales techniques during a business speech may not be effective for trying to promote your services.

What kind of ending you should choose?

The tone of your presentation even can be important when you are deciding what to wear. A business talk demands a professional look, while a more casual gig may not.

And the reason I bring up tone is that it is an important part of deciding what kind of ending you should choose. If you’re giving a more informal presentation, then a joke or personal story may be most appropriate.

On the other hand, an incredibly formal, business-oriented company presentation for a room of potential clients may demand a much different kind of ending.

Take a few minutes to sit down and think about the tone of your message. If possible, do it with a co-worker, trusted friend, or mentor.

Try to put your thoughts down on paper so you can better organize them. Then, try to list various appropriate endings that you think you might be able to use for your presentation.

So, how much thought are you giving to your closing statement now? What method of closing do you prefer best? And what have you learned about the tone of your speeches?

After this, you should be able to end your speech with confidence , and send a powerful message to your audience. I have given you tips such as using the rule of three, asking a compelling question, and making sure you clearly mark your ending.

If you have any other tips that you would like to share, feel free to leave them in the comment section below!

Does public speaking cause you to get all teared up? Check out my article about how to give a speech without crying.

Related Questions

What does the term “closing” refer to? The ending to your speech is often referred to as closing. Learning how to give a powerful closing to your speech is just as important as any other part of the presentation itself.

How do I effectively start a presentation? While it may sound like a paradox, you can add information from your written conclusion to your opening statement. Make sure that you have planned a clear ending before you take this approach. This also works in reverse, as many speakers tend to go back to the beginning for their closing.

How do I write a witty closing remark? Don’t force it, or it will sound awkward. After you’ve written a draft, ask a speaking friend or trusted mentor for feedback. Remember what the overall tone of your presentation is before you get started.

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How To End A Presentation To Make A Lasting Impression (9 Techniques)

How To End A Presentation To Make A Lasting Impression (9 Techniques)

This blog provides creative ideas on how to end a presentation with a punch. Studies show that when people try recalling information, they usually recall the beginning and the end. Therefore, you must leave an impact on the audience with a strong closing statement. A weak ending can leave the audience unenthused and uninspired, they may even forget your message within a few hours. But a strong ending motivates and empowers. It encourages people to take action.

So how to end a presentation well? Here are a few techniques you can try – 

End your presentation on time

Close with a clear cut ending

Conclude your speech with a story

Come full circle at the end of your presentation

Use the title close technique

…Always a high note, always the high road

A sound bite

A quick presentation recap

End with a strong visual image

Sounds like a no brainer? You will be surprised how many people struggle with this seemingly basic idea. At the root of it lies a tendency to cram too much content and then hurrying through to the end, often straying beyond the allotted time slot.

Being on time communicates to the audience that you respect their time and also leaves an impression about you being organized and well planned.

Some tactical tips

Remember, the ending time of the professional presentation includes any Q&A and discussion time so the audience has the space for interactivity.

You should state at the beginning of the meeting your intention to end on time and ask for audience cooperation. This includes agreeing to put side topics/conversations into a parking lot; recognizing when the deviations from the core topic take place, etc.

In the end, when you do successfully end on time, be sure to remind the audience of the fact that you ended on time and thank them for their cooperation.

It is indeed a weird moment when the audience is unsure whether you have ended the presentation and transitioned into a general drift of conversations or worse, an awkward silence. Be sure to include a definitive statement to let the audience know that your presentation has arrived at its final destination. This can be a clear cut, ‘thank you!’,’ With this, my presentation comes to a close’, a wave, a bow, but let it be a clear-cut indication that this is the end and the audience is free to leave the discussion.

Storytelling is often underutilized as a tool to leave an impact towards the end of PowerPoint presentations . While there is a lot of literature out there on the art of storytelling (See our own post here), clever use of stories to conclude the presentation can powerfully and in emotional ways reinforce your core messages and make these memorable.

Towards the end, you do want the story to be relatively brief and can start with a statement like “Let me end my presentation on a personal note….”

Give the audience a sense of closure by referencing your opening message at the end. It gives the audience a feeling of coherence and consistency.

You will need to plan for this ahead of time though. Some tips and ideas:

  • Pose a question which you answer at the end
  • Tell a story in the beginning but leave it unfinished until the end
  • Repeat the first slide, this work especially well with powerful images or quotes
  • Reference a comment, someone, in the audience made and connect it to the closure

Some presenters bring back the title slide to close their presentation. It is a subtle yet effective technique to keep the audience grounded and connected to the core topic and the content

This creates a sense of bookend to your entire presentation and can be used to bring your audience full circle as referenced above.

Your presentation is a great platform to uplift the spirits of the audience. While some topics easily lend themselves to positive messages, there is always light at the end of the tunnel even if you are delivering bad news

There is almost never a situation when you cannot inspire people. And you must never leave an opportunity to. There are many ways this can be achieved

  • Use vibrant, visual language
  • Appeal to the broader sensibilities of the audience
  • Think long term, not immediate fall outs
  • Most of all stay optimistic, positive, and energetic

A sound bite is like a slogan, a catch-phrase that attracts attention. It challenges you to condense your presentation into a pithy phrase?

If you can find a core message of your business presentation that is catchy and short, you can expect the audience to have a higher recall of your presentation. Some examples, inspired by famous quotes.

  • Stay hungry but stay balanced
  • With this project, we didn’t fail, we just found 35 ways that don’t work
  • 100% of the shots you don’t take don’t succeed

One common approach that never fails to impress is the “tell them” method.

It goes like this:

  • Tell them what you are going to tell them
  • Tell them what you just told them

Studies state that people only absorb 30% of what you say. So this seeming repetition helps. But the real reason this method has stayed in vogue is that it plays on our innate need to see the information multiple times to understand patterns and start to believe in it

One pitfall to avoid here is to avoid staleness by saying boring phrases such as “In conclusion” or “To sum up”

Instead, spur the audience with phrases like “Where is this all leading?” or “What does this all mean?”

A picture is worth knowing how many words. This adage is equally true when you are making a presentation.

Find an image that evokes the emotion that characterizes your presentation and the feeling you would like to leave the audience with. This can be a humorous, inspirational, or descriptive image that caps up/sums up your message. For example, in a message to the executives, a brand manager in a pharma company very effectively used the image of a child’s facial expression in vivid detail post receiving the painful therapy that the brand was trying to replace.

Here are a few slides examples of how to end a presentation effectively:

How to End a Presentation

Thank You Slide

View Thank you Slide 

Explore our extensive library of Thank You Slides to get creative ideas on how to end a presentation.

Lessons Learnt Template

Lessons Learnt Template

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How to End a Presentation

Questions Template

View Questions Template 

Explore our Questions Slides to get creative ideas on how to end a presentation.

Quotes template - How to End a Presentation

Quotes Template

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Quotes template - How to End a Presentation

Explore our Quotes Slides  to get creative ideas on how to end a presentation.

Now you don’t have to scour the web to find out the right templates. Download our PowerPoint Templates from within PowerPoint. See how ?

Related Articles

How To Start A Presentation? 10 Winning Opening Slides

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What are the main difficulties when giving presentations?

How to create an effective presentation, after that, how do i give a memorable presentation, how to connect with the audience when presenting.

If you’ve ever heard someone give a powerful presentation, you probably remember how it made you feel. Much like a composer, a good speaker knows precisely when each note should strike to captivate their audience’s attention and leave them with a lasting impression.

No one becomes a great public speaker or presenter without practice. And almost everyone can recall a time one of their presentations went badly — that’s a painful part of the learning process.

Whether you’re working within a small creative team or a large organization, public speaking and presentation skills are vital to communicating your ideas. Knowing how to present your vision can help you pitch concepts to clients, present ideas to your team, and develop the confidence to participate in team meetings.

If you have an upcoming presentation on the horizon and feel nervous, that’s normal. Around 15-30% of the general population experience a fear of public speaking . And, unfortunately, social anxiety is on the rise, with a 12% increase in adults over the last 20 years . 

Learning how to give a good presentation can dismantle your fears and break down these barriers, ensuring you’re ready to confidently share your point of view. 

It’s the week before your presentation, and you’re already feeling nervous . Maybe there’ll be an important mentor in the room you need to impress, or you’re looking for an opportunity to show your boss your value. Regardless of your countless past presentations, you still feel nervous. 

Sharing your vision and ideas with any sized group is intimidating. You’re likely worrying about how you’ll perform as a presenter and whether the audience will be interested in what you offer. But nerves aren’t inherently negative — you can actually use this feeling to fuel your preparation.

businesswoman-speaking-from-a-podium-to-an-audience-in-a-conference-room-how-to-give-a-good-presentation

It’s helpful to identify where your worries are coming from and address your fears. Here are some common concerns when preparing for an upcoming presentation:

Fear of public speaking: When you share your ideas in front of a group, you’re placing yourself in a vulnerable position to be critiqued on your knowledge and communication skills . Maybe you feel confident in your content, but when you think about standing in front of an audience, you feel anxious and your mind goes blank.

It’s also not uncommon to have physical symptoms when presenting . Some people experience nausea and dizziness as the brain releases adrenaline to cope with the potentially stressful situation . Remember to take deep breaths to recenter yourself and be patient, even if you make a mistake.

Losing the audience’s attention: As a presenter, your main focus is to keep your audience engaged. They should feel like they’re learning valuable information or following a story that will improve them in life or business.

Highlight the most exciting pieces of knowledge and ensure you emphasize those points in your presentation. If you feel passionate about your content, it’s more likely that your audience will experience this excitement for themselves and become invested in what you have to say.

Not knowing what content to place on presentation slides: Overloading presentation slides is a fast way to lose your audience’s attention. Your slides should contain only the main talking points and limited text to ensure your audience focuses on what you have to say rather than becoming distracted by the content on your slides.

Discomfort incorporating nonverbal communication: It’s natural to feel stiff and frozen when you’re nervous. But maintaining effective body language helps your audience stay focused on you as you speak and encourages you to relax.

If you struggle to incorporate body language into your presentations, try starting small by making hand gestures toward your slides. If you’re working with a large audience, use different parts of the stage to ensure everyone feels included. 

Each presenter has their own personal brand and style. Some may use humor to break the ice, while others might appeal to the audience’s emotional side through inspiring storytelling. 

Watching online presentations, such as TED talks, is an excellent way to expose yourself to various presentation styles and develop your own. While observing others, you can note how they carry themselves on stage and learn new ways to keep your audience engaged.

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Once you’ve addressed what’s causing your fears, it’s time to prepare for a great presentation. Use your past experience as inspiration and aim to outshine your former self by learning from your mistakes and employing new techniques. Here are five presentation tips to help you create a strong presentation and wow your audience:

1. Keep it simple

Simple means something different to everyone.

Before creating your presentation, take note of your intended audience and their knowledge level of your subject. You’ll want your content to be easy for your intended audience to follow.

Say you’re giving a presentation on improving your company’s operational structure. Entry-level workers will likely need a more straightforward overview of the content than C-suite leaders, who have significantly more experience. 

Ask yourself what you want your audience to take away from your presentation and emphasize those important points. Doing this ensures they remember the most vital information rather than less important supporting ideas. Try organizing these concepts into bullet points so viewers can quickly identify critical takeaways.

2. Create a compelling structure

Put yourself in your audience member’s shoes and determine the most compelling way to organize your information. Your presentation should be articulate , cohesive, and logical, and you must be sure to include all necessary supporting evidence to strengthen your main points.

If you give away all of your answers too quickly, your audience could lose interest. And if there isn’t enough supporting information, they could hit a roadblock of confusion. Try developing a compelling story that leads your audience through your thought processes so they can experience the ups and downs alongside you. 

By structuring your presentation to lead up to a final conclusion, you’re more likely to keep listeners’ attention. Once you’ve reached that conclusion, you can offer a Q&A period to put any of their questions or concerns to rest. 

3. Use visual aids

Appealing to various learning styles is a great way to keep everyone on the same page and ensure they absorb your content. Visual aids are necessary for visual learners and make it easier for people to picture your ideas.

Aim to incorporate a mixture of photos, videos, and props to engage your audience and convey your key points. For instance, if you’re giving a presentation on anthropology subject matter, you could show your audience an artifact to help them understand how exciting a discovery must have been. 

If your presentation is long, including a video for your audience to watch is an excellent way to give yourself a break and create new jumping-off points for your speech.

4. Be aware of design techniques and trends

Thanks to cutting-edge technology and tools, you have numerous platforms at your disposal to create a good presentation. But keep in mind that although color, images, and graphics liven things up, they can cause distraction when misused.

  Here are a few standard pointers for incorporating visuals on your slides: 

  • Don’t place blocks of small text on a single slide
  • Use a minimalistic background instead of a busy one
  • Ensure text stands out against the background color
  • Only use high-resolution photos
  • Maintain a consistent font style and size throughout the presentation
  • Don’t overuse transitions and effects

5. Try the 10-20-30 rule

Guy Kawasaki, a prominent venture capitalist and one of the original marketing specialists for Apple, said that the best slideshow presentations are less than 10 slides , last at most 20 minutes, and use a font size of 30. Following this strategy can help you condense your information, eliminate unnecessary ideas, and maintain your audience’s focus more efficiently.

Once you’re confident in creating a memorable presentation, it’s time to learn how to give one. Here are some valuable tips for keeping your audience invested during your talk: 

Tip #1: Tell stories

Sharing an anecdote from your life can improve your credibility and increase your relatability. And when an audience relates to you, they’re more likely to feel connected to who you are as a person and encouraged to give you their full attention, as they would want others to do the same.

Gill Hicks utilized this strategy well when she shared her powerful story, “ I survived a terrorist attack. Here’s what I learned .” In her harrowing tale, Hicks highlights the importance of compassion, unconditional love, and helping those in need.

If you feel uncomfortable sharing personal stories, that’s okay. You can use examples from famous individuals or create a fictional account to demonstrate your ideas.

Tip #2: Make eye contact with the audience

Maintaining eye contact is less intimidating than it sounds. In fact, you don’t have to look your audience members directly in their eyes — you can focus on their foreheads or noses if that’s easier.

Try making eye contact with as many people as possible for 3–5 seconds each. This timing ensures you don’t look away too quickly, making the audience member feel unimportant, or linger too long, making them feel uncomfortable.

If you’re presenting to a large group, direct your focus to each part of the room to ensure no section of the audience feels ignored. 

Group-of-a-business-people-having-meeting-in-a-conference-room-how-to-give-a-good-presentation

Tip #3: Work on your stage presence

Although your tone and words are the most impactful part of your presentation, recall that body language keeps your audience engaged. Use these tips to master a professional stage presence:

  • Speak with open arms and avoid crossing them
  • Keep a reasonable pace and try not to stand still
  • Use hand gestures to highlight important information

Tip #4: Start strong

Like watching a movie trailer, the first seconds of your talk are critical for capturing your audience’s attention. How you start your speech sets the tone for the rest of your presentation and tells your audience whether or not they should pay attention. Here are some ways to start your presentation to leave a lasting impression:

  • Use a quote from a well-known and likable influential person 
  • Ask a rhetorical question to create intrigue
  • Start with an anecdote to add context to your talk 
  • Spark your audience’s curiosity by involving them in an interactive problem-solving puzzle or riddle

Tip #5: Show your passion

Don’t be afraid of being too enthusiastic. Everyone appreciates a speaker who’s genuinely excited about their field of expertise. 

In “ Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance ,” Angela Lee Duckworth discusses the importance of passion in research and delivery. She delivers her presentation excitedly to show the audience how excitement piques interest. 

Tip #6: Plan your delivery

How you decide to deliver your speech will shape your presentation. Will you be preparing a PowerPoint presentation and using a teleprompter? Or are you working within the constraints of the digital world and presenting over Zoom?

The best presentations are conducted by speakers who know their stuff and memorize their content. However, if you find this challenging, try creating notes to use as a safety net in case you lose track.

If you’re presenting online, you can keep notes beside your computer for each slide, highlighting your key points. This ensures you include all the necessary information and follow a logical order.

Woman-presenting-charts-and-data-to-work-team-how-to-give-a-good-presentation

Tip #7: Practice

Practice doesn’t make perfect — it makes progress. There’s no way of preparing for unforeseen circumstances, but thorough practice means you’ve done everything you can to succeed.

Rehearse your speech in front of a mirror or to a trusted friend or family member. Take any feedback and use it as an opportunity to fine-tune your speech. But remember: who you practice your presentation in front of may differ from your intended audience. Consider their opinions through the lens of them occupying this different position.

Tip #8: Read the room

Whether you’re a keynote speaker at an event or presenting to a small group of clients, knowing how to read the room is vital for keeping your audience happy. Stay flexible and be willing to move on from topics quickly if your listeners are uninterested or displeased with a particular part of your speech.

Tip #9: Breathe

Try taking deep breaths before your presentation to calm your nerves. If you feel rushed, you’re more likely to feel nervous and stumble on your words.

The most important thing to consider when presenting is your audience’s feelings. When you approach your next presentation calmly, you’ll put your audience at ease and encourage them to feel comfortable in your presence.

Tip #10: Provide a call-to-action

When you end your presentation, your audience should feel compelled to take a specific action, whether that’s changing their habits or contacting you for your services.

If you’re presenting to clients, create a handout with key points and contact information so they can get in touch. You should provide your LinkedIn information, email address, and phone number so they have a variety of ways to reach you. 

There’s no one-size-fits-all template for an effective presentation, as your unique audience and subject matter play a role in shaping your speech. As a general rule, though, you should aim to connect with your audience through passion and excitement. Use strong eye contact and body language. Capture their interest through storytelling and their trust through relatability.

Learning how to give a good presentation can feel overwhelming — but remember, practice makes progress. Rehearse your presentation for someone you trust, collect their feedback , and revise. Practicing your presentation skills is helpful for any job, and every challenge is a chance to grow.

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Elizabeth Perry

Content Marketing Manager, ACC

6 presentation skills and how to improve them

How to write a speech that your audience remembers, how to make a presentation interactive and exciting, 3 stand-out professional bio examples to inspire your own, tell a story they can't ignore these 10 tips will teach you how, reading the room gives you an edge — no matter who you're talking to, writing an elevator pitch about yourself: a how-to plus tips, your ultimate guide on how to be a good storyteller, 18 effective strategies to improve your communication skills, similar articles, the importance of good speech: 5 tips to be more articulate, the 11 tips that will improve your public speaking skills, 30 presentation feedback examples, how to not be nervous for a presentation — 13 tips that work (really), how the minto pyramid principle can enhance your communication skills, 8 clever hooks for presentations (with tips), stay connected with betterup, get our newsletter, event invites, plus product insights and research..

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What It Takes to Give a Great Presentation

  • Carmine Gallo

how to end a good presentation

Five tips to set yourself apart.

Never underestimate the power of great communication. It can help you land the job of your dreams, attract investors to back your idea, or elevate your stature within your organization. But while there are plenty of good speakers in the world, you can set yourself apart out by being the person who can deliver something great over and over. Here are a few tips for business professionals who want to move from being good speakers to great ones: be concise (the fewer words, the better); never use bullet points (photos and images paired together are more memorable); don’t underestimate the power of your voice (raise and lower it for emphasis); give your audience something extra (unexpected moments will grab their attention); rehearse (the best speakers are the best because they practice — a lot).

I was sitting across the table from a Silicon Valley CEO who had pioneered a technology that touches many of our lives — the flash memory that stores data on smartphones, digital cameras, and computers. He was a frequent guest on CNBC and had been delivering business presentations for at least 20 years before we met. And yet, the CEO wanted to sharpen his public speaking skills.

how to end a good presentation

  • Carmine Gallo is a Harvard University instructor, keynote speaker, and author of 10 books translated into 40 languages. Gallo is the author of The Bezos Blueprint: Communication Secrets of the World’s Greatest Salesman  (St. Martin’s Press).

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How to End a Speech: The Best Tips and Examples

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Published Date : February 16, 2024

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As the introduction sets the stage, your conclusion seals the deal. The question, “How do you end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ?” is an essential query that each presenter or speaker must ask, given the final words’ impact and weight on your audience. 

Since your final words eventually have a lasting effect, you must make a striking thought to the people. Your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s ending is your last opportunity to reiterate the fundamental idea, inspire the listeners , motivate a group to take action, change an individual’s perspective, or make a final impression on them. 

If you are still wondering how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech that can appease your audience, then be worry-free because this guide can help you. Read this article to learn how to end a maid of honor Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , a graduation Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , and more because it contains the best tips and examples. 

Why is a Conclusion Important?

The audience is more likely not to forget the latest thing a speaker said due to the “Recency Effect” in learning. Hence, the conclusion of a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech serves as a signal to the audience that it is nearing the end, helping them recall the entire topic’s essential points. 

You can’t just suddenly stop speaking in front of your listeners because that will disappoint and confuse them. It is best to ensure they are left satisfied and knowledgeable about your speeches by closing them smoothly. 

Additionally, it is vital always to link your conclusion back to your introduction. The most effective way to do this method is through going back to your attention grabber or “hook.”

At the end of your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , it is where most of your audience’s lasting impression of everything you have said will form. Thus, if you ask how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , use its conclusion to secure the necessary components in your listeners’ minds. 

You might confuse, disappoint, or even leave the audience unconvinced without a satisfactory conclusion. With these thoughts, we can tell that it has a two-fold purpose: to signal the Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s end and reinforce the speaker’s message to the people. 

The Key Elements of a Good Conclusion

When contemplating how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , remember that your introduction is the appetizer, while your conclusion is its dessert. Conclusions must round off the topic and make a strong impression on people’s minds. 

To create a conclusion that will satisfy and sum up all the vital information from your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , consider these three key elements:

1. Reiterate the main idea

What is the central idea of your message? That is a secure place to start your conclusion. 

Above all, you have directed each part of your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech to support your topic, subject, or information. To start your conclusion, by all means, reiterate your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s main idea. 

Of course, making it different and fresh to the listeners would be best. You do not want to repeat it verbatim, making the audience feel like you are just redoing things. 

Somewhat loosen it up as you prepare to remind your audience why they would be well-provided to adopt your viewpoint or follow your suggestion. 

2. Summarize three primary points

Another vital element to answer your question on how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech is summarizing. For your overall summary, getting three main points is a good benchmark.

You do not have to restate each argument or claim because you can eventually pick three that you think are the most remarkable. In regards to your main idea, do not be dry and monotonous.

Avoid merely repeating three points; show your audience how those points strengthened your claim or Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech . Draw them together into a single special force, supplementing weight to your primary idea. 

3. Close on a high note

Leave your audience pleased and satisfied but also wanting more. When you are closing your conclusion, consider ending it with a capturing, thought-provoking concept. 

You may want to raise a rhetorical question or state a notable quote from your research. From time to time, good quotations serve as illustrations, stating what we want to mention with a bit of Confidence &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Having confidence is to believe in yourself and your ability. When you&#039;re confident, it means you know your worth, and you&#039;re content and comfortable in your skin. When it comes to confidence in public speaking and presentation skills, it impacts your speech&#039;s delivery and how the audience receives it.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;How to display confidence in public speaking and presentation skills&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;During a speech, your look and demeanor affect your audience&#039;s perception of you. If you display a clear look of confidence, your audience will be more likely to respond to your message. Presentations, particularly, can be challenging. Having a confident exterior can endear you to the people you&#039;re presenting to and make them more likely to engage with you. Displaying confidence in public speaking and presentation skills can make or break your speech or presentation.&nbsp;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;How to display &lt;/strong&gt;&lt;strong&gt;confidence in public speaking&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Maintain an open stance&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Maintain eye contact&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Use positive body language.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Move around the stage self-assuredly.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Incorporate meaningful pauses&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Prepare extensively before your presentation.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/confidence/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">confidence and style. 

Another method to add some “food for thought” to your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s conclusion is to connect your primary idea to a more in-depth scenario. Also, note that your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s closing line needs extra effort . 

The portion acts as your last opportunity to make it stick, so never introduce new information in your ending. Additional information can confuse your listeners and take them away from the essential features of a conclusion, which are:

  • Restatement of your primary idea
  • Summary of three main points
  • Remarkable closing line

What are the Considerations on How to End a Speech?

When you imagine how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech or presentation, there are several things to consider when it comes to their close, which include:

  • Is your ending engaging?
  • Does your conclusion restate your message?
  • Have you identified the next step you want your listeners to take clearly?

Too often, speakers or presenters believe that people will infer what they should act next. The reality or truth is that even the most talented speaker can benefit from setting off a clear call to action to their audience. 

When it is particular, uncomplicated to perform, and aligns with the audience’s concerns, needs, and wants, they are more likely to take upon your persuasion , especially if you are making a persuasive speech. 

Always consider that an impactful ending encourages, empowers, and motivates people. See the best tips in the next part to learn how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech . 

What are some Good Ways to End a Speech?

A study shows that when they need to recall information, they best remember the beginning and the end. Therefore, impacting your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s closing is essential because people will mostly think of that part. 

Here are seven different ways to choose and make an unforgettable ending for your audience if you still doubt how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech most appealingly. 

1. The Summary Close

This method on how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech is about the most direct, specific, and straightforward one on the list. The history of how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech or presentation also refers to this as a “recap” close.

If you end your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech with a summary, clarify your most significant idea and convey to the listeners that it is what you want them to take. However, that does not imply that your summary close is not engaging. 

2. The Surprise Close 

Several of the best movie endings of all time were surprising conclusions, outright shockers, and wicked twists. Why do you think they are so memorable?

It is because the viewers or the audience did not expect that ending. When we experience something we did not anticipate, it turns out that our brains are more active. 

In other cases, we might have also expected a different or another scenario for the conclusion. Hence, we become notably accustomed to what occurs when a pattern breaks.

Closing a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech with a hint of surprise at its ending is like signaling your audience to listen to you. 

3. The Illustrative Close

Another method to close your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech is to do it in this way. The artistry in an illustrative close comes from your skill to correct the following:

  • first or third-person anecdote

It can also refer to another storytelling device representing your illustration of the primary points you created during your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech . Many speakers use this manner at the start and end of their talks.

4. The Forward-looking Close

This method of closing a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech is a better option if you discuss suggestions for future trends that could bear your topic. To help your audience visualize what you desire to accomplish, make a vibrant and vivid picture of it because it is essential.

For example, you are a financial consultant talking to a crowd 15 years away from retirement. During your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , share your company’s approach to investment or a portfolio of your products. 

5. The Backward-looking Close

Besides the forward-looking close, there is also a backward-looking close. This way, you move away from the future and go into the past instead.

Let’s say you are wondering how to end a maid of honor Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech as the bride’s sister and has spent so many years and memories with her. During your message, you can recall those moments. Then, from those past happenings, close your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech by wishing her a happy future with her husband. 

6. The Metaphor Close 

You might feel like you are drowning in options regarding how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech . However, if you carefully look at your topic or subject and what you must convey, you will eventually find it easy as pie.

Welcome to the metaphor close. Yes, I just used some metaphors in the earlier part. Perhaps you had noticed them already before I pointed it out.

Metaphors are figures of Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech that indirectly compare two figuratively similar things but are distinct. You do not take it in a literal sense that you are drowning in options, but you can feel that way. 

If you still don’t know how to end a graduation Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , this method may be one of your best options.

7. The Provocative Close

Provocative refers to the tendency to provoke, stimulate, or excite. Of course, as the speaker or presenter, you hope to encourage your audience, but using a provocative close snaps them to attention.

Check the table for some examples of how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech provocatively. 

How to End a PowerPoint Presentation?

When you provide cluttered visual presentations , instead of an illustration that draws the people in, you can use PowerPoint to make a memorable close.

You can encourage and bring out their curiosity through powerful visualization. To help you with this matter, we have provided options for ending a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech with a PowerPoint slide. 

Here are a couple of samples of what you can project:

  • A humorous image but has a profound significance.
  • A photo that is supposedly unrelated to your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech subject or topic needs your explanation.
  • A line graph shows two possible outcomes in which the audience may get involved.

How Should You End a Presentation Slideshow?

Since you have learned what you can project in your PowerPoint presentation and how useful it is to end your talk, let us get into several essential tips on finishing a formal presentation slideshow.

Here are ways you can do to make it memorable and impactful to your audience:

  • Have a clear and concise message

To close your formal presentation slideshow, bring your fundamental message to the forefront and align it with your objectives. You must give your final message down to a notable point so that your audience can walk away remembering what you have said.

  • Utilize the best final PowerPoint slide.

Your final slide will differ according to the type of presentation you are delivering. 

For example, if you are still having second thoughts regarding how to end a maid of honor Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech uniquely, maybe you can opt to make a slideshow presentation for your sister’s wedding. There are creative ways to give your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , especially when you are too nervous about Public Speaking &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Public speaking refers to any live presentation or speech. It can cover a variety of topics on various fields and careers (you can find out more about public speaking careers here: http://orai.com/public-speaking-careers/).  Public speaking can inform, entertain, or educate an audience and sometimes has visual aids.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Public speaking is done live, so the speakers need to consider certain factors to deliver a successful speech. No matter how good the speech is, if the audience doesn&#039;t connect with the speaker, then it may fall flat. Therefore, speakers have to use a lot more nonverbal communication techniques to deliver their message. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:heading --&gt; &lt;h2&gt;Tips for public speaking&lt;/h2&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:heading --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Have a sense of humor.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Tell personal stories that relate to the speech you&#039;re giving.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Dress appropriately for the event. Formal and business casual outfits work best.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Project a confident and expressive voice.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Always try to use simple language that everyone can understand.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Stick to the time given to you.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Maintain eye contact with members of your audience and try to connect with them.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/public-speaking/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">public speaking . 

You only have to ensure that you are using a powerful final PowerPoint graphic slide to showcase your concluding information. Of course, you should fit its theme at the event. 

  • Use animation to highlight something.

Adding a hint of animation in your presentation or slideshow is one of the best ways to bring the significant element onto your slide at the perfect period. A program like PowerPoint has features, such as built-in animations, that you can efficiently utilize. 

How to End a Speech Dos and Don’ts

After discussing the key elements of ending a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech and ways to close your presentation, we should tackle how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s dos and don’ts.

We have compiled a few things that you must consider. See them in this table:

How to End Your Speech Examples (video examples)

We have made your work easier if you seek the best examples of closing a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech . Be worry-free about how to end a maid of honor Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech , graduation address, and other presentations. 

How to End a Graduation Speech

Here are four tips on how to end a graduation Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech that would give you big applause from the crowd:

  • Plan every word of your closing remarks.
  • Close it with a story.
  • Insert a little humor and make the audience laugh.
  • Close your graduation Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech with inspiration. 

How to End a Maid of Honor Speech

Are you worried about how to end a maid of honor Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ? The following are the typical phrases used for the maid of honor speech ending:

  • Let us all toast for the happiness of the newly married couple!
  • Best wishes to the happy and lovely couple!
  • Please raise your glasses in honor of the bride and groom.
  • Cheers to the newlyweds!
  • Wishing years of bliss to the bride and groom!
  • What a beautiful wedding day, so let us toast wherever their lives may lead.

How to Close a Sales Presentation

Another example of how to end a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech we have is closing a Sales Pitch &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Sales personnel use a sales pitch to convince their audience to buy the products they&#039;re selling. It usually contains information about the product, the benefits of buying the product, and how to buy it. With the right content, a sales pitch can be effective. But many people won&#039;t connect well with a sales pitch if it seems too forced and ungenuine. So, sales pitches have developed into shorter and more relatable versions. Here are some tips for nailing your next sales pitch: http://orai.com/practice-public-speaking/ .&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:heading --&gt; &lt;h2&gt;Types of sales pitches&lt;/h2&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:heading --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Rhyming sales pitch&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;When your sales pitch rhymes, it helps people remember it better.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Question pitch&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;This method frames your pitch in the form of a question. It invites the audience to answer the question for themselves to see the importance of your product.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;One-word pitch&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A one-word pitch is a tagline that best represents your product. People must think of your product once they hear the word.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Twitter pitch&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Twitter only has 140 characters per tweet, so it is challenging to think of a sales pitch that fits. So, you have to trim down to the basics and come up with something thought-provoking.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Pixar pitch&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;This type is named after Pixar Studios, masters at creating stories that resonate with everyone. Framing your sales pitch like a story makes it much more interesting to your audience.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Subject line pitch&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;This type is used in email marketing. Your subject line must be well thought out and intriguing enough to garner interest in a potential customer.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/sales-pitch/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">sales pitch . An outstanding presentation turns off if you do not try to create a great closing. To make your customers eager to purchase, try the tips we recommend.

  • Go back to your opening idea.
  • Close it with a challenge to your audience.
  • Indulge your listeners into a metaphorical mission.
  • Share a story.
  • End your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech with a quote.

To get additional sales presentation tips, you can check this video:

How can you effectively call your audience to action?

To ignite action, be crystal clear with your desired action, use persuasive language to spark urgency, and highlight the benefits they’ll reap. Back it up with evidence, repeat it for impact, and remove any hurdles that stand in their way. Finally, it tugs at their heartstrings to connect and motivate them to follow through. This winning formula fuels effective calls to action!

What are some creative ways to end a presentation?

Spice up your presentation ending! Ditch the boring summary and opt for storytelling, metaphors, inspiring quotes, actionable steps, thought-provoking questions, surprising elements, laughter, or genuine gratitude. Choose what fits your style and leave your audience with a bang, not a whimper!

What should you not do when ending a presentation?

When concluding a presentation, it is important to avoid certain practices. One thing you should not do is end your presentation with a slide that simply asks “Questions?” This approach is commonplace and lacks originality, making it forgettable for your audience. Instead, it is crucial to consider alternative techniques for concluding your presentation on a strong and memorable note.

How can something from the opening be repeated to close a presentation?

Start strong, end strong! Bookend your presentation by repeating a thought-provoking question, concluding a captivating story, or tying back to your title. This creates a unified message, satisfying closure, and a lasting impression on your audience. They’ll leave remembering “the answer,” “the ending,” or “the meaning,” solidifying your impact.

What can be used instead of a “thank you” slide?

Ditch the “thank you” slide! Show gratitude verbally and utilize a summary slide with key points, a call to action, and your contact details. More text is okay here; use bullet points for Clarity &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Clarity of speech is often considered in public speaking. It is one of the qualities of a good speech, and without it, a speech can seem vague and cluttered. Whether written or spoken, a clear speech is far easier to understand, and it passes its message across well.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Clarity is a skill that has a massive influence on the success of the speech. A cluttered or unnecessarily verbose speech will only confuse the audience. The audience&#039;s intelligence level should also influence the clarity of the speech.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Tips for mastering clarity in speech&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Pronounce and enunciate words correctly&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Remove filler words like &quot;uh,&quot; um,&quot; &quot;like,&quot; &quot;actually&quot; from your speech.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Avoid using many synonyms in one sentence.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Improve your diction&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Maintain the right tone and pace in your voice. Speak in a measured tone and never rush a speech.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/clarity/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">clarity . It helps during Q&A; attendees might even snap a picture for a handy takeaway.

How can a running clock be used to emphasize the urgency of a message?

Tick-tock! Adding a running clock to your time-sensitive message visually screams urgency. It shows limited time, fuels action, grabs attention, and boosts your message’s credibility. Don’t let your audience miss out – let the clock do the talking!

How can a surprising fact re-engage the audience’s attention?

Attention fading? Drop a surprising fact with stats! It jolts your audience awake, adds credibility, and keeps them hooked. Find it online, but cite your source to be extra legitimate. Facts rock; use them to rule your presentation!

How can the rule of three be used in communication?

Group in threes! This communication rule makes your message stick. Break down ideas, stories, or anything you say into triplets. It’s easy to remember, catchy and keeps your audience engaged with your message long after you’re done. So go forth and conquer with the power of three!

How can the main points be linked to the key message in the conclusion?

Ditch the swim, find the gem! Your conclusion reflects your whole Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech . Summarize key points, deliver a lasting impact, and tie it all together. Don’t leave it as an afterthought – make it resonate, leaving your audience nodding, satisfied, and remembering your message long after you’re done.

How can a visual image be used to end a presentation?

Don’t bore your audience with text! Ditch the cluttered slides and use a powerful image to end your presentation. Funny, thought-provoking, or a line graph with a choice – pick one to intrigue and make them think. Leave it on the screen for impact, let them ponder; your message will stick long after you’re done. Just remember, image and message go hand in hand!

How can a compelling story be used to conclude a presentation?

Forget jokes and platitudes. Close with a powerful story! Not just any story, one that makes them laugh, feel your message and remember it all. Your article mentions this, but their article goes deeper. They say to make it personal, relatable, and tied to your key points. This creates empathy, connection, and an unforgettable ending that leaves your audience wanting more. Go beyond the basics and tell a story they’ll remember long after the presentation.

What are the different ways to end a presentation or speech?

Ditch the panic. Pick your closing! Consider metaphors to leave a deep impression, challenge your audience with a “what if” scenario, or use visuals to stimulate their minds. Summarize key points, deliver a powerful message, and practice your ending for polish. Do avoid rambling, awkward gestures, or rushing out. Remember, a strong closing leaves a lasting mark. Now go captivate them!

In making your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech ’s ending, do not make your conclusion only an afterthought. It should support everything you have said in your talk and remind the audience why your topic matters. 

Leave the people nodding in agreement or satisfied by ending your Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech remarkably. Yes, you can’t win everybody over your talk, but you can significantly make them pause and think.

We hope this article has imparted enough knowledge and answered your question about ending a Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech .  Download the Orai Speech &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech is a crafted message which can be either written or orally delivered. Speeches can carry different messages and can come in handy in almost all events. You can pass any message across using a speech that impacts the lives of multiple people. Speech-giving comes up in almost every area of life, from work to personal relationships.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech can be anywhere between formal and informal, depending on the occasion. For example, a career-related speech will be more formal than one given at a wedding. The purpose of a speech includes commemorating an event, educating people, and even amusing and entertaining a crowd. &lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Common types of speech&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Informative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Persuasive speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Demonstrative speech&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Entertaining&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Motivational speech&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech app for an AI-powered Speech Coach &lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;A speech coach trains people in public speaking techniques and uses them to improve their presentation skills. Getting a speech coach is great if you want to learn how to communicate effectively and get the best results from your speaking engagements.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;You can expect to learn how to control your voice, mannerisms, and other non-verbal communication techniques with a speech coach. They can also help you figure out the best way to present for each audience you take on.&nbsp;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:heading --&gt; &lt;h2&gt;Types of speech coaches&lt;/h2&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:heading --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:list --&gt; &lt;ul&gt;&lt;li&gt;Content coach: A content coach helps you in the speech writing part of your presentation.&nbsp;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Speaker marketer coach: These coaches help you market your speech after you deliver it.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;li&gt;Delivery coach: This type of speech coach helps you develop your speech delivery skills and stage presence.&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:list --&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;!-- wp:paragraph --&gt; &lt;p&gt;Consider using an app speech coach! Click here for more information about Orai and what we do.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;!-- /wp:paragraph --&gt; " href="https://orai.com/glossary/speech-coach/" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" tabindex="0" role="link">speech coach for interactive and fun lessons!

Good luck with your presentation!

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EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

The use of artificial intelligence in the EU will be regulated by the AI Act, the world’s first comprehensive AI law. Find out how it will protect you.

A man faces a computer generated figure with programming language in the background

As part of its digital strategy , the EU wants to regulate artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure better conditions for the development and use of this innovative technology. AI can create many benefits , such as better healthcare; safer and cleaner transport; more efficient manufacturing; and cheaper and more sustainable energy.

In April 2021, the European Commission proposed the first EU regulatory framework for AI. It says that AI systems that can be used in different applications are analysed and classified according to the risk they pose to users. The different risk levels will mean more or less regulation. Once approved, these will be the world’s first rules on AI.

Learn more about what artificial intelligence is and how it is used

What Parliament wants in AI legislation

Parliament’s priority is to make sure that AI systems used in the EU are safe, transparent, traceable, non-discriminatory and environmentally friendly. AI systems should be overseen by people, rather than by automation, to prevent harmful outcomes.

Parliament also wants to establish a technology-neutral, uniform definition for AI that could be applied to future AI systems.

Learn more about Parliament’s work on AI and its vision for AI’s future

AI Act: different rules for different risk levels

The new rules establish obligations for providers and users depending on the level of risk from artificial intelligence. While many AI systems pose minimal risk, they need to be assessed.

Unacceptable risk

Unacceptable risk AI systems are systems considered a threat to people and will be banned. They include:

  • Cognitive behavioural manipulation of people or specific vulnerable groups: for example voice-activated toys that encourage dangerous behaviour in children
  • Social scoring: classifying people based on behaviour, socio-economic status or personal characteristics
  • Biometric identification and categorisation of people
  • Real-time and remote biometric identification systems, such as facial recognition

Some exceptions may be allowed for law enforcement purposes. “Real-time” remote biometric identification systems will be allowed in a limited number of serious cases, while “post” remote biometric identification systems, where identification occurs after a significant delay, will be allowed to prosecute serious crimes and only after court approval.

AI systems that negatively affect safety or fundamental rights will be considered high risk and will be divided into two categories:

1) AI systems that are used in products falling under the EU’s product safety legislation . This includes toys, aviation, cars, medical devices and lifts.

2) AI systems falling into specific areas that will have to be registered in an EU database:

  • Management and operation of critical infrastructure
  • Education and vocational training
  • Employment, worker management and access to self-employment
  • Access to and enjoyment of essential private services and public services and benefits
  • Law enforcement
  • Migration, asylum and border control management
  • Assistance in legal interpretation and application of the law.

All high-risk AI systems will be assessed before being put on the market and also throughout their lifecycle.

General purpose and generative AI

Generative AI, like ChatGPT, would have to comply with transparency requirements:

  • Disclosing that the content was generated by AI
  • Designing the model to prevent it from generating illegal content
  • Publishing summaries of copyrighted data used for training

High-impact general-purpose AI models that might pose systemic risk, such as the more advanced AI model GPT-4, would have to undergo thorough evaluations and any serious incidents would have to be reported to the European Commission.

Limited risk

Limited risk AI systems should comply with minimal transparency requirements that would allow users to make informed decisions. After interacting with the applications, the user can then decide whether they want to continue using it. Users should be made aware when they are interacting with AI. This includes AI systems that generate or manipulate image, audio or video content, for example deepfakes.

On December 9 2023, Parliament reached a provisional agreement with the Council on the AI act . The agreed text will now have to be formally adopted by both Parliament and Council to become EU law. Before all MEPs have their say on the agreement, Parliament’s internal market and civil liberties committees will vote on it.

More on the EU’s digital measures

  • Cryptocurrency dangers and the benefits of EU legislation
  • Fighting cybercrime: new EU cybersecurity laws explained
  • Boosting data sharing in the EU: what are the benefits?
  • EU Digital Markets Act and Digital Services Act
  • Five ways the European Parliament wants to protect online gamers
  • Artificial Intelligence Act

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    1 Give a clear indication that the presentation is coming to an end. In order to conclude your presentation, your audience actually has to know that you've reached the end. Make a clean transition from the body of your presentation to your conclusion with a clear statement. Some things you can say include: [1] "In conclusion…" "In summary…"

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    I sincerely appreciate your attention today/this evening/this morning. And that brings us to the end. I'd like to thank you for your time and attention today. Thank you so much for your interest and attention. At this time, I'd like to have my colleague speak so I'll finish up by saying thank you for your attention.

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